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Old 07-22-2011, 10:46 AM   #61
henrymartin OP
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Originally Posted by MacNoob View Post
Lookin' good. I got here a bit late to kibitz on the foam and glass though. You can't use any polyester resin on some foams - it'll melt them right down as you found out! So you head off to the marine supply place and get epoxy resin. Doesn't melt the foam, and doesn't stink as bad. As filler, you get a bag of glass microballoons (basically, tiny hollow glass spheres the size of dust) and mix that with a little epoxy. Use that instead of bondo.
Good tip for the next one

Now where were you when I needed you. The foam I used last (pink insulation) did better. I ended up wrapping it in masking tape before laying mat/resin down, and the only issue I had was the heat the resin generated curing fused the tape to the glass.

I also ended up not using Bodo anymore, as it gave me more problems than anything I ever used. instead, I skimcoated the whole thing (after sanding with 80 grit) with Evercoat Lite filler, sanded with drywall sanding sheet (does not clog), then hit it with etching primer, and a filler primer. Wetsanded that, sprayed a sealer. It was a lot of work. next time, I'll probably just make a mold and a plug, and that will make it easier/smoother. Freehanding the mat over compound curves with a few minutes working time is a pain.

I guess epoxies are good, I just never used them. Then again, this was my first fiberglass project. The one benefit is that there will not be another one like it
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Old 07-25-2011, 06:25 AM   #62
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Rear shocks



By the way: How hard is it to do the valves on these bikes? I've never done valves with shims. Clymer's mentions a special tool is needed - is that true?
Thanks
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Old 07-25-2011, 07:49 AM   #63
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The valves aren't hard to do, you just need some patience.
You do need a tool to compress the spring/bucket assembly and a nice magnet helps to remove the shim.
Here's a pic of the tool.

I pilferred this pic from Dennis Kirk where this tool is available for about 15 bucks.
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Old 07-25-2011, 08:49 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by brucifer View Post
The valves aren't hard to do, you just need some patience.
You do need a tool to compress the spring/bucket assembly and a nice magnet helps to remove the shim.
Here's a pic of the tool.

I pilferred this pic from Dennis Kirk where this tool is available for about 15 bucks.
The first bike I ever did valves on that I can remember was my 1979 CB750 f and it was quite easy. Although since it had 16 and I checked every one, it took a couple hours. There is a method, you check clearance, look at a guide in the manual that tells you what shim to buy to get the clearance back to spec, and make a list of what shim is needed, and where it goes. Of course those that measure in spec do not need to be changed out and sometimes you get lucky and have a shim that needs to be changed that will work on another valve.
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Old 07-25-2011, 08:51 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
Hmm...haven't considered red. I'm kinda going for an old school look, hence the "Bahama blue" and "Oxford white" scheme of things. White frame, white seat , black rims, pipe, airbox, forks, light bucket, mirrors.

I think the center line will flow nicely with the seat coming up against the tank. Of course, I'll have to shape to foam to flow with the scheme.

Hey, thanks for the compliments. It means a lot coming from a guy who was against the changing of things. I mean it.
I do like the way it is turning out, so can I have the tail fin now?
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Old 07-25-2011, 11:03 AM   #66
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I do like the way it is turning out, so can I have the tail fin now?
Would you give me enough time to put it together...lamps don't have to be done on schedule I assume. Hmm..I could rush it if I had the time and money for some stuff I need.
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Old 07-25-2011, 04:24 PM   #67
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Nice project, I am really loving that custom seat it came with
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Old 07-25-2011, 08:09 PM   #68
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Nice project, I am really loving that custom seat it came with
Be careful whom you tease. One day, when you come to NH, you might wake up in the morning with that very same seat mounted onto your Wee.That seat will cure your long-distance blues
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Old 07-26-2011, 09:26 AM   #69
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Be careful whom you tease. One day, when you come to NH, you might wake up in the morning with that very same seat mounted onto your Wee.That seat will cure your long-distance blues
I wouldn't complain at all if that happened, a seat and handlebar risers is what is holding me back
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Old 07-27-2011, 02:01 PM   #70
Dave in Wi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucifer View Post
The valves aren't hard to do, you just need some patience.
You do need a tool to compress the spring/bucket assembly and a nice magnet helps to remove the shim.
Here's a pic of the tool.

I pilferred this pic from Dennis Kirk where this tool is available for about 15 bucks.
I'd recommend the genuine Honda tools, that's what I used on my F bikes. It's still available, I can dig up the part number if you want it.
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Old 07-27-2011, 07:36 PM   #71
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I'd recommend the genuine Honda tools, that's what I used on my F bikes. It's still available, I can dig up the part number if you want it.
Thanks for the offer. I'm good for now.

In other news, the frame is finally dry (I think) and is currently hanging from my garage ceiling. I just went over any welds with an extra coat of paint on a small brush, just in case. The welds are numerous and are prone to rusting.
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Old 07-30-2011, 06:28 PM   #72
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CB750F Project: Part VII


I finally made some progress.

After messing with paint for weeks, I started on partial reassembly today.

First on the chopping block were the front forks. The seals did not leak, but since I had it apart, I decided to replace them anyway. And a good decision it was. The seals in there were probably the original set, and they were extremely hard. It took a few shots of PB Blaster and a warm cloth on the exterior, along with heavy prying to get them out. After that, I washed all parts with a solvent (I used brake cleaner, taking care not to damage O-rings and plastic rings), then blew out debris with compressed air, wiped everything clean, and reassembled. Damper-rod bolts received new copper washers, and a thin coat of RTV sealant.

I then reinstalled the centerstand in the frame, and proceeded with engine installation. I still have to do valves, take off side covers for polishing, and a few other things, but working on the engine will be easier if it is in the frame instead of laying on the floor. Engine installation is usually a 2-3 men job, but since the frame was completely stripped, I was able to position the engine on a piece of foam insulation (2" board, to prevent damage), set the approximate angle at which it rests in the frame, and slide the frame over/under it. It took a lot of careful wiggling and moving around, but I was able to set it just right. I then attached the engine to the frame and torqued all fasteners to the rights specs. With front forks installed, it was easy to lift the rear and kick the centerstand down, thus resting the frame with engine in it in the upright position.

To prevent the frame from falling forward while working on the rear, I temporarily reinstalled the front wheel. This allows the frame to stand up on the centerstand without falling over.

I then reinstalled the rear swingarm, with fresh lube of course. At this point -- engine mounted, steering head installed, front forks fixed and installed, swingarm installed, the rear shocks installed -- I attached the new handlebars and the fuse block.


Being nosy, I mocked up the tank and the tail section, which in turn allowed me to put the seatpan in place, and mark where I need to fabricate its fastening system. At the same time, I marked where to cut the seat foam, and next week I'll start on completing the seat.
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Old 07-31-2011, 05:14 PM   #73
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That tail came out VERY well. I'm also a big fan of the whale tail, but you've given your bike a real nice, sleek shape with your custom work. Colors are great too. Can't wait to see the final product!
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:53 AM   #74
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Thanks.

I'm now struggling with the damage done by a 20 year old brake fluid and everything seized and leaking. I have a rebuild kit on order and will tackle the brakes as soon as it arrives. In the mean time, I have to reinstall all the wiring and start on the seat. I'll document the seat process as a few of you were interested in that.
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Old 08-02-2011, 05:38 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
'm now struggling with the damage done by a 20 year old brake fluid and everything seized and leaking.


I know of what you speak on those brakes.

Thankfully they are a real easy system to work on. My suggestion is if everything is still togther work on getting all the pistons to move. I've had to use a C-clamp and blocks of wood to hold pistons that move, and use the hydralics to force stuck pistons to move, the idea is that you want to get the pistons to move, but you don't want them to pop out.

If you have already taken the system apart, you may find that when the loose piston comes out that it's near immpossible to get the stuck one out.

The process that has worked for me over the years.
Again with the C-clamp push the now freed piston back into the caliper, just enough for it to seal against both seals.
Then using your force of choice, I use an air compressor with a blow nozzle and a rubber tip)
Get the other piston to pop out.

Sometimes these things comeout with a bit of force, so use a rag to keep the pistons from getting damaged.

Dental picks work very well to clean the grove of the piston seals after you get every thing out.
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