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Old 02-18-2011, 06:21 PM   #76
WB-PDX
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You can also just put a fork in a wide door jam or staircase, use a car jack (the scissor style) and compress the forks until you actually blow the seals right out the leg. It makes a mess if you aren't careful, but works great every time. Just go slow and make sure the fork can't spring out of your giant home made ghetto vice system. As long as there is no rust further up the fork tube, the new seals will slide right down over and install easily. You can use a long section of PVC if you need to hammer them down in.

I've been using this method any time I need a fast\easy fork seal change on a project bike... especially when I can't get the fork apart.
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Old 02-18-2011, 07:31 PM   #77
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Well...

Never really had so much problems unscrewing the bottom bolt out. Always got it out with the worst case compressing everything in the past.

I've gotten seals (not fork) out before by running a sheet metal screw into the rubber, then using either pliers or slide hammer to pull it out.
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Old 02-18-2011, 08:02 PM   #78
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the screw method mentioned above, or an electricians screwdriver driven into the seal and then pry it out.
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Old 02-18-2011, 08:26 PM   #79
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I've done both methods describes above. Andy, the screw method is great but the space between the stanchion and the fork tube is like 5mm. That is how I scratched the fork tube, and all it did to the seal was tear a hole in it.

I've had 10 different screwdrivers in the seal, and they just break loose and tear another hole. I cannot get anything to remain solid enough to remove a larger chunk.

It my DR forks you have to hold the damper rod with their "special" tool. I made one using a pipe and welded a 3/4" nut to the end. I held the damper rod in place while I spun the bottom bolt out. I thought I could do the same here but looking down the tube everything appears to be round. No schematics show a detail on the top of the damper rod. I feel like I'm loosing my mind. I mean the springs aren't much wider than my thumb, so why is it being such a bear.?

Also, is there any way to fill the dings I've made on the tubes? I'm afraid it will cause the seals to leak, again....
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Old 02-18-2011, 08:43 PM   #80
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Can't say I've ever had this much trouble undoing the bottom bolt.

remove the top nut, use a long tube (pvc) to compress the spring?

Wedge a piece of wood against the damper after removing the spring?



Fine sand paper, followed by a stone might clean up any nicks in the fork tube.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:00 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by norton73 View Post
Can't say I've ever had this much trouble undoing the bottom bolt.

remove the top nut, use a long tube (pvc) to compress the spring?

Wedge a piece of wood against the damper after removing the spring?



Fine sand paper, followed by a stone might clean up any nicks in the fork tube.
Yeah, I'm very frustrated. I haven't taken many forks apart, but I never thought I would be pulling my hair out with these little guys. I keep concocting plans, running downstairs and trying them out only to be screaming 5 mins. later. I actually tried a thing wooden dowel against the damper rod, but it was too thick. Anything thinner is most certainly going to snap when putting pressure on it. Put it this way, a 1/4" iron pipe is too large.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:02 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by WB-PDX View Post
You can also just put a fork in a wide door jam or staircase, use a car jack (the scissor style) and compress the forks until you actually blow the seals right out the leg. It makes a mess if you aren't careful, but works great every time. Just go slow and make sure the fork can't spring out of your giant home made ghetto vice system. As long as there is no rust further up the fork tube, the new seals will slide right down over and install easily. You can use a long section of PVC if you need to hammer them down in.

I've been using this method any time I need a fast\easy fork seal change on a project bike... especially when I can't get the fork apart.
explain this a bit more as it is my next option. are the springs installed? do I have to fill up the leg with oil? do they really just shoot out of the stanchion and on to the fork tube?? I'm trying it tomorrow. Don't have a scissor jack. have to borrow one.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:11 PM   #83
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Ok, tomorrow, try this,

I'm assuming you've got the tube out of the triple clamp.

remove the spring, dump a bunch of kroil, WD40 what ever in the upright fork.

Reassmble the fork, compress the spring with spacers as much as possible, stuff some pvc pipe in there, etc

apply some heat to the bottom of the slider. I'm liking heat guns lately, not too much to burn stuff

hold some ice against the bolt, then use an impact to unscrew.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:16 PM   #84
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Originally Posted by hardwaregrrl View Post
explain this a bit more as it is my next option. are the springs installed? do I have to fill up the leg with oil? do they really just shoot out of the stanchion and on to the fork tube?? I'm trying it tomorrow. Don't have a scissor jack. have to borrow one.


Someone, and I can't remember his username, too many beers this evening, posted a thread about doing this on his GPZ Kwaker.

Hell, I've ridden with him a couple times, lives up near Ashville, musta killed that brain cell
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:33 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by hardwaregrrl View Post
explain this a bit more as it is my next option. are the springs installed? do I have to fill up the leg with oil? do they really just shoot out of the stanchion and on to the fork tube?? I'm trying it tomorrow. Don't have a scissor jack. have to borrow one.
Yes, you must fill the forks with oil. Springs out!

Use a handyman jack or be safe and take it to a machine shop and have them compress them for you. Plus, all of the oil that spews out will be their problem to clean up.

Again, make sure the springs are out. If it slips from the jack, a compressed fork would go through the roof!
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:25 PM   #86
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Have you access to a pneumatic spanner, (windy spanner, rattle gun) then this is your fix.

Just did this three days ago on an R65LS, one bolt undid, the other spun the damper rod, allan key socket on bolt in rattle gun, and the inertia of the damper rod allows the bolt to be removed.

I needed to use the windy spanner to do it up again as well, for the same reason, but this meant that I only needed to access the top of the fork to refill it with fork oil.
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Old 02-19-2011, 05:22 AM   #87
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It has been quite a few years, but as I remember the damper rods were hollow, with a "funnel" like taper at the top. I was always able to spin them loose with a pneumatic wrench, but if that didn't work for you, I would try a long screwdriver, or steel rod with a flat ground on the end to wedge into the center of the rod, after you verify the hollow taper of course.

A lot of seals have a steel ring near the outer circumference of the seal to add rigidity and many times the ring has a lip, you might try to drive the screwdriver at an angle to the outer circumference of the seal then pry with a twisting motion, the combination will many times walk the seal out like a tire machine removes a tire.

As for the nicks, careful work with a stone first to remove the high spots, then some very fine wet sandpaper (1500 grit) should do it. If the nicks are deep, Devcon makes specialty metal filled epoxies for this type of repair. I have some if you should need a little, pm me and I can send enough for a small repair.
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Old 02-19-2011, 05:38 AM   #88
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Hey all!! Thanks so much for all the advice. This thing is making me feel like a dipshit, wondering if I should just move on for now. No. I'm determined. Cleaning up the oil after blowing the seals out doesn't seem like much fun, so I'll leave that as a last resort. I think I'm going to run to home depot and buy a few small dowels and see if I can round the end down enough to jam it in the top of the damper rod. Gave up at about 1am this morning. Gong to look at a job and then I'll attack it.

Andy gadget, I have been using the air wrench, a lot to no avail. Thanks all!!!

And when you guys are talking about taking a "stone" to the nicks, are you reffering to a wet stone? Can I use the one for my knives??
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Old 02-19-2011, 06:09 AM   #89
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.........

And when you guys are talking about taking a "stone" to the nicks, are you reffering to a wet stone? Can I use the one for my knives??
Yes as long as it is flat. A stone will take off the high spots and not damage the surrounding area if used carefully. Sand paper will take off the high spot, but also material from the surrounding area if it is backed by a resilient material, such as your hand, or even a block of wood.
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Old 02-19-2011, 06:55 AM   #90
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So, question about the air filter. I have it, but the foam is toast. Should I buy a k & n, buy foam at a shop, or loose the air box and run a pod? Being that air is so important to the 2-stroke I want to do whats best.
I would get a stock air filter and give it the PJ1 treatment. I cant believe they are expensive.

Edit: Oh god, I'm so behind. disregard.
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