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Old 04-05-2013, 08:59 PM   #1
jlpp OP
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F800GS, front brake line severed, in Laos

I took a spill in Laos and the front brake line on the F800GS was severed somehow. This is the short line that connects the master cylinder to the distribution piece mounted to the frame about a foot below. The part is "34 32 7 700 781 - Brake-line control circuit, front."

There seem to be quite a few motorcycle part shops and even hydraulic "hose" shops here in Thakek. Assuming I don't find the OEM part in Laos (very safe assumption) does anyone know how to determine the specs on the part so that I can search for (or describe to a shopkeep) something more generic that can get us a couple thousand kilometers through SE Asia, to an OEM part in Bangkok?

I'll disconnect the two severed ends to show around but was hoping there may be some compatible part that I could ask about too.

Thanks for any advice.

Jeff
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Old 04-06-2013, 01:14 PM   #2
JRWooden
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Hey Jeff ...

Sorry for your troubles ... you might find specs here:

http://www.spieglerusa.com/

But I think a good hose shop should be able to look at the two pieces and fashion a replacement!
if you can get them, it would be a good idea to replace the copper (?) sealing washers as well. Can of brake fluid and a good bleed and you should be back to adventuring ...

If you have an ABS bike don't forget the small bleed screw on the master cylinder in addition to the ones on the calipers!

Sometimes with ABS it is difficult to get all the air out ... someone here suggested tying the front brake handle in (firmly but not overly aggressively) and leave it that way for a while (overnight) and I was surprised to find that it did help :-)
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Old 04-07-2013, 08:48 PM   #3
Hamish71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpp View Post
I took a spill in Laos and the front brake line on the F800GS was severed somehow. This is the short line that connects the master cylinder to the distribution piece mounted to the frame about a foot below. The part is "34 32 7 700 781 - Brake-line control circuit, front."

There seem to be quite a few motorcycle part shops and even hydraulic "hose" shops here in Thakek. Assuming I don't find the OEM part in Laos (very safe assumption) does anyone know how to determine the specs on the part so that I can search for (or describe to a shopkeep) something more generic that can get us a couple thousand kilometers through SE Asia, to an OEM part in Bangkok?

I'll disconnect the two severed ends to show around but was hoping there may be some compatible part that I could ask about too.

Thanks for any advice.

Jeff
Any brake shop should be able to put a male end on each hose by crimping it in place, and a "joiner" to connect them. Not a difficult job with the right flaring tools at hand. That way they wont need any banjo adaptors of the right size, just a joiner for the old line.
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Old 04-08-2013, 05:50 AM   #4
JRWooden
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Hey that's cool!

Never heard of a "joiner"....

Once the joiner is installed can the "angle" of the banjo fittings one-to-the-other be adjusted, or is that a "one-time" deal that has to be done at installation?
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Old 04-08-2013, 08:27 PM   #5
jlpp OP
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Thanks for the help, guys.

We found a some small motorbike stores here in Thakhek (that's about all they ride around here) and they did have some generic, cheap looking brake lines that may have worked. One was even metal braided. But the banjos were obviously not positioned the same as the OEM and they looked to be made of aluminum. One of these may have worked to get us to Bangkok but we passed on those to explore other options in town.

Next we went to a hydraulic hose shop we had passed on the way in. They had spools of hydraulic lines of various diameters, mostly very large, and huge connectors. I suppose their typical customer owns a tractor or back hoe. The staff didn't speak English and we don't speak Lao but after a bit of gesturing we conveyed that we wanted to have a new hose fitted to the existing banjos in the same length and rotational configuration as the original. They conveyed back that it was possible.

They got to work cutting the banjos off the severed line, then welding them to connectors that are compatible with larger diameter hydraulic hose and finally fitting the ends to the new hose. About 30 minutes of work. This new hose has a slightly larger inner diameter, compared to the OEM part, and quite a bit larger outer diameter -- maybe twice as large. On the up side, it seems indestructible. On the down side, it's relatively stiff and nearly impossible to twist so contorting to fit could be a bear if the banjo positions weren't good. We paid about $15 for the materials and labor, probably $10 more than they would have taken, but we had a workable part, as long as the welds were leak-free.

We took the new hose and 1/2 liter of DOT 3 brake fluid (no DOT 4 in town) back to the bike and got to work. We installed the new line without much difficulty. We had to reuse the old copper compression washers since we didn't see any in town. Hopefully these don't leak before we have a chance to install a fresh OEM part.

Next we bled the brake lines. First we bled the master cylinder, quick and easy. We moved to the right caliper next. Tiny bubbles were coming out at this nipple for the better part of an hour. Because bleeding for this long requires so much fluid, after the first 1/4 liter of fluid that we bled out into an old water bottle as old/spent fluid, we moved the bleed hose to drain back into the fresh bottle of brake fluid we had just bought so that we could just recycle it back into the reservoir when the reservoir got low. Finally the right caliper was producing no bubbles so we moved to the left caliper and then back up to the master cylinder.

In the end, while my bum foot means we can't fully test it yet, it seems the front brake is back in order!

Thanks again for the advice!

Jeff (and Si)
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Old 04-08-2013, 10:28 PM   #6
Hamish71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden View Post
Hey that's cool!

Never heard of a "joiner"....

Once the joiner is installed can the "angle" of the banjo fittings one-to-the-other be adjusted, or is that a "one-time" deal that has to be done at installation?
Nope, can adjust. the female joiner is just a hex shaped threaded pipe. http://www.brakeconnect.com/tube-joiners
Can back off and tighten to suit the right angles.

Pleased to see the OP is on his way.
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