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Old 02-13-2011, 10:35 AM   #31
supershaft
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I think the trick to the tranny clutch lever lock nut is to pull the clutch lever in while you are tightening the lock nut. That keeps your adjuster from moving as you tighten the lock nut. It's still takes two hands but only one wrench. I actually use a deep socket to tighten the lock nut with.
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Old 02-13-2011, 02:20 PM   #32
Rucksta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigger Al View Post
My least favorite is getting those teeny little clips on the master link of a new timing chain. I've got fat fingers, and that job has driven me more nuts than anything else I can think of.
Put the old joiner half way in from the front to position the chain then with the new link super glued to a bit of bent wire slip the new one in from the back.
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Old 02-13-2011, 04:18 PM   #33
brittrunyon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
I think the trick to the tranny clutch lever lock nut is to pull the clutch lever in while you are tightening the lock nut. That keeps your adjuster from moving as you tighten the lock nut. It's still takes two hands but only one wrench. I actually use a deep socket to tighten the lock nut with.
That is a GREAT tip!
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Old 02-13-2011, 04:34 PM   #34
supershaft
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Thanks jorunny. I put it up there with simple but great stuff kind of like when you first someone knock some grips off with compressed air. Oh, so THAT'S how it is done!
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Old 02-14-2011, 05:08 AM   #35
electric_monk
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no.1 The little spring clip that connects the float to the float needle.
no.2 Starter motor bolts
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Old 02-14-2011, 05:59 AM   #36
R12Battletub
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Final drive shimming. What a PITA. And points on a /2, never had an easy time with those.
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Old 02-14-2011, 06:35 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by R12Battletub View Post
Final drive shimming. What a PITA. And points on a /2, never had an easy time with those.
I've heard that one's a major PITA. How long did it take you?
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Old 02-14-2011, 06:42 AM   #38
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I probably spent 6-7 hours on that thing. It doesn't help that I'm slow as molasses but damn, you change one thing then you have to go and measure/change all the other things, which means heating the housing up several times.
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:01 AM   #39
CurlyMike
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Originally Posted by 4ad View Post
two words.....driveshaft boot

I feel sorry for the guy who had to do this at the factory!

AGREE. By far the worst for me constantly. Would rather do a whole top end on a bike than the dreaded boot. Specially with a new boot that has very little give to it. What a ass kicking.

Second is diode board.
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:55 AM   #40
Screaming Chicken
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The Boot has gotten much easier after a few goes, and indeed if you take the shock off and use a strap to hold the swingarm in line with the box. Last time I did that I was "looking forward" to at least half an hour's worth of cursing, but it just flopped on in 2 minutes.

Now the thing I've been postponing for quite some time is replacing the revcounter light. That PD fairing really does a fair job at making up for the general ease of maintenance of an airhead.

Oh, and starter motor bolts? Swap them for the allen ones holding the airbox on. You can then undo the allens without taking the airbox off (still fiddly, but at least possible), and the regular bolts work better at holding the airbox on. Win-win. :-)
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Old 02-14-2011, 04:35 PM   #41
Beemerguru
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Use tiny tie wraps to hold the chain ends together while you slide the master link in from behine. Use a larger one to hold the chain tensioner in its little hole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigger Al View Post
My least favorite is getting those teeny little clips on the master link of a new timing chain. I've got fat fingers, and that job has driven me more nuts than anything else I can think of.

The use of a 90-degree flat screwdriver for the drive shaft boot is great. I have one that I bent years ago for some other task, and it makes getting to the back side of the boot a relative snap.
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Old 02-14-2011, 04:41 PM   #42
Beemerguru
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With the right tools and techniques..much cursing is eliminated from most of these jobs..

Still waiting to learn how to stop throwing things for this one.

Hot engine...I know let it cool.

Right valve cover..front nut next to the exhaust.

I've already switched to the special 10mm nut with the grooved wings for self seatingn so no washer/nut combination to fiddle with...

But I have soooo many little burns on the back of my hands for trying to get that %#%#$ nut on. It's either 20 seconds or 20 minutes.
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Old 02-14-2011, 06:23 PM   #43
Martian
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Greg, I automatically remove the exhaust when fiddling with that nut/washer combination. Waiting for it to cool just meant I wouldn't get burned; I'd still get frustrated trying to work around the exhaust nut. I still use a piece of electrical tape across the back of the wrench to hold the nut and needlenose pliers to slip the washer onto the stud.
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Old 02-14-2011, 06:30 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martian View Post
Greg, I automatically remove the exhaust when fiddling with that nut/washer combination. Waiting for it to cool just meant I wouldn't get burned; I'd still get frustrated trying to work around the exhaust nut. I still use a piece of electrical tape across the back of the wrench to hold the nut and needlenose pliers to slip the washer onto the stud.
That thing is fiddly, but I've found hooking one side on the far end of the stud and applying 45 degrees of pressure with your finger while pulling gets it on fairly easy. It's not the most fun, but is doable.
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:04 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crazydrummerdude View Post
Now that you guys mention it, I never had a problem bleeding the brakes on my airheads.. until I just did it on my R75. I'll bet I pumped it 200+ times.
On /6's and /7's it's helpful/necessary to remove the master cylinder from the frame's backbone and tilt it forward to get the last of the air from the system.

You'll see the bubble rise when you get it.

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