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Old 02-27-2011, 05:04 AM   #121
paulmondor OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherider View Post
Paul:

Perhaps you need to grow a bit thicker skin, to appreciate support in tough situations. Siggy was just encouraging you to stick with it. He does that to all of us when we are having a tough time, (as sometimes happens when the snow is deep near Moose Island). As for him being tough, he works on our bikes bare-handed on the roadside, regardless of the temperature to get us going when we are broken down. In all the years he has wrenched on our ride, he has only had one bike he couldn't get going again, and it had a catastrophic mechanical engine failure. A blooming idiot he is not. A dedicated, tenacious mechanical wizard he is.

Your comment that the group is "a bunch of guys who are derogatory towards others" would seem to fly in the face of the reality that the group feed you, arranged a warm place for you to store and work on your bikes, offered to help you with your repairs, offered you parts for your bike, gave you information on the road conditions you faced west of Fort Chipewyan, and slowed down to check that you were ok when we passed you on the road. In fact, you comment seems to me be downright ingracious. If you want free dinners and support a second time from hosts, you might try a little humility and gratitude.

All the bikers I know tease each other about our various choices of bikes, our lack of riding capability, our gear, how fat or skinny we happen to be and how ugly we are. I think it's called comradeship. If you can't take a little teasing about needing a windscreen on your bike in cold weather, then you ought not to hang with any of the groups of riders I know.

Any of the riders or support drivers in our group would go out on a long skinny limb to help a friend or a stranger, and you were the recipient of some of that kindness. You might want to think about that before posting derogatory comments about the people who help you in the future.

Some of our riders do use heated gear, and our ride is only about 400 kms. long. You seem to suggest that this makes them less of a rider or less of a man than you. So who's wagging their Johnson?

By the way, you aren't the only guy who's done long distances in nippy weather mate. I've done Tuk to Rupert to Halifax in twelve days, (and we all know there ain't no summer road to Tuk) and I didn't come away from it posting derogatory comments about any of the riders I met along the way, whether they were supportive, indifferent, or told me I was nuts. (There, now you've seen my Johnson).

I hope you and Joe have a safe and pleasant ride to Tuk. The Dempster can be tricky in winter if there is a strong crosswind up north of Eagle Plains with drifting snow, and the tendancy for the wind to blow you off the road. If the road crew advise you to wait out the wind, I'd listen to them. As far as I know, the rest of your ride should be relatively easy, as I think you are correct in your view that the bit from Fort Chipewyan to Moose Island can be a bit difficult.
I have to admit and I have no problems doing it. I am wrong. Blame it on anything, the truth is I am wrong. I do not know the guy, I do not know the group, I was tensed and tired and also not used to this style of communications. Then again I am sure they are not used to mine.
I will because in all kindness I want to and have to apologize. I have any times f%$# up and I have again.
SO to the North of 60 group?

I am sorry I have over reacted. I am the one who has been derogatory and judging. Sorry guys! I hope You will forgive a hot headed Frenchman. I am still not sure about the "Tough it up" Comment, but it still is not reason to take someone apart.

And thank you for giving it to me the way it has to be given. Before I am a rider I am human and therefore screw up. I appreciate your honesty and your opinion. Looks like you know the man (Men) and I obviously did not.

I took off the comments and ask the guys to forgive my quick judgement and temper. Thanks again for your honesty and taking the time to write this. I meant this.

Cheers

paulmondor screwed with this post 02-27-2011 at 05:19 AM
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Old 02-27-2011, 08:54 AM   #122
JimmieA
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Paul thank you for clearing up your comments. I can understand that you were tired and stressed and we all make mistakes.

I have one other thing to add. Bashing McMurray and the oil workers isn't good for Canada's interests. It is easy to do but not in our best interests. McMurray and it's citizens are hard workers who make a lot of money and spend their fair share of it. They also pay lots of taxers to the benefit of the rest of Canada. There is one area of Canada that is happy to take the money that flows out of places like McMurray but are quick to bad mouth the oilsands. This (the oilsands) is a Canadian resource and benefits a lot of Canadians. The companies in the oilsands are trying really hard to deal with some of the issues like water useage and tailings ponds. We need to not bash ourselves, if we fight ourselves we will loose. The oil that comes out of McMurray helps North America to not be depent on middle eastern oil.

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Old 02-27-2011, 09:32 AM   #123
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heated gear

I assumed you used heated gear on this trip and was surprised to read that you didn't. Is that just something you don't ever use, or is the charging system on the 800 unable to handle it if you did?
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Old 02-27-2011, 01:50 PM   #124
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It ain't by accident Paul's known as the Iceman...
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:48 PM   #125
paulmondor OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmieA View Post
Paul thank you for clearing up your comments. I can understand that you were tired and stressed and we all make mistakes.

I have one other thing to add. Bashing McMurray and the oil workers isn't good for Canada's interests. It is easy to do but not in our best interests. McMurray and it's citizens are hard workers who make a lot of money and spend their fair share of it. They also pay lots of taxers to the benefit of the rest of Canada. There is one area of Canada that is happy to take the money that flows out of places like McMurray but are quick to bad mouth the oilsands. This (the oilsands) is a Canadian resource and benefits a lot of Canadians. The companies in the oilsands are trying really hard to deal with some of the issues like water useage and tailings ponds. We need to not bash ourselves, if we fight ourselves we will loose. The oil that comes out of McMurray helps North America to not be depent on middle eastern oil.

JimmieA
former oilsands worker.
Hi Jimmie! My intent was not to bash Mac workers or people. Just the type I was and locals were referring to. I agree with you that it should not depict be attached to a general view of all these hard working people, and shit do they work hard.. It was only intended to a few yahoos. So I want to clear this and move on. Like I said it was not meant as a general comment and I apologize if it sounded like this. Thanks to you and Rockmuncher..
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:56 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulmondor View Post
I have to admit and I have no problems doing it. I am wrong. Blame it on anything, the truth is I am wrong. I do not know the guy, I do not know the group, I was tensed and tired and also not used to this style of communications. Then again I am sure they are not used to mine.
I will because in all kindness I want to and have to apologize. I have any times f%$# up and I have again.
SO to the North of 60 group?

I am sorry I have over reacted. I am the one who has been derogatory and judging. Sorry guys! I hope You will forgive a hot headed Frenchman. I am still not sure about the "Tough it up" Comment, but it still is not reason to take someone apart.

And thank you for giving it to me the way it has to be given. Before I am a rider I am human and therefore screw up. I appreciate your honesty and your opinion. Looks like you know the man (Men) and I obviously did not.

I took off the comments and ask the guys to forgive my quick judgement and temper. Thanks again for your honesty and taking the time to write this. I meant this.

Cheers

Paul:

Thanks for the apology. It would be kind of you, (and appreciated) if you were to amend your comments regarding the North of 60 group on the other sites on which you posted them as well.

If you would like to make your thanks for the hospitality more tangible, feel free to send a cheque payable to the Athabasca Delta Community School, to P.O. Box 59, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta T0P 1B0. As with all the donations raised by the Ride North of 60, I am certain it would serve the future of the students well.

Cheers
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:57 PM   #127
paulmondor OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockmuncher1 View Post
I assumed you used heated gear on this trip and was surprised to read that you didn't. Is that just something you don't ever use, or is the charging system on the 800 unable to handle it if you did?
Hey Hey!!! No it is not an accident. But I know for a fact that heated gear does not work (In my case) at temps lower than -35 or colder. And when they don't, by nature they make very poor insulation layer. I rode Labrador at -61 C with one layer of MilSpec Fleece and my North49 Arctic suit.. As we all know, it is air that makes you warm. Hence the ability for your layers to maintain this layer or layers of air between your skin and garment is what is vital.
Heated gear is great at radiating heat inward. but if cold air reached the material that envelopes the element, you are done. This material which is nylon or something like this is known to hold cold and let air though. Therefore in extreme low temps the cold outside of theme negates what they generate. if you put something like gore-tex on top of the heated vest, you will allow air to escape and also as well heat..

Like I said, to each their own, but I for one have been in -60 c riding conditions and slept in snow banks in the army at -52 C. We had no heated gear.. I know Gerbing has developed the new "Micro Wire Technology" for USDOD and the Navy seals. But If you read about what they use it for in their back ops and different outings, it is more for moderate climates to allow the users to maintain optimal body heat and therefore optimal efficiency.

I hope this helps..

Cheers
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Old 02-27-2011, 04:05 PM   #128
paulmondor OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherider View Post
Paul:

Thanks for the apology. It would be kind of you, (and appreciated) if you were to amend your comments regarding the North of 60 group on the other sites on which you posted them as well.

If you would like to make your thanks for the hospitality more tangible, feel free to send a cheque payable to the Athabasca Delta Community School, to P.O. Box 59, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta T0P 1B0. As with all the donations raised by the Ride North of 60, I am certain it would serve the future of the students well.

Cheers
I have amended the comments. at least I think I did. I will check again. The hospitality you guys gave us was beyond anything we had looked for or expected.. Thanks a million again for not only the food and roof, but for the shop and shop tools and materials as well.
I am not used to comments like those I have heard and where I am from, we do not say things like this lightly. nevertheless it was my quick reaction coupled to not thinking too much that got me to react this way.. Again, I am sorry. I will put this behind now as I have many things to worry about besides this.

Please send me an email at Paul@PaulMondor.com with an address where I can send you guys a copy of my books as well for all of you.. I need names and addresses, as well as (If they want to) what they would like me to write in them..

When I go back to the island I will mail you all this.

Cheers and thanks for taking the time to explain and talk about all this. it shows even more how wrong I was to react this way. One more lesson learned.
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Old 02-27-2011, 04:40 PM   #129
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Ok, everyone has hugged and made up. Now can we get back to the RR?
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Old 02-27-2011, 04:52 PM   #130
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Originally Posted by obsidian View Post
Ok, everyone has hugged and made up. Now can we get back to the RR?
+1
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Old 02-27-2011, 05:13 PM   #131
paulmondor OP
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The road to Fort Simpson was brutal today. 425 kms of wind blown ice covered roads and at times covered in a lot of drifting powder snow.

http://paul-iceman-mondor.smugmug.co...56_yxEKD-M.jpg

The side winds were relentless, and we had to stop many times to take refuge in the X5. I could not get my extremities to warm up. I was playing with heating pads. You know these packs you get out of packages and that warm up in a few minutes?
I put one in each boot at the end by the tip of my toes. This filed the gap I have there normally which is air that stays warm and hence; keeps me warm.
But with those things filling the gap, the boot touched the heat pack, which touched my sock, which touched my foot. No air, and no air got me cold.
I removed them and I was better after.
Also discovered that riding at -30 C at 100 km/h sucks the moisture out of you just like it does in summer. We slowed down for a while to 80 km/h and started to feel my extremities warm up..
So from now on if it is colder than -20 C we will stick to 80 km/h.
On our way there we ode by some park that sounded like Baham Falls National Park, which ad this incredible canyon and raging river incased in snow and ice. It was breath taking.

We finally made it to Fort Simpson where we are for two days. I think I will fall into a coma for 12 hours.
The river crossing when you get here is absolutely beautiful. Looks like half a kilometre long and with the wind blowing snow everywhere it was surreal.

They have pulled the ferry sideways up the hill a good 1000 feet. it must be something to see this done when the season is over and the ice road is about to be opened


At one point when I jumped in the X5 to warm up I could not feel my hands and fingers anymore. I thought. the next leg is over 450 kms to Fort Nelson. I think the forecast calls for the same or worse.. I will deal with it when it comes.
So that was it for today. Too cold, too long, too windy, but at all in all it was a great ride.

"Maybe I am just getting too old for this!"
But, again as I looked at the road and the snow covered trees dancing in the wind. The sheet of snow dancing across the road and the wall of blinding powder snow raging behind an oncoming rig(3 in 425 kms), and I realized I was really blessed to be able to do this.
The quiet comforting sound of the tires on the snow covered ice reminding me that I am constantly on the edge of control, the crystallized icicle hanging from my breathing mask's valve outside the helmet, all this was soothing.
My core was warm and my fingers gone, but still I had this grin that would either get me locked up in a stray jacket or tell someone that indeed what I am feeling at this moment is indescribable. I will go for the latter.
There is something about this that makes life palatable. It leaves a taste in your mouth most likely caused by fears, nerves stretched and adrenaline being pumped at 100 litres per minute though your stress fed veins.
It is this taste that keeps me coming back.
The guys of North 60 have been addicted to this for ten years now. Just like me some are 50, some are older and some much younger. Some are engineers and some are oil fields workers and other computer techs. Most of them have families and a lot to lose in doing this. You hear them talk and one cannot help but think they must be lunatics. But they are not.
As I stood there listening one of them telling about his coast to coast to coast in winter and all the challenges he was thrown, i realized that the beautiful madness this 60 year old man was showing me was in fact not really madness, but an impossible to describe feeling. he was giving it his best shot for me to understand. At one one point he thought of who he was talking to and he knew I knew.

I wish you all knew. That is what we were saying the other day. "I wish all riders knew what I know. If they did, winter would something to look forward to."

Look a this picture.

Imagine yourself warm and at peace inside your helmet. In tune with your senses and your skills. imagine knowing right down to your core that each inch travelled on this hones your skills in ways no summer ride ever will. Imagine as you hear your steed's engine rhythmically working every stroke and intake of fresh air and knowing that this is it.. This it THE height you're meant to feel.
You and you only against what so many feel you cannot conquer. And then it comes. This stop and this cup of Joe warm in your hands as you look at the gizillion of snow flakes fall and feel this sense of "I have done it"

I sit here right now grinning. No heat, no clear road, no summer ride can bring out this grin. Am I not loving riding in summer? Hell Yeah I do love to ride on a great summer day. I am French not stupid!
But to know both ends of the spectrum has no price. I can ride in 100 heat and laugh at the difference between that moment and this metal shrinking cold ride. Or I can ride at -50 C and still grin thinking of this beautiful Mountain road disappearing in my mirrors with the colours of spring and summer decorating it. it is the thought of both clashing with each other that makes each season look so....well.........appealing.
I know! I know! I will not convert many. But I sure can hope I could.

Cheers
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Old 02-27-2011, 05:25 PM   #132
paulmondor OP
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Got up this morning and it was -29 C. SOmething was telling me that with the howling wind I would need to jumpstart the bikes. I put the key in and hi the started button. It sounded like more like the sound you hear in those karate movies at slow motion.
wwwwwwwhhhhhhhiiinnnnnnnnnggggggg! Huuuummmmmmfffffffff! Urghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! Whynnnnnnnnnnnnnnne!
It turned at about 1 1/2 RPM.
I walked to the X5, started it and took the battery pack we bought at Canadian Tire. Hooked it up, and the bike turned at 1 1/2 RPM still.
Fiddled with this, swore at that, hit this, Swore at this, tanked on that, cussed at those and started inventing my now well known Frenc Canadian Swears
Maudit colisse de Tabarnac de soeur blindee d'esi de pretre fifi de crisse de cinciboire a bras de mule ensoleillee de sincreme d'arnac de calver, de st-sacrament d'enfant d'petasse de putain a batterie de crisse.
And after 10 minutes of bringing down all the saints from heaven and the ones in hell up, the thing still did not work. after realizing that my ass was as frozen as my fingers because i had foolishly thought this would not take long, I went in and got dressed a bit more. Touched my nuts! Check! They are still there. Rattled my head to see if my two brain cells were still somehow there. Check?
Grabbed my ass and yes- it was still puckering from the fear that all these swears had taken away forever the little chance i had to go to heaven. Now it looks like Purgatory will be dealing town where I will spend an eternity sending Emails to St-Pete trying to bribe him with this damned evangelist's hot wife and the possibility that the cumulus he is sitting on will be used for the first time since........ever for doing something else then sitting on his keester looking at the big "Paid for tickets" book and instead learn that the word Hummmah! Hummah! can actually be used for something else then coughing.

The bikes eventually started and after warming them up for about twenty minutes were were on our way. For the first time in the trip the chain felt like a piece of rebar wrapped around the sprockets. It sucked to be it this morning.
We started feeling the dampness in the air within 10 minutes. it went right through us.. I was thinking "Shit! it is going to be along one!"
Boy was I right or what? Just being right felt weird. I do not like this feeling. feeling wrong is where I am comfortable. It is a known ground and it feels familiar. I know married people feel like this ( I mean married men) but I, am also an inhabitant of Wrongland.. I am the mayor for Krissesake!

The road to Fort Simpson was brutal today. 425 kms of wind blown ice covered roads and at times covered in a lot of drifting powder snow.

http://paul-iceman-mondor.smugmug.co...56_yxEKD-M.jpg

The side winds were relentless, and we had to stop many times to take refuge in the X5. I could not get my extremities to warm up. I was playing with heating pads. You know these packs you get out of packages and that warm up in a few minutes?
I put one in each boot at the end by the tip of my toes. This filed the gap I have there normally which is air that stays warm and hence; keeps me warm.
But with those things filling the gap, the boot touched the heat pack, which touched my sock, which touched my foot. No air, and no air got me cold.
I removed them and I was better after.
Also discovered that riding at -30 C at 100 km/h sucks the moisture out of you just like it does in summer. We slowed down for a while to 80 km/h and started to feel my extremities warm up..
So from now on if it is colder than -20 C we will stick to 80 km/h.
On our way there we ode by some park that sounded like Baham Falls National Park, which ad this incredible canyon and raging river incased in snow and ice. It was breath taking.

We finally made it to Fort Simpson where we are for two days. I think I will fall into a coma for 12 hours.
The river crossing when you get here is absolutely beautiful. Looks like half a kilometre long and with the wind blowing snow everywhere it was surreal.

They have pulled the ferry sideways up the hill a good 1000 feet. it must be something to see this done when the season is over and the ice road is about to be opened


At one point when I jumped in the X5 to warm up I could not feel my hands and fingers anymore. I thought. the next leg is over 450 kms to Fort Nelson. I think the forecast calls for the same or worse.. I will deal with it when it comes.
So that was it for today. Too cold, too long, too windy, but at all in all it was a great ride.

"Maybe I am just getting too old for this!"
But, again as I looked at the road and the snow covered trees dancing in the wind. The sheet of snow dancing across the road and the wall of blinding powder snow raging behind an oncoming rig(3 in 425 kms), and I realized I was really blessed to be able to do this.
The quiet comforting sound of the tires on the snow covered ice reminding me that I am constantly on the edge of control, the crystallized icicle hanging from my breathing mask's valve outside the helmet, all this was soothing.
My core was warm and my fingers gone, but still I had this grin that would either get me locked up in a stray jacket or tell someone that indeed what I am feeling at this moment is indescribable. I will go for the latter.
There is something about this that makes life palatable. It leaves a taste in your mouth most likely caused by fears, nerves stretched and adrenaline being pumped at 100 litres per minute though your stress fed veins.
It is this taste that keeps me coming back.
The guys of North 60 have been addicted to this for ten years now. Just like me some are 50, some are older and some much younger. Some are engineers and some are oil fields workers and other computer techs. Most of them have families and a lot to lose in doing this. You hear them talk and one cannot help but think they must be lunatics. But they are not.
As I stood there listening one of them telling about his coast to coast to coast in winter and all the challenges he was thrown, i realized that the beautiful madness this 60 year old man was showing me was in fact not really madness, but an impossible to describe feeling. he was giving it his best shot for me to understand. At one one point he thought of who he was talking to and he knew I knew.

I wish you all knew. That is what we were saying the other day. "I wish all riders knew what I know. If they did, winter would something to look forward to."

Look a this picture.

Imagine yourself warm and at peace inside your helmet. In tune with your senses and your skills. imagine knowing right down to your core that each inch travelled on this hones your skills in ways no summer ride ever will. Imagine as you hear your steed's engine rhythmically working every stroke and intake of fresh air and knowing that this is it.. This it THE height you're meant to feel.
You and you only against what so many feel you cannot conquer. And then it comes. This stop and this cup of Joe warm in your hands as you look at the gizillion of snow flakes fall and feel this sense of "I have done it"

I sit here right now grinning. No heat, no clear road, no summer ride can bring out this grin. Am I not loving riding in summer? Hell Yeah I do love to ride on a great summer day. I am French not stupid!
But to know both ends of the spectrum has no price. I can ride in 100 heat and laugh at the difference between that moment and this metal shrinking cold ride. Or I can ride at -50 C and still grin thinking of this beautiful Mountain road disappearing in my mirrors with the colours of spring and summer decorating it. it is the thought of both clashing with each other that makes each season look so....well.........appealing.
I know! I know! I will not convert many. But I sure can hope I could.

Cheers

paulmondor screwed with this post 02-27-2011 at 06:26 PM
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Old 02-27-2011, 05:35 PM   #133
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Paul, heard you on sidestandup and now this RR. What a stunning trip !! The Iceman name is well earned....Stay safe
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Old 02-27-2011, 08:23 PM   #134
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"By the way! I am not on Facebook anymore. I got tired of watching people writing about themselves making eggs in the morning or going shopping and finding this lifetime deal on leopard pattern underwear. Holy Crap!! What is happening to the human race??"

Thank you- Glad to know I'm not the only person who feels this way
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Old 02-27-2011, 08:42 PM   #135
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Paul, Wow, are you %$*@! nuts? Seriously, this is an amazing adventure and I couldn't imagine doing a trip like that. I ride all winter in Vancouver, but not when it snows, so my my hats off to you, so stay safe and try not to freeze off any dangly bits. Subscribed and waiting for more. Be Safe!!
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