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Old 10-19-2012, 09:36 AM   #91
rudolf35 OP
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Onward

OK, so the rods are in, the cam followers are in so it is piston, cylinder and head time.

Now, I will bounce back and forth between the R and L in the pictures but I did the same thing for both sides.

Following Snowbums sage advice, I opted to mount the pistons in their respective cylinder (arrow forward) and then mount them on the studs. So, to start the process I cleaned the base alloy shim(s) with MEK (I know not good for you). Once the MEK was evaporated I gave a light coating of Yamabond to one side of the alloy shim(s). While doing this, I was mindful to keep only a light coat around the stud holes so that no Yamabond will squeeze out and into the oil passages.


Yamabond on alloy shim

Once that was done, I hung the alloy shim on the studs to dry; but not shoved all the way to the case. While the Yamabond dried down, I put a light film of Yamabond on the base of the cylinders; again mindful not to get to much on there so it can not squeeze out. After that, it was time to fit the pistons in their respective cylinders; mindful of the 120 degree spacing of the gaps!


Ready to mount pistons in cylinder

Once the rings and pistons where seated it was time to put them on the studs and run the wrist pin home.


Wrist pin mounting time

At this point I retrieved one pin at a time, out of the freezer, wiped with MEK and then oiled it. I also applied a light oiling to the connecting rod. To make things go a bit smoother, I took a gas torch and heated the area around the wrist pin mount so it would expand a bit (just very warm to the touch). Surprisingly it all worked out just as planned, the pins slid into position with a tight but not jammed feel. Once the pins where in the right place I mounted new wrist pin clips and pushed the cylinder home.


Going home



Cylinder in place

With the cylinders in place I then placed the head gaskets, writing visible, on the cylinders and seated the respective cylinder heads in position. Now it was time to turn my attention to the little round seals that sit at below the rocker mounting blocks. The ones in the heads looked good but I am there so I might as well change them out. This is a simple matter of a blade lifting them out of position and sliding new ones in place.


Rocker block "O" ring coming off


All four off and ready to get dumped

With the "O" rings replaced I placed the push rods and mounted up the rockers. Now since I was running out of wrench time, I did not opt to torque the heads down and besides that I have to still align them (the cylinders where all the way down and seated and the heads where mounted and the nuts just finger tight on the studs - so things could not warp).

IMG_0019
Ready for aligning and torque

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Old 10-24-2012, 04:26 AM   #92
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Talking Bit more head work

OK, the heads are on and now it is time to adjust the rockers endplay. Again, going with Snowbum's ideas, I opted to fabricate two 1/8" washers, so that they fit on the top and bottom of each rocker shaft. The idea being, that the washer surrounds the rocker shaft, with the shaft below the top of the washer. With that setup a clamp can be fitted holding the washer to the rockers without pushing on the rocker shafts; the end effect being that the rocker blocks are square to each other and to the head. The pressure on the clamp should be snug not so tight that the shafts bind (snug the clamp and make sure the rockers move freely).


Ready to modify the 1/8" thick washer


Modified washer and clamp

Once I had the washers modified to fit, I placed a washer on the top and bottom of the rocker blocks and clamped the whole thing down snug; sufficient pressure to hold things together and squared up the rocker blocks but not so much pressure that the spring washer on the rocker shaft is under pressure - the rocker should move freely even clamped.


Mounted washers and rocker

At this point the nuts ontop of the clamped rocker where snugged down by hand; just sufficient to hold the blocks in position. After that I did the other rocker, for that cylinder, and then torqued the head down to 25ftlbs (did that in stages; 10ftlbs then to 25ftlbs) in the pattern shown in the Clymer manual.


Left cylinder is done

After I had the left and right heads mounted it was time to install the clutch. Now some would say use a new clutch since I am in there. But, my old clutch was just a tiny bit off the stock thickness so there was no reason to replace a perfectly good friction disk.


Clutch time


Ready to install the clutch


Clutch mounted and held in compression with nuts and bolts


Clutch bolt spacers in place

After the clutch was mounted up, but still keeping the bolts only finger tight, it was time to center the disks. Since I do not own a clutch alignment tool, I opted to use the next best thing, the transmission (since the motor is out of the bike it was easy task). Gently inserting the transmission input shaft into the clutch, I could feel the disk slowly line up. Just to make very sure I pushed the transmission home and gently tightened the bolts the hold the transmission to the motor down; all the while hearing the clutch spring popping.


Ready to lineup the clutch


Rotating the works

After the clutch had been lined up, the transmission was placed in top gear and then with two old drive shaft bolts I rotated the output shaft just to make sure that the whole thing not binding. Probably a useless step but it gave me a "warm fuzzy" feeling to know. With all that done, it was time to again remove the transmission and then torque down the clutch cover bolts to hold everything in place.


Been a while since it looked like this


Just enjoying the view

Now that the motor and transmission are ready, as far as I know, it is time to line up the "extra" hands to mount everything into the waiting frame. Probably could do it myself but I promised to wait since my help wanted to see it going together. Probably a good thing so that I go a bit slower and not muck things up.

Cigar and coffee time
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rudolf35 screwed with this post 10-24-2012 at 08:33 AM
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Old 10-24-2012, 07:37 AM   #93
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On tightening rocker blocks I always want to make sure that there is room for oil between the block and the rocker arm so I use a small feeler gauge ( 2-3 thous ) between the block and the rocker arm, then using hand pressure only squeeze the top and bottom blocks together so they are tight up against the feeler gauge, then tighten the bolts.

When I take these appart and see the wear marks on the blocks where the rocker arm rubs against them doesn't make sense to me. That is telling me the pieces are too tight and oil can't get between them.

Leaving a small gap for oil and heat expansion is not a bad idea in my mind. It also has the secondary benefit of freeing up the valve train.
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Old 10-24-2012, 08:28 AM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cycleman2 View Post
On tightening rocker blocks I always want to make sure that there is room for oil between the block and the rocker arm so I use a small feeler gauge ( 2-3 thous ) between the block and the rocker arm, then using hand pressure only squeeze the top and bottom blocks together so they are tight up against the feeler gauge, then tighten the bolts.

When I take these appart and see the wear marks on the blocks where the rocker arm rubs against them doesn't make sense to me. That is telling me the pieces are too tight and oil can't get between them.

Leaving a small gap for oil and heat expansion is not a bad idea in my mind. It also has the secondary benefit of freeing up the valve train.
Very true! That is why I use a small clamp with just sufficient pressure to hold things square but not so much pressure that it compresses the spring washer that is between the rocker and the block. The idea is to get the block square and have free movement of the rocker.
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rudolf35 screwed with this post 10-25-2012 at 06:10 AM
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:56 AM   #95
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Thumb Mount up

Since I had this sitting on the workbench, it was time to do something with it.


Engine ready to install

Having a fellow ADVer on hand it was time to "do it". Not wanting to damage the push rod tubes we opted to use two jack stands to balance the engine inside the frame. This gave us the time and free hands to install the engine mounting bolts and center/side stand spring mounts; all without pinching fingers and or hardware.


Engine on jack stands

Once the engine was secure in the frame it was time to install the transmission. Having already lined up the clutch, it was a simple matter of swinging the transmission in from the left and stabbing it into the clutch; needless to say the splines on the transmission input shaft where lubed with Honda Molly 60. After the transmission was secured to the engine, the clutch activation hardware was mounted - what a good feeling that gave to use the clutch lever and all worked as "advertised".


Neutral wire installed


Transmission mounted and clutch working


Ready for swingarm

Having mounted the transmission, it was time to go for the swingarm and drive shaft. Now this is where things got interesting; either we where tired or just plain messed up. But anyway, we mounted the swingarm, space it between the frame members and mounted up the drive shaft.


Centering swingarm

At this point we noticed that there was a lot of side to side play in the swingarm. NOW WHAT?!?! Just to make sure that we somehow did not loose the spacer/bushings in the swingarm, Rusty44 was pushing me to "just make sure". OK fine, off came the drive shaft bolts (not tight yet) and the swingarm. All was there where it should be! Having made sure that we had all the bits in place we remounted the swingarm and again centered it between the frame members - we finally figured out that we "centered" the swingarm before the pins where fully in the bosses - brain fart! Anyway, twice is always better and we finally had a centered no slop swingarm.


Running in drive shaft bolts

The then, after torquing down the drive shaft bolts, the real fun came with the mounting of the drive shaft boot - no we did not forget to slip it on before mounting the swingarm! Rusty44 and I figure it is a Teutonic revenge for doing a do it yourself project. After getting religious we finally had it over the lips and snugged down.


Teutonic revenge - a.k.a. drive shaft boot

At this point Rusty44 received "The Call" and had to heed "the one to be obeyed". No reason not to carry on, so after a cigar and espresso break I mounted the final drive and rear wheel.

IMG_0013
Final drive mounted

IMG_0016
A sight not beheld for some time - A roller

Being a full and successful day, it was time to call it day; not having broken anything was even more of a success. Some might say "why did you not go all the way and paint/PC the frame", the answer to this is simple - I have no clue yet as to the future status of the bike. Will I ride it or flip it. The idea now is to finish it, oil it up, tune it and then run it around locally and see if we "click". If we do click, then next winter I will take it down to the frame and to the "pretty" stuff; that is paint, PC, mufflers etc. Time and chemistry will tell.

A good day has been had!
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Old 10-30-2012, 07:13 PM   #96
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Old 11-02-2012, 03:57 AM   #97
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Wicked Not stalled out

Has been a week since I updated this post, but the project has not sat idle.

Since the last session I have done the following:
Installed the air box
Hooked up all the electrics
Installed the carbs
Mounted the exhaust system
Installed the coils
Charged and mounted the battery
Filled up all the needed oil cavities

So, basically the bike is ready to fire up. Right now, I will sit back and go through all the adjustments once more, cover my "6" and then fire it up.

I will post the install pictures as soon as I load them up to Flicker.

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Old 11-02-2012, 05:18 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniper X View Post
I have low sport bars on mine, and bar end mirrors, and I love both. It also still looks stock to a non R60/5 Aficionado. I have stock pipes though, and it seems everywhere I stop people, even non motorcycle types ask me about the bike and love the way it looks.



I vote for not another cafe bike and since MOST of the stock stuff is there, try to find a set of cheap aftermarket ppipes that lok stock and go from there. I kinda like the two tone paint although that was never an option on this vintage BMW.
Where did you get the low sports bars?
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Old 11-03-2012, 05:11 AM   #99
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Sport bars

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spinalcracker View Post
Where did you get the low sports bars?
Huck's; as most of the parts.
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Old 11-05-2012, 05:03 AM   #100
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Thumb End run

As noted in a few posts back, I have not stalled out just got lazy in posting images.

Anyway, after getting the engine into the frame the rest was just a simple assembly job.

The first order was completing the electrical connections. Thank the powers to be I marked all the connections so it was a simple "find the right one", lithium grease it and push it home.


Connections at the alternator


Alternator all wired up

After the alternator was wired up it was the starters turn to rejoin the wiring harness; no big deal either. After these connections where made the starter cover was mounted; starting to look like a complete engine.


Starter cover on

Once the starter parts where mounted it was the carburetors turn to be mounted. I had rebuilt the carburetors prior to the engine going "Bang" so there was no need to muck with them - mounted the cables, set the slack and did not muck with the adjustments since it ran at the time of the "Bang".


Carburetors mounted

Having mounted the carburetors, it was time for the battery, air filter housing and coils. All that went rather smooth save the battery. I had obtained the battery back in March and it was not tended to (my error) since. Well, the place where I obtained the battery still showed it in warranty and without issue exchanged it; I was glad I obtained the battery locally.


Engine closed up and almost ready to fire

After going over everything again I oiled up all the oil needing cavities and tuned the engine over via the kick starter to get some oil into the pump (might not be needed but it gave me a more relaxed state of mind knowing that the oil is at least in the pump and ready to be pushed around).

Once the tank was loaded up with a gallon of fresh gas it was time to test the muses. The taps where opened to reserve, due to a dry fuel system I gave the throttle a couple of fast twists and then with the ignition on gave the starter button a jab. The engine caught and with a little coaxing of the throttle settled into a nice 1000RPM idle.

Success to this point was not going to go unpunished. I noted that the oil pressure light was off, good, but the alternator light was still glowing. So, the bike was shut down, the negative terminal disconnected and the front cover removed. After some fiddling and a post to get some ideas, it turned out to be a shorted to ground alternator light. Once I rectified this and had the bike all back it was time for a test ride.

Now, remember I also rebuilt the transmission (a totally new area of mucking for me) so this was a "double" test ride - engine and transmission. Out of the garage I got in line with the road, fired up the engine and clicked it into first - success it went in nice and smooth. Slowly letting the clutch out I worked my way to the first shift point and without hesitation second went home - this is getting to be fun and addictive!

Having wound my way through all four gears, also back down, it was time to get out on the road and do some real testing. Aimed the /5 out of the neighborhood and into the world, first stop was the local gas station. After filling up I wound my way all around town and known roads to test the bike and to stop off at a local Indi BMW shop just to have a goal and to see if he can hear anything wrong. After the Indi looked the bike over and noting that I need to reverse the springs in the front brake (I got them mixed up), the bike got a clean bill of health with the caveat that the valves should be checked and the carburetors reset for the post rebuild.

On the way back to the house I did note that the alternator light was still on very dim. Once back home I noted to myself "stuff it" and ordered the EuroMotoElectrics Bosh Alternator Plus kit. Since from all I could tell this bike is a keeper I might as well do it right and get the whole charging system refreshed. Also, for $159 shipped it is a good insurance for my peace of mind. Some might wonder why not go to a bigger output setup, well the bike will have no extra loads on it since it will not be a tourer. I see it as my local run around and short day trip bike.

After I receive the alternator tune up kit my next target for "refresh" will be in the headlight. The PO managed to get things working alright but mucked up the wiring to get there.

IMG_0007
The "nest"

But the nest will be my winter project. I will go back semi stock with a nail and all that fun.

Cigar and tequila time

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Old 11-12-2012, 04:44 AM   #101
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We have electicity

The goodies from MotoEuroElectics arrived rather quickly and I wasted no time drooling over them.


Rotor, voltage regulator, brushes and diode board


Once done drooling over the new parts it was time to remove the old brushes. Now taking off the brush holder looks easy, which it is, if one has a small 7mm ring spanner. I have plenty of small spanners but each one was just the right length to not allow removal of the inner stator nuts.


Houston we have a spanner length problem

No problem! Nothing a cutoff wheel can not cure


Creating a short ring spanner



Custom spanner in action

Having been warned that the left side of the brush holder is isolated from the stator I made sure to keep the order of insulating washers and washers right.

Mounting the brushes was the most challenging of the whole install (yes, I could have soldered on ring terminals to make future brush changes easier; but what the heck). The general idea is to solder the brush wires in place without letting solder "creep" up the wires and making them stiff. After digging out the old weighted clip stand it was a simple matter of de-soldering and soldering the new brushes in place. I did note that the new brushes had no insulating covers over the wires; as the stock ones had. So, just before soldering them in place I cut a short length of shrink tubing and slipped it over the wires; leaving sufficient room to solder and once mounted sufficient room to not bind the wires - leaving room for the brushes to move freely in the holders.

Having the replace the brushes the real work was done. The rest was a simple matter of bolting items in place; first of which was the new rotor.


New rotor

After the new rotor was in place, the new diode board and voltage regulator where bolted in place. At this point it was show time. The tank was remounted, leaving the front cover off, and the negative cable was attached - show time. Fired up the engine and with the multi-meter attached to the battery I checked the warmed up idle voltage.


Not bad at 1000RPM idle

I failed to take a picture but at 3000RPM the multi-meter showed 14.2v; success! After the voltage check it was time to final assemble the bike. Again removing negative terminal, getting good at this, I installed the front cover and the horn. Once all the parts where back on the bike a posterity photo of the mileage was taken so I have a permanent record.


Rebuild mileage

Yes, the mileage is low; the PO had the speedometer rebuilt and I have no clue of the real mileage (strange though that during the speedometer rebuilt the needles where not replaced). Having buttoned up the bike it was time to see how it behaves on the road.

Took the /5 out for a good shake down run. After the first 100 miles it was evident that I again had a dependable bike on my hands and that it was time to think about the "look good" items. The first on my list is the crossover pipe between the headers. The one in place is a old alloy pipe that has a few spots where the exhaust gases leak from - nothing a plumbing connector pipe can not cure (chrome and the right size, 1.25").


Rest/show off stop at the local BMW shop

Being at the "look good" stage of the project it is now time to ponder the future of the R50-6/5. I know my seat is shot (pan and bad cover job) and I have been eying the Siebenbrock seats. But I was made aware of the Boxer Works SWB round cafe seats. The price for the Siebenbrock is the better part of $400 and the Boxer Works glass cafe round tail would run around $250. Now keeping in mind that I will not change the mufflers (grown rather fond of the home made look) the round back cafe seat (in black) and a small fly screen sounds appealing. Going back to stock would be easy, no frame or parts butchered, so the Boxer Cafe route does shine - at this point. For now, I will just ride the bike and smile all the way when people are confused over the age.
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Old 11-13-2012, 06:33 AM   #102
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Thumb Crossed over

The crossover pipe between the headers has been bothering me for some time and I still thought that it might (no kidding) cause carb tune issues.

Without to much ado I headed to the local hardware emporium and purchased a 12" chromed brass sink drain pipe; $8.50 out the door. Once back at the house I cut the threaded portions off; nothing a pipe cutter could not handle. Once the threads where gone, I cut a 1.5" long slot into the opposite ends of the pipe. This gave the pipe a little room to expand and slip more easily on and off the stubs on the headers.

After mounting the new crossover pipe equipped headers on to the heads, it was time to tend to the joint; did not want a leak on the new joints (as the old one had). Looking at the old crossover pipe as a source for a wrapper around the new joint I cut off two 2" pieces. Once cleaned, I split the pieces of tubing and bent them open so they slip over the new crossover pipe. I lined up the expansion slot, in the crossover pipe, so it faces the motor. Once I had that done, the slit in the wrapper was lined up towards the front and I made sure the length of the expansion slit was fully covered. At that point a hose clamp was fitted to each wrapped joint puling the wrapper tight to the expansion joint.

Test time - the crossover pipe was cleaned with alcohol, get all the grease and stuff off, and the engine was fired up. Right away I could hear that the joints where tight and no gases where escaping. I also noted, after the engine came up to temp, that the idle was smoother and it reved a little better. As I had figured, the leaking joints gave me some maladjusted carbs. With the engine being up to temp I adjusted the carbs which resulted in a nice smooth idle - road test is the only way to test it fully but that will have to wait until the morning.

IMG_0001
New crossover pipe

Only two more nargles to tend to: rotate drive shaft boot and switch front brake springs around.

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rudolf35 screwed with this post 11-14-2012 at 04:24 AM
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Old 11-19-2012, 09:25 AM   #103
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Talking 250 mile urban test

Having a long weekend, I thought it might be a good time to test the /5. The whole weekend resulted in a 250 mile run all over the DfW area taking care of normal weekend duties (wife, work etc.). In all this running around, in a urban setting, the /5 worked out perfect. The gas consumption was low, would have used the spedo to figure it but that was the other item that showed up during the test run - speedometer cable gave out.


Bad phone picture

Since I have been riding motorcycles I have always hated Mickie Mouse style mirrors. So, without to much ceremony I dumped the PO's mirror and mounted two handlebar end mirrors.


Handlebar end mirrors mounted

While getting the mirrors I found a interesting little fairing that just might be added to give the "poser cafe" look of the period.


Emgo cafe fairing - another bad phone picture

So what did I learn about the /5 this weekend? I love that bike! True, it has no power, the brakes are at best OK, but all in all it is a grin maker like no other. After I replace the speedometer cable it will be ride and grin time. After the obligatory 3 to 4 months testing I will start going after the looks issues; unless something blows up.
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Old 11-19-2012, 10:42 AM   #104
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Just to be sure you know, it's a good idea to retorque the heads and adjust the valves after a few heat cycles. Things like gaskets do bed in and it causes the gaps to close up, which can burn valves. Nice build!
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:22 AM   #105
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Talking Done

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Bamboo View Post
Just to be sure you know, it's a good idea to retorque the heads and adjust the valves after a few heat cycles. Things like gaskets do bed in and it causes the gaps to close up, which can burn valves. Nice build!
The heads have been retroqued and the valves reset; did not bother to record that step; to busy riding or getting it ready to ride.
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