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Old 05-06-2011, 05:53 PM   #61
RaY YreKa
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Originally Posted by Bueller View Post
My list:

Tiger 800.

Then I'll worry about everything else
You buying one Bueller?
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:59 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by Trent in WA View Post
According to the dealer, Triumph can't build them fast enough to satisfy the demand for them. I think they have a real winner in this bike.
Triumph expected the T800s to be their 2nd best seller, about level with the Speed Triple. As a Brit I'm proud that this 'small' marque seem to produce such great bikes (I did a factory tour last Sept, it made me drool).

In fact, there are a lot of people on this site (who I respect) who are buying the Tigger in 800 or XC guise.

Pretty cool.
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Old 05-06-2011, 07:04 PM   #63
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In the last 6 months I have bought, ridden, and sold three late model Triumphs. A 2010 Tiger SE, a 2010 Thruxton, and a 2009 Scrambler. I am in awe of how well done they are, well constructed, fit and finish is awesome, and the ride, handling, performance, brakes, comfort etc, on all three models was more than I expected.

I believe that Tiumph builds "better" motorcycles that their Japanese competition, and model for model, are competetive with any similar bike you want to put them up against.

If it were possible, I would become a Triumph dealer!

All that having been said, I think their biggest dissapointment is the the Rocket line. I'm not saying they aren't good, but the combination of weight, styling and bulk just doesn't resonate with the American market. I own and ride a 2010 HD RoadGlide, and it feels small and nimble compared to the Rocket. Just saying, IMHO
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Old 05-06-2011, 08:46 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by ray_rev View Post
You buying one Bueller?
Truth be told I'm going back & forth between the road version of the 800 and the Harley XR 1200. Getting another bike means I'm selling the Cross Bones - my only Harley, and a bike I thoroughly enjoy. But I really have the itch for something a little sportier/better handling, yet comfortable enough to take a trip to the mountains for a few days and take advantage of said mountains once I get there. The Cross Bones is plenty comfortable, but doesn't possess a shred of "sport".

The XR is a logical choice. It is a snap to work on, and with a single throttle body, belt drive, hydraulic valve lifters, and comparatively cheap parts I'm sure I couldn't put a less expensive or easier bike to maintain in my garage. I also like the fact that it is more or less a domestic product. Performance and handling are plenty adequate, though not what I would consider to be fantastic. but certainly acceptable and entertaining. Suspension is very good, if not great. And it would still scratch the Harley itch to a certain degree. But unfortunately it isn't available with ABS.

Conversely, the 800 does have available ABS. It is also a bit more comfortable with more leg room and less knee bend. The luggage options are much better, in no small part because they are almost non-existent on the XR. But the Triumph also is a little more maintenance intensive, and though I can work on, maintain, and fix just about anything I really just don't want to anymore. I *hate* swapping valve shims. Not crazy about synchronizing throttle bodies either. But still a Triumph is one of only two production brands I've never owned, and as much as I want to continue to have a Harley in the garage I also like the idea of trying something different. Just like I have in the past with bikes like the '02 MG Le Mans I had, though I would expect the trumpet to be a much less frustrating ownership experience.

So there you have it. Two very different approaches to motorcycling that would provide a similar purpose for me. I think the 800 might be a fun bike to own, the only bummer is I don't want to give up owning a Harley for it. But I probably will.
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Old 05-07-2011, 05:56 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Bueller View Post
Truth be told I'm going back & forth between the road version of the 800 and the Harley XR 1200....

So there you have it. Two very different approaches to motorcycling that would provide a similar purpose for me...
Strange pair .... but also the only pair that I'm considering..

Love the simplicity and lack of maintenance of the HD, but in my case, quality control issues have offset that advantage. Still love riding this bike though - always puts a smile on my face.

Test road the T800 last Sunday through some of my favorite twisties and liked it a lot. The two bikes just might complement each other very well.

Thinking hard about it, and will following this thread closely.
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Old 05-07-2011, 06:55 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by Bueller View Post
Truth be told I'm going back & forth between the road version of the 800 and the Harley XR 1200. Getting another bike means I'm selling the Cross Bones - my only Harley, and a bike I thoroughly enjoy. But I really have the itch for something a little sportier/better handling, yet comfortable enough to take a trip to the mountains for a few days and take advantage of said mountains once I get there. The Cross Bones is plenty comfortable, but doesn't possess a shred of "sport".

The XR is a logical choice. It is a snap to work on, and with a single throttle body, belt drive, hydraulic valve lifters, and comparatively cheap parts I'm sure I couldn't put a less expensive or easier bike to maintain in my garage. I also like the fact that it is more or less a domestic product. Performance and handling are plenty adequate, though not what I would consider to be fantastic. but certainly acceptable and entertaining. Suspension is very good, if not great. And it would still scratch the Harley itch to a certain degree. But unfortunately it isn't available with ABS.

Conversely, the 800 does have available ABS. It is also a bit more comfortable with more leg room and less knee bend. The luggage options are much better, in no small part because they are almost non-existent on the XR. But the Triumph also is a little more maintenance intensive, and though I can work on, maintain, and fix just about anything I really just don't want to anymore. I *hate* swapping valve shims. Not crazy about synchronizing throttle bodies either. But still a Triumph is one of only two production brands I've never owned, and as much as I want to continue to have a Harley in the garage I also like the idea of trying something different. Just like I have in the past with bikes like the '02 MG Le Mans I had, though I would expect the trumpet to be a much less frustrating ownership experience.

So there you have it. Two very different approaches to motorcycling that would provide a similar purpose for me. I think the 800 might be a fun bike to own, the only bummer is I don't want to give up owning a Harley for it. But I probably will.
The 2011 XR1200X is stunning, in black or white. It was an option I was aware of, but the luggage thing was a deal killer. If there were good luggage options for it, then range might be an issue as well. But then again it is one darn good looking motorcycle.

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Old 05-07-2011, 07:27 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by andoulli View Post
The 2011 XR1200X is stunning, in black or white. It was an option I was aware of, but the luggage thing was a deal killer. If there were good luggage options for it, then range might be an issue as well. But then again it is one darn good looking motorcycle.

Range. That discussion always gives me a chuckle. In this example the XR will knock out 150+ miles unless you are running the snot out of it. I can make a gas stop in 5 minutes. A stretch every couple of hours is a good thing. No, it doesn't cover 275 miles on a tank like I once did on my k1200 LT, but it isn't nearly as comfortable either. I don't want to be on the damn thing that long without stopping, and who really cares if I blew an extra 10-15 minutes at gas stations during a 600 mile day because I stopped 4 times when someone else stopped twice.

I've seen lots of negative comments here about the fuel range of the XR from wanna-be iron butt riders, dismissing it because it doesn't carry enough fuel. I am an IBA member and have done enough of those rides to know that just as important as fuel range is the question of how efficient you are when you stop. Burning two smokes and a sandwich at each stop on a bike that carries more fuel negates the advantage. And that's what most people do at gas stops.

Any sport/standard that carries 150 or more miles of fuel is plenty. If someone really thinks that is inadequate perhaps instead they should be looking at an RT, GSA, or perhaps the upcoming stelvio.
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Old 05-07-2011, 07:41 AM   #68
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Range. That discussion always gives me a chuckle. In this example the XR will knock out 150+ miles unless you are running the snot out of it. I can make a gas stop in 5 minutes. A stretch every couple of hours is a good thing. No, it doesn't cover 275 miles on a tank like I once did on my k1200 LT, but it isn't nearly as comfortable either. I don't want to be on the damn thing that long without stopping, and who really cares if I blew an extra 10-15 minutes at gas stations during a 600 mile day because I stopped 4 times when someone else stopped twice.

I've seen lots of negative comments here about the fuel range of the XR from wanna-be iron butt riders, dismissing it because it doesn't carry enough fuel. I am an IBA member and have done enough of those rides to know that just as important as fuel range is the question of how efficient you are when you stop. Burning two smokes and a sandwich at each stop on a bike that carries more fuel negates the advantage. And that's what most people do at gas stops.

Any sport/standard that carries 150 or more miles of fuel is plenty. If someone really thinks that is inadequate perhaps instead they should be looking at an RT, GSA, or perhaps the upcoming stelvio.
Bueller, I agree with all that. But, is that 150 to empty, or 150 to low fuel lite. There is a difference there that matters to some including me. If I am riding by myself range is never an issue. I had a Honda VTR 1000 which may be near the top of the list of range challenged motorcycles. I got a low fuel warning light on that bike at 120 miles. Again, never a problem when by myself. My riding buddies usually stop for gas around 160 miles, a distance that was beyond the range of my VTR. So when my low fuel light would go on I would start to worry, do they remember I am the short straw here, depends on who is leading. It was often a problem getting their attention to stop. I prefer to have a bike that at least is more or less the same as my riding group or better in terms of range, That way no worries. Just me.
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Old 05-07-2011, 08:31 AM   #69
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Bueller, I agree with all that. But, is that 150 to empty, or 150 to low fuel lite. There is a difference there that matters to some including me. If I am riding by myself range is never an issue. I had a Honda VTR 1000 which may be near the top of the list of range challenged motorcycles. I got a low fuel warning light on that bike at 120 miles. Again, never a problem when by myself. My riding buddies usually stop for gas around 160 miles, a distance that was beyond the range of my VTR. So when my low fuel light would go on I would start to worry, do they remember I am the short straw here, depends on who is leading. It was often a problem getting their attention to stop. I prefer to have a bike that at least is more or less the same as my riding group or better in terms of range, That way no worries. Just me.
To each their own. I tend to buy bikes I like to ride, not bikes that work well in a group or match another's fuel range.

When my SO rode an F650 she always needed gas 60 miles or so before I did on my RT. So we stopped. She would signal when her low fuel light was on if I hadn't already pulled off. I also considered it my responsibility to know approximately when she was going to be ready to stop. We covered most of the U.S. and Canada this way without issue and never got lost from each other.

When I ride with a group of friends (which isn't very often at all - I really don't like group riding of any kind) if I need gas, signal them, and they don't respond I'm still going to pull over. Fuck 'em if they aren't paying attention. they'll either figure it out and come back, or not.

None of those things would ever interfere with my purchase of the motorcycle I want to ride.

I haven't even looked at the range on the Tiger 800. Don't really care. I figure it has to be in the neighborhood of 180 - 200 miles. That's great. Anything more is a bonus. I don't consider that extra fuel range compared to the XR to be a decision-influencing issue. Nice, but not necessary. I live in the eastern half of the country, where there's a gas station every 300 feet. I have no intention of trying to ride the James bay road (again) on this bike, nor to I intend to cross the center of Australia on it. 150 miles is fine, but if someone feels it's woefully inadequate - whether it's because a puny tank doesn't give them bragging rights at the local Starbucks, or because they can't cross the Sahara without a 600 mile range - to each their own.
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Old 05-07-2011, 08:52 AM   #70
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Range

Some of us DO live where 150 miles ain't enough, a few of us even ride in the spring and fall when the gas stations up high aren'y open yet. But htere aren't to mnny of us, and not many places 150 isn't just fine. And no I'm not in the outback of Australia and this shure as shit ain't the Sahara.

Hayden Valley yesterday, only about 120 miles round trip to gas, but still going up.




On the way up Sylvan Pass, sinwe wave drifts cut by a rotary, now about 90 miles back to gas



But I would love a XR for a round town scoot.
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Old 05-07-2011, 11:30 AM   #71
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For me, the XR's tank is 120-130 to warning light - I think I'd be walking at 150. Locally (near NYC) I'm not too worried - plenty of stations and I know where they are. But there's lots of good riding nearby (Catskills, Adirondacks, VT) where you have worry - better start searching at 90-100 miles.... and carry 1.5L camping fuel containers.... and a syphon hose - especially if you are alone.

XR's luggage is crap - hard-sided cases and flimsy zippers don't go together, my tank bag blew apart at 19k, a record for me.

Fuel range and luggage are major reasons I'm considering the T800... and also tires. Metz Tourance were the best/longest lasting tires I've ever used and I can't wait be back on something that'll last over 4k. I just put on my 7th rear on the XR in 22k.
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Old 05-07-2011, 11:58 AM   #72
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For me, the XR's tank is 120-130 to warning light - I think I'd be walking at 150. Locally (near NYC) I'm not too worried - plenty of stations and I know where they are. But there's lots of good riding nearby (Catskills, Adirondacks, VT) where you have worry - better start searching at 90-100 miles.... and carry 1.5L camping fuel containers.... and a syphon hose - especially if you are alone.

XR's luggage is crap - hard-sided cases and flimsy zippers don't go together, my tank bag blew apart at 19k, a record for me.

Fuel range and luggage are major reasons I'm considering the T800... and also tires. Metz Tourance were the best/longest lasting tires I've ever used and I can't wait be back on something that'll last over 4k. I just put on my 7th rear on the XR in 22k.
Sounds like a bunch of good reasons to pick the kitten, not to mention Starbucks bragging rights.
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Old 05-07-2011, 02:36 PM   #73
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Some of us DO live where 150 miles ain't enough, a few of us even ride in the spring and fall when the gas stations up high aren'y open yet. But htere aren't to mnny of us, and not many places 150 isn't just fine. And no I'm not in the outback of Australia and this shure as shit ain't the Sahara.
Just as a Ural or Royal Enfield aren't built with the highway speeds of West Texas in mind and wouldn't survive those speeds for any length of time, no bike is built to be used in every situation. The important part of this discussion isn't to derail what will be a good and informative thread about the 800, I was just making a comment that the vast majority of people who poo poo a 150 mile range are never more than 30 miles from a gas station. There will always be exceptions, and apparently your living situation is one of them.

Back to the subject at hand, I looked at the 800 XC today and was offered a test ride on it. I declined, not wanting to put miles on someone else's new bike when I know I won't buy it. But I was able to confirm I have absolutely no interest in the XC. Too tall for me, and I'm not interested in the negative effects the 21" wheel will have on handling on pavement compared to the standard version. I'm pretty sure I could take the road going version into any dirt I'd take the XC anyway, because I'm not a hard core dirt rider and don't have any interest in becoming one. If I buy an 800 it will most certainly be the road going version, with ABS, preferably in white. I'd add all three boxes, engine guards, fog lights, and heated grips.

I still haven't ruled out the XR1200 either. It is likely to come down to which one is available when it comes time to purchase. Now if I could only sell my Cross Bones and sidecar
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Old 05-07-2011, 08:18 PM   #74
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So today I got some time to work on the bike and install the Triumph heated grips kit and the Triumph GPS mount.

Not having the service manual in hand yet, the big puzzle was figuring out how and in what order to remove all the plastic in order to get the tank off. I was thinking that this bike would have less plastic to remove in order to get the tank off than the 1050 but unfortunately it's about the same. Oh well.

You gotta take off the little "collar" that goes from the top of the tank forward under the headlight (4 screws), the lower plastic side panels (3 screws each), the upper plastic side panels (the ones that hold the turn signals - 2 screws each) and the black plastic side panels that say "800" on them - 2 screws total.

Once you pull out the "800" panels there are two bolts that hold the tank to the frame. You undo those, pull the tank rearward a little and lift it up at the back - undo the 2 vent hoses, pull the 2 electrical connectors off and the quick-release self-sealing fuel hose. Then you can take the tank off.

Access is good once you have the tank off. I was surprised to see how much narrower the 800 engine is than the 1050. But I guess it makes sense, the 800 was created by stroking the 675 while keeping bore the same so it should be a pretty small engine width-wise.

The heated grip kit is technically simple enough for those with good backyard mechanic experience though it does take some time to get it done. The trickiest part is feeding the wires to the grips through the bars and fishing them out the hole they're supposed to come out of - some really thin needle-nose pliers or a dental hook type of implement come in real handy for that. But the kit instructions are good and everything tucks away behind the left side radiator cover panel. I like the push-button switch on the kit - the old kit for the 1050 had a rocker-type switch mounted somewhat inconveniently up by the instruments - kinda tricky to reach.

The 800 kit gives you a big push button with mounts on the bar right next to the left side mirror. Push it once, it lights up red and the grips are on high. Push it again, it lights up green and the grips are on low. Push it again, light goes out and grips are off. Simple.

The Triumph GPS mount is a nice piece of kit, all fancy looking aluminum as if Triumph had been browsing the Touratech catalog before designing it. You take the left mirror off (22mm wrench), replace half of the clutch lever clamp with the clamp half from the kit (which contains the mirror mount), the GPS mount goes on top and then the mirror goes back on. The GPS mount is adjustable for left/right tilt as well as horizontal to vertical tilt. You just bolt up your Garmin mount to the Triumph mount and you're good to go. While I had the tank off, I ran the Garmin wiring down through the big hole in the left side of the frame near the headstock, then back to the battery. Then I found out I was out of ring terminals so I'll hook it up to power on a later date when I get a chance to make a run to the auto parts store.

I should have taken more pics but I didn't. Below you can see the bike with the tank off and with the heated grips already installed. You can see the push button for the heated grips on the left side of the bars next to the left side switches.



Here you can see where all the heated grip hardware goes - left side next to the radiator. The relay mounts there and that's where all the wiring runs to and all the connectors live. Then the sub harness connects to the main harness at a plug under the tank.

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Old 05-07-2011, 09:20 PM   #75
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The bike's design just looks so clean they way everything fits in...The frame is gorgeous!
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