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Old 12-27-2013, 03:41 AM   #196
Kamloopsrider
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Originally Posted by storymitchell View Post
I have been riding since the early 70s and have ridden multiple bikes from the 60s. Even when perfectly adjusted, cable actuated drum brakes can be a challenge to modulate. Get some miles / wear / grit on them and add a burst of adrenaline from someone cutting you off and the brakes generally became on/off. This made it easy to grab a handful of front brake and tuck the front end. As a result, hard stopping was generally about stomping on the rear brake and doing what you could with the front brake which, as someone already noted, was probably going to result in "laying 'er down".

I'd love to see someone that rides a modern bike with disc brakes and ABS get on a well worn /2 or Bonneville from the 60s and demonstrate their braking technique .

I am not advocating "laying 'er down", just saying that there is a basis for the technique and for some people old habits die hard.
My son recently took my Norton out (drums front and rear) came back and asked "How do you ride that f***in' thing"
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Old 12-27-2013, 05:10 AM   #197
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Originally Posted by Kamloopsrider View Post
My son recently took my Norton out (drums front and rear) came back and asked "How do you ride that f***in' thing"
Back in the day I rode a '68 Bonneville. At the time it was considered a sweet handling bike, though lacking the power of the Honda 750s and Kawasaki 900s. I currently ride an ST1100ABS and am quite sure if I got on an older Bonneville (esp. one with the miles and wear mine had) I'd react like your son .
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Old 12-27-2013, 05:25 AM   #198
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My son recently took my Norton out (drums front and rear) came back and asked "How do you ride that f***in' thing"
Answer...........
ACCORDINGLY!
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Old 12-27-2013, 08:05 AM   #199
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Old 12-27-2013, 08:49 AM   #200
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Well, back in the days of crappy brakes, the truly quick riders in the curves are the ones that figured out engine braking, higher (sustained) revs, countersteering and the effectiveness of throttling into and through the turn. If you learn to ride at a pace that maintains steady chassis stability you can ride effectively on the older bikes. Certainyl not as fast as the newer bikes, but a healthy rate all the same.

Watch any good quick rider in the twisties on an old BMW airhead (vintage 88 and older) and you'll soon realize the rider is reading the turns, sighting through the turns, keeping the revs up, using engine bracking with chassis brakes, maintaining steady chassis attitude (no heavy pitching up and down due to braking) and carrying more speed through the turns. Not to mention the old airheads were terrible for jacking the rear end up and down due to the driveshaft effect. A good airhead rider learns early on to maintain throttle through the turns. My 76 R100RS taught me a lot about cornering technique, even surprised my buddy on his Ducati when he couldn't keep up. At the end of the ride he said, "how do you make that thing do that!?"
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Old 12-27-2013, 08:57 AM   #201
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Originally Posted by Andyvh1959 View Post
Well, back in the days of crappy brakes, the truly quick riders in the curves are the ones that figured out engine braking, higher (sustained) revs, countersteering and the effectiveness of throttling into and through the turn. If you learn to ride at a pace that maintains steady chassis stability you can ride effectively on the older bikes. Certainyl not as fast as the newer bikes, but a healthy rate all the same.
Old bikes can be ridden at a pretty good clip. I had to flip the valve covers on my last airhead because one had touched down so many times a hole had been ground through it and it was leaking. Unfortunately, however, engine braking etc doesn't help much when a blue hair or texting teenager makes a left in front of you. At that point, it's mostly going to be about the brakes - which is why I sold my airhead and got a Honda with discs and ABS.
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Old 12-27-2013, 02:07 PM   #202
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Originally Posted by Andyvh1959 View Post
...My 76 R100RS taught me a lot about cornering technique
Take care of it. You have the only one.
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Old 12-27-2013, 03:19 PM   #203
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Originally Posted by Kamloopsrider View Post
My son recently took my Norton out (drums front and rear) came back and asked "How do you ride that f***in' thing"
My winter bike is a 76 CB550. I've had a really hard time adjusting to the brakes on it since i've spent so much time the past year on my KTM 625 SMC.

Having the power to put the bike on its nose with one finger is pretty nice. That being said I think i was a much smoother rider on my CB350F than i am on the 625 on a twisty road, and i'm willing to bet corner speeds were not that far off.
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Old 12-27-2013, 04:05 PM   #204
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Originally Posted by Mgbgt89 View Post
My winter bike is a 76 CB550. I've had a really hard time adjusting to the brakes on it since i've spent so much time the past year on my KTM 625 SMC.

Having the power to put the bike on its nose with one finger is pretty nice. That being said I think i was a much smoother rider on my CB350F than i am on the 625 on a twisty road, and i'm willing to bet corner speeds were not that far off.
I've been wanting to take my cb750 to the dragon for a lap or two, see how it compares.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:24 AM   #205
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Take care of it. You have the only one.
Well, I'd like to say it is the only 1976 R100RS, but it's not. It is serial number 6080414, meaning build #414 of the 1976 model year, a UK model. The R100RS was available in the UK in 76, but in 77 in the USA. I bought it used in 1989 in Marshall, Michigan. The sales guy at the used car dealership corrected me when I said it was a nice 77. It has the 40mm carbs and headers of the 76. Found out later it is a 1976 and is titled as a 76.

For now it is resting comfortably in the front atrium of my house. My daily ride is a 94 R1100RS, and my current project is a 2007 R1200RT is am converting to my idea of a new R1200RS.
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Old 01-15-2014, 04:05 PM   #206
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laid it down/ crash/ f.....ing braggin

About five years ago I was on a short ride with a one week old bike, just smilin' and getting familiar with it. After a little back road twisties I came into a small town on the way home.........I know this town well, i.e. speed trap, but failed to watch my speedo. I did not think I was going fast, at least I wasn't when the limit was 55 before town but in one mile approximate increments it drops to 45 and then 35 near. Well the local police were thankfully protecting the public when they pulled me over. A young officer scours with sour look over my new, shiny steed before asking for the license and insurance card.

He doesn't say much when he comes back from the cruiser after determining I had no outstanding warrants. Hands me back my papers and starts to roll up his sleeves still with the sour look. I actually wonder if he is going to punch me out rather than waste ink on a citation.

He asks me if I know a hill about an hours drive away. "yep" I reply. He then starts telling me how he laid " 'er" down at 157 mph and showed me the evidence in the form of about that many stitches still scarring his arms and parts of his body I am glad he did not show me. He was proud of it all and thankfully did not give me a ticket.
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Old 02-03-2014, 02:09 AM   #207
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I just got off work and it is raining going about 35-40 and someone pulls from a drive way across one lane and into the far lane... My lane... I put on the brakes but it is no good the ground is too slick, the back end starts fishtailing and I know I am either slamming into his car or laying the bike down, and as I am not keen on flying over the top of someones car I reluctantly decide that the 2014 Yamaha Bolt, for the first time ever, shall tip over... with me on it. I tip it over and the bike lands on my leg (looking forward to the bruise on that one, pics to come I am sure)both myself and the bike slide for what seems like 100 feet and the car that cut me off... drives away.
There you go, future generations will continue to hear that there was only one way to avoid disaster: lay 'er down. Because sometimes braking is just no good, but some wild sliding over the road surface does the trick.

http://www.reddit.com/r/motorcycles/...shed_category/
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Old 02-03-2014, 03:00 AM   #208
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Personally, I believe that far more often than not, when someone claims that they "had to lay her down", what they really mean is, "I panicked, smashed the rear brake and the bike went down before I could think to crap my pants." In their minds, they didn't screw the pooch, they surely must have been using their motorcycle superpowers to hit the road intentionally...couldn't be that they just did it all wrong.

"Oh yeah, I meant to do that."
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Old 02-03-2014, 12:36 PM   #209
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Originally Posted by DaLunk View Post
Personally, I believe that far more often than not, when someone claims that they "had to lay her down", what they really mean is, "I panicked, smashed the rear brake and the bike went down before I could think to crap my pants." In their minds, they didn't screw the pooch, they surely must have been using their motorcycle superpowers to hit the road intentionally...couldn't be that they just did it all wrong.

"Oh yeah, I meant to do that."
yep sound like most bad riders smoke off the rear tire then they loose the rear and go down they dont no / not been told the front brake is the high speed brake.

for me i would only " lay it down" if i was hard on BOTH brakes and was not going to stop before hitting a soild object ie big car ect.
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:01 PM   #210
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What would that do? Even if I were going to hit something, I'd rather stay hard on the brakes and scrub as much speed as possible before I hit.
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