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Old 09-01-2012, 02:15 PM   #346
Masterblaster
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Good thread here gents, just joined the club last month with a Roadie, waiting on the triumph fog lights to come, Put the TT engine guard, Triumph spools, and center stand on, waiting on the mega tool tube. will not put hard bags on this bike as I plan to beat the living piss out of it and have a blast doing it so will sick with a good soft tail bag and tank bag. Had it in my mind to put on the HD 4 1/2 LED spot lights but was afraid of the wire harness splicing, I like them a lot on my Ultra, best spots I ever had or seen. The bike is teh perfect all rounder.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:12 AM   #347
The Jerk OP
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How to Replace Coolant

Hello all - this thread has been dormant for a long time, mostly because I got the bike the way I want it and it's still awesome!

Yesterday I went ahead and took care of the time-sensitive services. Every two years you have to replace the coolant and the brake fluid. This post is my how-to on replacing the coolant.

First get your necessary supplies together:
- 1 gallon of 50/50 premix coolant (or mix your own to 50/50). I use the Prestone 50/50 ethylene glycol premix which is widely available at regular auto parts stores.
- drain pan capable of holding 1 gallon.
- allen key or socket for removing some of the plastics, I think it's a 5mm allen.
- 6mm or 1/4" socket or philips screwdriver for the hose clamps.
- funnel, preferably one with a long flexible section.

Next you need to be aware of what is up with your bike. Some of the early production Tiger 800s have a bleed screw on the top radiator hose. This was deleted on later production. So take a look at your top radiator hose and see if you see a screw inserted into the hose at its highest point.

If you DO have the bleed screw:
Place the motorcycle on level ground, on the SIDE STAND.

If you DO NOT have the bleed screw:
Place the motorcycle on level ground, on the CENTER STAND or a paddock stand.

Before you start this job, the bike should be stone cold. This way, the cooling system will not be under pressure and there is no chance of being scalded by hot coolant ejected forcefully under pressure when you open the system.

To gain access to the radiator bits, you first need to remove the upper and lower radiator panels. The lowers come off first, so, stick your head in between the front wheel and the radiator and find and remove these two screws:



Then, on the side of the lower panel, remove the final remaining screw:



Pull the lower panel slightly to the rear, then remove it from the bike. Repeat on the other side. Set the panels somewhere where you won't step on them and put the screws with them. All 3 screws are the same size so you can mix and match.

To do the upper panel, get back in front of the radiator to find and remove this single screw tucked away at a weird angle:



Then remove the single screw visible on the side of the panel:



To remove the panel, you first have to pull up on it a bit to disengage the tabs on the panel from the slots on the fuel tank. Then you pull the bottom edge out and down a bit to angle it out from under the cowl plastics. Once you pull it away from the bike you will see the connectors for the turn signal. Pull the connectors apart (pull the connectors, not the wires), then set the panel somewhere you won't step on it and put the screws with it. The screws for this panel are different sizes so just remember that the shorter one goes on the side. Repeat on the other side of the bike.

Now you have exposed the radiator. On the left top corner of the radiator you will see the pressure cap. This guy's job is to keep the cooling system under pressure in order to raise the boiling point of the coolant mixture so that your coolant stays liquid when hot. This guy also controls when coolant is removed from or diverted to the expansion tank (which is that little clear unpressurized plastic tank on the right side of the bike where you check your coolant level and would normally top off coolant).

At this point you want to remove the pressure cap. But before you do, place your drain pan underneath it as coolant will spill out when you take it off. Push down on the cap and then turn counterclockwise until you hit the stops. Then lift it straight up and set it aside. You will then see this:



Next step is to start properly draining the system by removing the bottom hose from the radiator. Position your drain pan, then undo the hose clamp which secures the bottom hose to the radiator and pull the hose off:



You will get coolant draining from both the radiator and from the hose. Be prepared for splatters. If you have the Triumph crash bars installed, be aware that the coolant will drain onto them and then run along them, dripping off at random faraway points. Bend the top hose down and make it as low as you can in order to drain as much coolant from that part of the system as possible.

Once the gusher has stopped, you then need to remove the coolant hose from the heat exchanger in order to drain that part of the system. The heat exchanger is simply and oil-to-water oil cooler. You'll find it located on the front of the engine to the left of the oil filter if you're facing the front of the engine. There's a short section of rubber hose that needs to be removed. Position your drain pan and then:





Once everything has drained, reattach the piece of hose at the heat exchanger and secure the clamps. Then reattach the bottom hose to the radiator and secure the clamp. Don't overtighten them, just nice and snug.

Now you want to remove the top hose bleed screw if you have one using a flat-blade screwdriver:



It would be tricky to get a screwdriver in there between the hose and the tank, but luckily you don't have to. The hose has enough flexibility that you can pull it out and rotate it a bit to get the screwdriver on the screw.

Then you want to go to the top right side of the radiator and remove the bleed screw there. Even though the screw itself has a philips head, I found that my stubby Craftsman screwdriver fit it perfectly - much better than my stubby Craftsman philips which was too small for the slots in the screw head. Due to clearance between the radiator and tank, you will only be able to get it started with the screwdriver. Then, as the screw begins to rise from the radiator, you won't be able to get the screwdriver in there anymore. I had success, after getting it started, with GENTLY gripping it with pliers and rotating it. The screw is made of soft plastic so you have to be careful with it. Set both the bleed screws aside.

Now the service manual doesn't specify any changes to the bike attitude for filling, i.e. if you have the bleed screw it seems like you're meant to fill the system on the side stand and if you don't have the bleed screw, the bike should remain level. First I'll tell you how the service manual says to fill the system, then I'll tell you how I did it.

------official Triumph instructions-------

1) Slowly add coolant mixture to the system, through the filler opening in the radiator, until the system is full.

2) If the system has filled correctly and fully, there should be coolant visible through the:
- radiator bleed screw opening;
- top hose bleed screw opening (if fitted);
- radiator filler opening.

3) If no coolant is visible through the radiator bleed screw opening, but the filler side appears to be full, attach a length of clear tubing to the radiator bleed screw spigot and syphon coolant into the bleed screw side of the radiator. Note: A hand operated vacuum pump or similar should be used to syphon the coolant through the system.

4) If necessary, top up the system through the filler and refit the pressure cap.

5) Install the radiator bleed screw and tighten to 1.5 Nm.

6) If fitted, install the top hose bleed screw and tighten to 1 Nm.

7) With the aid of an assistant, lean the motorcycle fully over to the right hand side, and then the left hand side, to release air trapped in the cooling system. Repeat as necessary.

8) Start the motorcycle and allow to run for approximately 20 to 30 seconds. Briefly raise the engine speed several times to allow any air to be expelled from the system.

9) Stop the engine. Check and top up the coolant level as necessary.

10) With the aid of an assistant, lean the motorcycle fully over to the right hand side, and then the left hand side, to release air trapped in the cooling system.

11) Start the motorcycle. Briefly raise the engine speed several times to allow any air to be expelled from the system.

12) Allow the engine to run until the cooling fan operates.

13) Stop the motorcycle and allow the engine to cool.

14) Check and top up the coolant level as necessary.

-------end of Triumph official instructions-------

I did find that the left side of the radiator seems to fill up before coolant makes its way over to the right side, so I did find leaning the bike over to the right to be helpful. I would fill the radiator until full on the left side, then squeeze the radiator bottom hose a few times which was helpful in pumping fluid throughout the system and pumping out air bubbles (this is recommended by Triumph in the service manual), then I would lean the bike over to the right as far as I could by myself, then left, and repeat a few times.

Eventually after several iterations of this, I got to the point where the system was as full as I could get it. I even topped off a bit into the bleed screw hole on the right side of the radiator which took a little coolant but then the excess started draining out of the fill side. At this point I could add no more coolant and rocking the bike/squeezing the bottom hose no longer helped. Coolant was not visible at either the radiator bleed screw or the top hose bleed screw but I knew from the manual that the system capacity was 2.4L (a little over a half a gallon) and that I had gotten about that much in from my bottle, so I reinstalled the bleed screws and the pressure cap and fired it up.

I let it run for about 30 seconds, revving the engine a bit as instructed to expel any air bubbles. Then I topped off the expansion tank, fired up the engine, and let it run until the cooling fan came on. Then I took it for a test ride to go get a burger. After I got back home, I let it cool down and checked the expansion tank later. Topped it off once more as the level had dropped and will keep an eye on it for a couple more cycles but everything seems to be working properly.

If you spill any coolant on the ground while you're working, be sure to hose down the area with lots of water. Ethylene glycol coolant is highly toxic but has a sweet taste so animals (and children! - keep the stuff away from the kids) like to drink it. Then they get kidney failure and die. Luckily it can be diluted very easily with lots of water.
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:56 AM   #348
jimjim
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A much simpler job if you have one of these. I haven't used it on my Tiger yet but worked great on my GL1800.

http://www.amazon.com/UView-550000-A...sim_sbs_misc_1
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Old 12-25-2013, 06:12 PM   #349
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Thanks for the write ups in this thread. I just used your pics of the light install and it made it simple.
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:59 PM   #350
aussie_king_mick
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Thumb Tiger 800 - Fuel tank removal:

I found this YouTube video that may help you too.
Tiger 800 - Fuel tank removal:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBsuUqPoF2M
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Old 03-20-2014, 12:49 PM   #351
Nessman
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Performing thread CPR to the beat of "Stayin' Alive"

Moar Roadie talk please, 'specially reasons to not buy one.

I like the lower seat for my ~32" inseam
I like the tubeless tires
I like the riding position better (lower bars?)
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Old 03-20-2014, 02:37 PM   #352
Rharrod
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=962354
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Old 03-20-2014, 05:40 PM   #353
swimmer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessman View Post
Performing thread CPR to the beat of "Stayin' Alive"

Moar Roadie talk please, 'specially reasons to not buy one.

I like the lower seat for my ~32" inseam
I like the tubeless tires
I like the riding position better (lower bars?)
Obviously most tiger 800 talk occurs in the Beasts section, even for Roadie owners like me.

It's too bad the Roadie has the reputation as the lesser of the two bikes (XC). People should look at it not as less "ADV" bike but as just what it is, a really good bike for commuting and traveling on. I've had mine for a little over two years and just past 26k miles.

If you are under about 160lbs you'll probably find the front suspension way over damped and harsh. I also like the lower and narrower bars vs. the XC. I'd actually like the bars more narrow.
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Old 03-20-2014, 06:42 PM   #354
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swimmer View Post
Obviously most tiger 800 talk occurs in the Beasts section, even for Roadie owners like me.

It's too bad the Roadie has the reputation as the lesser of the two bikes (XC). People should look at it not as less "ADV" bike but as just what it is, a really good bike for commuting and traveling on. I've had mine for a little over two years and just past 26k miles.

If you are under about 160lbs you'll probably find the front suspension way over damped and harsh. I also like the lower and narrower bars vs. the XC. I'd actually like the bars more narrow.
I come from a sport/track/roadracing background the Roadie was the one I wanted because it can run more road oriented tires, everyone's adventure is different, glad they make them both ways.
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Old 03-20-2014, 08:24 PM   #355
Nessman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swimmer View Post
Obviously most tiger 800 talk occurs in the Beasts section, even for Roadie owners like me.

It's too bad the Roadie has the reputation as the lesser of the two bikes (XC). People should look at it not as less "ADV" bike but as just what it is, a really good bike for commuting and traveling on. I've had mine for a little over two years and just past 26k miles.

If you are under about 160lbs you'll probably find the front suspension way over damped and harsh. I also like the lower and narrower bars vs. the XC. I'd actually like the bars more narrow.
I'm well over 160# so I should load the suspension well

Thanks for the posts, the Roadie is the bike that checks the boxes for me. Visiting the dealer this weekend, if I can swing a deal the Tigger will replace the DR650 for my daily commuter.
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Old 03-21-2014, 06:15 AM   #356
ducnut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nessman View Post
if I can swing a deal the Tigger will replace the DR650 for my daily commuter.
WOW! That'll be a commuter upgrade.
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