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Old 05-25-2011, 08:11 AM   #16
norton73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ontic View Post
I am still interested if one could try to fit GS single seat (and rear luggage rack) to the G/S frame... I imagine with a bit of work it should be possible?
Didn't try. There is a G/S solo seat/rack available, I believe from Germany.
Of course anything is possible with a welder, torch, and some time.
Someone else on this forum used a R100GS subframe on their bike, they may have some more insight than me. That was just my experiance.
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Old 05-25-2011, 08:18 AM   #17
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You can get into your settings for ADVrider and specify how many posts youd like per page. I have mine set for ten, so its kind of easy to estimate how big a thread is, based on some screwy decimal system
That might help you image load issues. Set yours for only a few posts per page to make it faster.

that was unrelated to bikes, but fixing these R80's are like an odyssey. Only you usually end up better than Odysseus
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Old 05-25-2011, 08:48 AM   #18
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Hey Norton73,
cheers, yeah, I will look into it more. But your reminder of the longer subframe potentially putting the luggage weight further back is a bit of a disincentive to me, let alone some of the other hassles. Load balance is a big issue for me.
I have looked through the options of G/SPD single seats from Siebenrock and other places, and was going to go with that option- however, I really think this tank suits the GS single seat. I've tried my (police?) solo denfeld seat from my 90/6 (which is very similar to a G/S single seat) on my G/S with this Sauer tank and it just doesn't 'work' as well as the images I posted before of the white tank.
While on their own I probably prefer the look of the G/S single seats, the GS single seat actually looks a bit more comfortable and is probably quite practical.
Anyway, I am happy to do a bit of modding and fabbing to get the thing to work if that is what I have to do. Ideally I'll be buying used and cheaper, so in the end it might be determined by what I find.

Stagehand,
thanks, with my settings as they currently are, we are now safely on page 2
My laptop blew up a while back and until I stop spending all my money on motorbike parts and replace the thing I am stuck using my partners overloaded and about-to-blow-up-as-well old laptop. It struggles sometimes.
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Old 05-25-2011, 04:52 PM   #19
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Having weight to the rear of the axle makes wheelies easier

I found out today that my main frame is snapped where the sub-frame attaches to the shock mount. The back of the shock mount came off letting my subframe hang back. I have a brace on my box racks that runs down to the passenger peg n the right but the bolt rattled loose while bashing it through the woods. All that weight tugging down on that top mount caused it to snap. I replaced the bolt on my rack an it's holding it up on it's own but I'd take it as a cautionary tale. You NEED added bracing on the sub-frame. Also, use nylox nuts everywhere! That's a lot of weight bashing down...especially if you've recently discovered the joy of jumping

If you're smart you'll make the boxes quick-release and ditch 'em when you hit the trails. If you're dumb you'll make the boxes quick-release and not ditch 'em when you hit the trails. Guess which category I fall in
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Old 05-25-2011, 09:01 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil View Post
Having weight to the rear of the axle makes wheelies easier

I found out today that my main frame is snapped where the sub-frame attaches to the shock mount. [tech blargblarg blarg].. You NEED added bracing on the sub-frame. Also, use nylox nuts everywhere! That's a lot of weight bashing down...especially if you've recently discovered the joy of jumping
Well if its not one thing its another,

oh we must see video of this <-- jumping is how you break frames, but oh yeah!
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Old 06-18-2011, 02:37 AM   #21
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A small update, part ride report,
Tank has been repaired and faired and primed.
Smooth as silk now with not a sign of dents or damage. Final priming and then painting is going to wait until I figure out what I am doing with other things to paint.

Next,
I've started collecting bits for my WP 5060 extreme front end.
A couple of adv'ers replied to my wanted post and I have pieced back together most of the front end of a 1999 KTM 400SX that they parted out between them.
Last week I went for a drive to pick up the front wheel and axle, with decent knobby tyre and a rimlock. The corrosion on the spokes cleaned up pretty well with some rustconverter stuff and a bit of scrubbing- the wheel is nice and straight and very usable.

Then a few days ago I left on the R90/6 for a two day one night ride covering about 850km's to pick up the forks and stay over at a friends place and then ride home the next day.

loaded up bright and early


pretty soon I was riding through temperatures just above 0 deg C.

later in the day, there's snow on those mountains in the distance but it can't really be seen


finally met up with the adv'er and loaded up the front end (thanks Terry!)


next it was time to ride to a friends place where I made it just before dark. We polished off some of his homebrew beer and an excellent steak and 3 veg meal he prepared, and a full bottle of Mount Gay Rum. Outside the two 1974 R90/6's caught up. Here they are the next morning.



I was feeling a little chilled and bruised from the previous days ride, but off I went again.
After a bit of rain and very chilled hands again, finally I started to make it close to home and some of my favourite local country and roads.
Here's a couple of shots in that perfect horizontal winter light, just before riding into another patch of rain,






and, after a nice sleep in I re-united the forks and the front wheel.
Man these things are FAT. Having never consciously noticed them in the flesh before, I was surprised at the sheer size of the things.



Next up I need the wheel spacer to replace the speedo drive thing (which I also didn't get)- I have bought one on ebay and will be getting it posted soon,
Then a rotor and caliper and caliper holder. Still figuring out which way to go with that. This front end came stock with a 300mm rotor but it was not available to me to purchase.
And hopefully soon a set of R-Dubbs and HPMguys triple clamps which are getting re-made.
available here.

Re-springing if required (likely) and re-valving and probably lowering to stock beemer fork height will follow at some point,

Cheers,
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Old 06-18-2011, 06:42 AM   #22
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great post and pics, Ontic. Mount Gay is one of my favorites.
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Old 06-18-2011, 07:05 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by ontic View Post
Interesting thread... but needs more weapons.






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Old 06-18-2011, 08:59 AM   #24
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Cheers Stagehand,
it is a great drop indeed. I've got a weakness for good brown spirits of many types, and for a while was quite settled on whiskey, however Mount Gay Rum has become a bit of staple nowadays for my bike rides.
Only thing is it can be a bit hard to find in some of the backwoods country towns here. And there is not much good to be said about Australian rum IMO. I think I have discovered the pattern- we have a bit of a redneck association with rum here. However, in a lot of country towns, especially redneck ones, not many 'blokes' would be naturally inclined to buy a bottle of booze labled 'Gay'
So there's the dilema. In my efforts to buy this spirit in quite a few places it seems to be a case of- a little bit redneck- not so good- they probably like a bit of rum, but not enough to really appreciate it, and thus I can't find Mount Gay anywhere. In a real good sorta-spooky redneck place- counter-intuitively- much better prospects- maybe they like their rum enough to appreciate a good one over a shit one and not care about the lable?
I dunno, it is just a theory that seems to play out.


Lornce,
Thats a very nice, finely looked after and maintained lump of metal and timber! I'm not much into guns or weapons myself. I have no objection to the them for hunting, for food or necessary pest control, but in my country at least I see little reason for handguns. I do know better than to try to argue this point with someone from North America
As far as weapons go, in my thread one will have to be happy with badly wielded tools doing damage to undeserving bike parts, and collapsable fishing rods damaging fish.

Heres a bit from my 6 week ride over christmas/new year to keep both you and Stagehand happy

Fishing for trout on the Thredbo River,
I get lucky,


weapons and ammunition used


Venhill featherlite clutch cables are excellent- especially when they break after a few thousand Km's in the middle of nowhere and you thank your lucky stars that you brought your old one. What they are excellent for is stashing in your pack for later unthreading and using the stainless steel wire to stitch a freshly caught and cured trout to a stick


Of course, for a slow smoke it is nice to have something else to cook up.


Of course, by the time it was smoke up, some bastard had finished the rum.


So, I had to pack up camp, take my trout and find another bottle of brown spirits for my next camp (had to settle for Jamesons in that particular town).


Cheers,
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Old 06-18-2011, 09:07 AM   #25
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Fantastic tale and pictures!


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Old 06-18-2011, 10:55 PM   #26
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Jeez Ontic , brilliant mate ! I'm going to have to quiz you about the intricacies of airhead dirt bike construction though .This is all about suspension travel ? How much extra ? What are the ubeaut clamps for ?



On the subject of headers , have a look at this ....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cquCf...layer_embedded
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Old 06-19-2011, 12:19 AM   #27
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Jeez Ontic , brilliant mate ! I'm going to have to quiz you about the intricacies of airhead dirt bike construction though .This is all about suspension travel ? How much extra ? What are the ubeaut clamps for ?



On the subject of headers , have a look at this ....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cquCf...layer_embedded
Hi mate, thanks,
I'm far from an expert regarding these intricacies and am purely stumbling my way through things bit by bit.
It has taken me a long time to develop a plan, and I still haven't finished that plan yet- it is enough to get started though.

regarding the front end- first some background-
I was not very happy with mine as it came to me. It was way too soft for my liking, diving hard under braking, and kinda floppy feeling all over, and this was just riding with a small tank and no other loading on the bike. As I looked into things I found that many consider these front forks to be a little underbuilt- especially for loaded down touring.
Anyway, I looked into improving things. I could have tried for stiffer springs, for race-tech gold valve cartridge emulator thingies, for a stiffer billet upper triple clamp (unlike your 80ST which I believe came with a proper upper triple clamp the G/S one is just flimsy stamped steel), for a fork brace, etc, etc. Some people seem happy with this sort of outcome. This didn't seem optimum for me as I was rapidly loosing my drive to 'keep the bike as stock as possible' and wanted to go for a better end result. Also, things like my G/S front wheel wanting a respoke and general rebuild steered me away from sticking with this front end. Getting it working like I wanted would likely have been very expensive.

Next I started heading towards doing a GS Marzocchi front end swap. These have a much better reputation and are considered by many to be a good bang-for-buck plug-and-play upgrade. Of course, unless I wanted to work out custom axles and whatnot to fit my G/S wheel (which still needed work), the whole front end from a GS is required, wheel and all- and this too was looking to be very expensive to source. Also, it was looking like to get the most out of these forks a re-spring and gold valve might also be a good idea. More $$$. I did start going down this route though and came a hairs breadth from buying forks from German Ebay which fell through at the last minute.

After a lot more reading and gradually overcoming my trepidation to attempt anything greater than a simple 'plug-and-play' option I decided to go for a WP Extreme 50mm conventional fork swap.
The timing of this decision concided nicely with Solo Lobo having started his Unholy Union thread
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=676340
and he has been a great help through many PM's in talking me through this

While I have largely overcome any inclination to keep this G/S stock, or even 'bmw' in all its parts, one thing I haven't managed to get over is my aversion to USD forks on an old airhead like this. It is silly, but they just look wrong to me, and conventionals just look right...
So, the 50mm WP's seemed like a good workable option. Of course the net is full of opinion going in just about any direction you could want- but there seems to be a fair few people who think these forks are some of the best conventional forks ever made... I don't know about that, but at the very least they should represent a significant enough upgrade to start to justify the money that was going to be spent on any option. They will need some tuning and re-working, probably new springs and re-shimming the valves.
But, they are reasonably modern big stiff forks with adjustable compression and rebound.

At first I plan to limit the full extension of the forks to keep them at the stock bmw height in order to maintain the 'right' geometry. This is a relatively simple operation of changing spacers inside the fork and is completely reversable. Solo Lobo goes over this in his thread.
Later, if I wish to extend the swing arm, then I will re-extend the front forks. I have no rush on that and plan to get it well set up at stock height first. If I extend the rear it will mean re-springing my Ohlins rear shock and also changing things like centre and side stands, so I want to be sure I want to go that route. That may be round two of the build.

Now, those ubeaut clamps (the R-Dubb ones right?) are for fitting these forks to the bmw. With a bit of work (again gone over in Solo's thread) it is possible to use the KTM triples, but these have much smaller offset than the huge 38mm bmw offset. Using the R-Dubb triples allows one to basically preserve the same bmw steering geometry.


Anyway, there is the background and the justification. All up this front end is going to be expensive (a bit more than the other two options), but so was the rear shock, and the rear shock upgrade deserves a good front end upgrade!
This will be the first time I have tried anything like this, so aside from hoping to gain some significant performance improvements, I am also just in this for enjoyment and experience to see a project like this through from beginning to end.
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:29 AM   #28
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Any plans to up the berries - they are gutless stock.

I'm watching your front end set up as I keep blowing up mine.
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Old 06-19-2011, 02:15 AM   #29
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Any plans to up the berries - they are gutless stock.

I'm watching your front end set up as I keep blowing up mine.
I've thought about it but won't be going down that path yet. Once this is all back together and tuned-in well, I will look into it a bit further. If I found a bargain siebenrock power-up kit, of course I wouldn't say no (and I do peruse german ebay for these occasionally), but, until then I may just wait for these 'berries' to wear themselves out, or my bank account to grow.
I don't mind leaving that as a good treat to give myself at a later date if I ever grow a little bored with this bike.

About the front end,
Cheers, wish me luck
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Old 06-19-2011, 05:40 AM   #30
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You always have options with a G/S. Great platform for building whatever you want.

Yes, you can add the early GS subframe and get the solo seat...works best with the extended swing arm for weight distribution. Strengthen the gussets before powder coating

Or use the stock G/S set up..get the solo seat/frame from Germany..look on eBay for specific R80G/S parts...they should show up.

If you have a good welder, he can move the brake caliper castings on the fork lower so you can fit a GS caliper or other aftermarket setup. Must be careful since the aluminum tube can twist if too much heat for too long.

You've got a great start so have fun trying things until you get what you like!

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