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Old 06-29-2011, 05:00 PM   #16
vtwin
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See if you can jump across the clutch safety switch. If that doesn't work, maybe the sidestand switch. The light should be on for the sidestand if it's down. To elimnate it, put it on the centerstand and raise the kickstand to turn out the light. If that works, the switch should be ok. I suspect the clutch switch though.
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Old 06-30-2011, 06:20 AM   #17
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Turns out that you are correct, VTwin. I jumped across the clutch safety switch and the bike wants to start. (Weak battery is all that prevented it from starting.)

Decided I'd better check the front brake light switch since it is the exact same switch and discovered that the brake light does not respond to lever movement either. Looks like both have died, but clearly I can't jump the brake light switch. Fortunately, it's a less than $10 part.
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Old 06-30-2011, 06:26 AM   #18
yooperbikemike
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Nice bike! I always wondered why Suzuki didn't do more with the Tempter motor. Would have made a much better entry-level cruiser than the Savage.
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Old 06-30-2011, 07:16 AM   #19
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Nice bike! I always wondered why Suzuki didn't do more with the Tempter motor. Would have made a much better entry-level cruiser than the Savage.
That's a good question. I thought for a time that it might be the cost of manufacturing the engine, but then remembered that the GR was in the low $2k range when it was new. Not much difference I would guess.

Have only ridden around the cul-de-sac on it (still working on title and registration) but the engine feels pretty strong. Far different from the Radian I used to have, but that's to be expected going from an in-line four to a parallel twin.
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Old 07-01-2011, 04:46 PM   #20
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I had an '84 GR650 for about 10 years before trading it in a few years back for a Thruxton - worst mistake ever. I keep checking the local ads hoping to see it show up so I can buy it back. The oem R&Rs have a tendency to die - worth checking voltages to see if it's on its way out.

Have fun with the Tempter.

Cheers,

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Old 07-01-2011, 04:50 PM   #21
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Got it on the road today! Still a few minor things to tweek, but it is mine, it runs and stops correctly and I
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:06 PM   #22
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Great find, you really brought back some memories. Seems like one of the magazines of the day did a project bike build on one of these. As a vertical twin they were pretty high tech for their time. I'm envious, looks like a neat project plus you got the much faster wire spoke wheel version Seems like the hot set-up was a PBI countershaft sprocket which lowered the H/W rpms without losing any power to speak of.

Good luck w/ the project.

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Old 07-01-2011, 06:22 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by motoretro View Post
Great find, you really brought back some memories. Seems like one of the magazines of the day did a project bike build on one of these. As a vertical twin they were pretty high tech for their time. I'm envious, looks like a neat project plus you got the much faster wire spoke wheel version Seems like the hot set-up was a PBI countershaft sprocket which lowered the H/W rpms without losing any power to speak of.

Good luck w/ the project.

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Cycle World claims it was a "Best Buy" at the time. Has the counterbalancer, oil jets under the pistons, cool free-wheeling flywheel, mono shock rear. D model has air adjustable fork preload.
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Old 07-03-2011, 09:03 AM   #24
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Every time I see a GR I get fired up to work on mine.... So many bikes so little time/money. I recently sold off some motorcycles, there was a little interest in the GR. But there is something about the stance... I refuse to let her go until I finish her. Everyone who sees it loves it... Guess it was introduced a little late to capture enough of the american market. I also happen to have a good portion of a parts bike if you need anything...
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Old 07-03-2011, 08:20 PM   #25
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Every time I see a GR I get fired up to work on mine.... So many bikes so little time/money. I recently sold off some motorcycles, there was a little interest in the GR. But there is something about the stance... I refuse to let her go until I finish her. Everyone who sees it loves it... Guess it was introduced a little late to capture enough of the american market. I also happen to have a good portion of a parts bike if you need anything...
Interesting. Got the rear brake pedal and pillion grab bar? Headlight brackets?

Shoot me a PM.

One of the PO's welded a homemade backrest on the bike and it wouldn't hurt my feelings to get rid of it.

At some point, it was struck by a car and the rear brake pedal got bent.

Other than that, this old gal is in pretty decent shape now.

I identified another issue that I have to deal with. Apparently the O-rings between the cylinder heads and the carbs are a weak link and I need to replace them. Sucking air in around the boots and causing a lot of issues with popping and stumbling.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:42 AM   #26
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Pulled the carb intake boots today so I could install new o-rings. The old o-rings were like day-old spaghetti. Hard and crunchy. Crumbled as soon soon as I tried to manipulate them.

The carb boots showed a lot of carbon on the flanges, so I figure they had been leaking for a while.
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Old 07-06-2011, 11:44 AM   #27
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Seems like this will make a good daily rider- Good original bike, only issues you've encountered seem to be from sitting or the couple of drops it's had. Perfect size engine as well. Nice project!
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Old 07-06-2011, 07:17 PM   #28
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Seems like this will make a good daily rider- Good original bike, only issues you've encountered seem to be from sitting or the couple of drops it's had. Perfect size engine as well. Nice project!
I think so, if I can get the bugs worked out. I'm not much of a mechanic, so I have to learn what I am doing, while doing it. A member of a Suzuki specific forum has offered to stop by and give it a once over for me.

Figure he can point me in the right direction on some of the issues. It is at the very least, an exercise in developing patience.
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Old 07-10-2011, 11:18 AM   #29
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No one else ....

has asked about the tires, so I will. How old are they? Doesn't matter that they hold air and have tread. If they are more than 5 years I'd give serious thought to replacing them, before finding out that they don't stop or turn well enough. YMMV

The brake pedal will straighten out easily with heat (won't do much for the chrome but .... Take some measurements for where the actual pedal needs to be compared to the surface where it attaches to the pivot rod (so that it clears the engine case), take it off and drop by anywhere that does welding, they can make it work. I'd mark the end of the pivot shaft where the "split" in the lever is so that you only have to put it on once when you get it back.

Looks like a fun project, especially so with almost all the parts already there. I think that with some patience and time (plus a hack saw and a file or two) you could make the sissy bar go away and have the grab bar look like new again. Nice thing about aluminum is that it can usually be polished back to look original. Remember to chalk your files before working on aluminum or they will quickly be covered with hard to remove chunks. Your engine cases and covers were probably clear coated when new, they will poish up nicer than they looked new but you will have to then decide whether to recoat them (makes them a little dull) or keep on polishing. Have fun.

Bruce
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Old 07-11-2011, 05:25 AM   #30
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has asked about the tires, so I will. How old are they? Doesn't matter that they hold air and have tread. If they are more than 5 years I'd give serious thought to replacing them, before finding out that they don't stop or turn well enough. YMMV

The brake pedal will straighten out easily with heat (won't do much for the chrome but .... Take some measurements for where the actual pedal needs to be compared to the surface where it attaches to the pivot rod (so that it clears the engine case), take it off and drop by anywhere that does welding, they can make it work. I'd mark the end of the pivot shaft where the "split" in the lever is so that you only have to put it on once when you get it back.

Looks like a fun project, especially so with almost all the parts already there. I think that with some patience and time (plus a hack saw and a file or two) you could make the sissy bar go away and have the grab bar look like new again. Nice thing about aluminum is that it can usually be polished back to look original. Remember to chalk your files before working on aluminum or they will quickly be covered with hard to remove chunks. Your engine cases and covers were probably clear coated when new, they will poish up nicer than they looked new but you will have to then decide whether to recoat them (makes them a little dull) or keep on polishing. Have fun.

Bruce
I plan on replacing the tires when/if I get the bike running correctly. The front looks fairly new, but the rear has some issues. I'm running them only at low speeds in the neighborhood so I can test out the carbs. Once it runs correctly..they are gond.

Took a propane torch to the brake pedal and straightened it out so it is at least useable, but I'm thinking your plan works better. Can't seem to get it hot enough with propane to get it where I want it.

Have seen the grab rails for for $20 on e-bay, and given the time needed to remove the weld...not sure about tackling it with a file. I'll have to think about that.

I've seen some threads on here with the cases stripped of clear coat and polish. I may go that route. Have a very nice Porter-Cable polisher that needs a workout once in a while.
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