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Old 07-22-2011, 10:17 AM   #61
racki OP
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Day 19

That was the day of flat tyre. On John’s bike of course. 20 km into the day he got flat front.



I got the tools out, changed the tube and off we went. Two track dirt road took us to the next city, where John was supposed to fix tube and keep it as a spare. Of course we forgot about that and I thought there was one more in my bags anyway. Road out of the city was a massacre – the worst so far. Wide gravel road with super intense washboard. Super hot, flat valley some 20 km wide, locked between two mountain ranges.



Cow didn't make it:



Of course John got second flat... And of course there was no second tube in my bag. There were three spare rears though! I took the wrong one by mistake. But no hope was lost! I took the patches as well for such occasion. The problem is I don’t really know how to use them, so I wasted most of them for trial and error.



I even tried to fit rear at the front, but it got pinched by the tyre so that didn’t work. At the end I tried patch no 12 while John hopped on my bike and went to the nearest well for some more water. He took second tube to see if anyone can help. Of course some local guy had patches and fixed it for him! Mongols are so helpful, sometimes it’s hard to believe. While I was doing my hopeless patching few cars stopped to see if I was fine. They all had tubeless though, so no patches onboard. There was also minibus full of white tourists – f#ckers waved but didn’t even slow down to check if I really like sitting in 35 degree heat while fixing obviously broken bike! I had my revenge later that day – I spotted them broken down and zoomed past them at 130 km/h, leaving thick layer of dust all over them. Of course I smiled and waved, just like they did earlier.
Anyway, with one tube fixed we moved on. This time I tried to sit on John’s tail to make sure he makes it to the finish line. He was badly traumatised – two flats in one day killed his confidence and enthusiasm. It was slow going, which means a lot of vibrations on my bike – I need to take washboard at about 110 km/h to make it smooth, he was doing more like 50. There was a lot of frustration in my helmet, my swear jar grew rapidly.
25 km short of some village there was flat number three. John’s front of course. Pinched on a rock again. I took the tube and went to scout for patches.



Local bike shop:



Road block:



After about an hour I was back with a huge pack of super big Chinese patches good enough for Mongolian conditions. Manual was in Chinese too, but somehow I managed to fix something after all. By then John was almost scared to ride. We made it to the village, refuelled and rode 10 km past for a camp.
John quick hand:



John’s bike was getting more and more Chinese, which made us laugh for a bit. Apart from that there was not much to laugh about.
Petrol price for petroleum market enthusiasts:



I had enough of it – after taking the bloody wheel off some seven times that day I was ready to throw the towel. By now I was a master in taking the wheel off and tube out and also knew how to patch a tube successfully so there were some positives.
Our campsite next morning:





Stats:



Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/313672
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:29 AM   #62
racki OP
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Day 20



Well, do I need to tell, that John got a flat front? This time I saw it happened – we were riding side by side to avoid dust in my lungs and we hit a ditch across the road. We were doing the same speed, the only difference is that I compressed and released suspension before the hit and opened the throttle. I made it OK, John not so much. This time he got the wheel off and tube out, I patched it and John started pumping. During our previous exercises he pumped more psi every time, hoping to prevent pinched tube. This time he went bezerk – he asked some local biker, who stopped to check us out, for a pump. I have a wimpy bicycle one, locals always carry big-ass car type pumps from 70’s. Good guy gave his all – 27 psi measured. No more flats that day, and hopefully ever. Tyre will rather burst than pinch anything. Other problem appeared – riding in sand got really hard. John was caught out in sand once, went down hard and lost the remaining enthusiasm.





John is making a show (water filtration), assisted by local parliament:



Hurry up guys, they are building highway here, equipped with much less fun:






Somehow we made it to next city but he was in pieces. We had lunch during which he told me to go ahead at my own pace as it’s unfair that I’m being slowed down that much. Well, it was an option, but not a smart one in my opinion. First of all I knew before that he is not a competent off-road rider, second I knew it’s safer not to give him any tools as he can harm himself. As a result leaving him behind would be a bit cruel to say the least. Instead I proposed to go and get some internet, catch up with families, get some fresh breath and start from scratch.



It was a good idea – after small break John wasn’t really enthusiastic, but he tackled dirt like he should – not too fast but steady. The road out of town was very spectacular.







Last 500 km or so were a bit dreadful – hot, dusty, potholes and washboard, the worst combo ever. This section was the opposite – it was a rewarding feeling to get over the next crest and see something truly beautiful.









John was back as a rider and we proofed we are not just a fair weather friends after all.





Camp by the river high in the mountains topped it nicely.





Stats:



Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/319838
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:46 AM   #63
racki OP
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Day 21 – Lawn in the mountains – Aktash, Russia



Every border crossing seems to be the same for us – it wet, cold and dreadful. This time it was no different. On top of that we had two flats, on the same famous wheel as always. One day there will be flat on some other wheel and that could be the biggest surprise of this whole trip.


Mongolia has started for us quite the opposite to finish. The exit, last 100 km is simply ugly. Run-down villages, horrible road (there is no multiple choice – just one road, raised enough to make it impossible to leave it, with washboard from hell). We fell in love with Mongolia the moment we crossed the border on eastern side. While being already in love, we could forgive the last bit. I can’t blame guys entering from the West for hard feelings towards this country. My advice is simple – start East, head West, avoid cities, learn some phrases and enjoy.







We were worried about patched tube, this guy had tyre to worry about:







While trying to find some tyre fitter in the last village, we got sort of lost. It was obvious where the road was, but tricky to get there. They have some sort of military posting, village is divided by a lot of fences and suddenly we ended up being on the wrong side of it. Group of soldiers was running along the fence, so I rode to them to ask for directions. They had machine guns and serious faces, so seeing some idiot on a bike asking if Russia is in that direction must have been a bit unusual to them. It looked like location of Russia was some sort of top secret stuff, as I was give two different answers. Backtracking was the safest option then.


We found Russia after all, but just before the border some local official looking boom-gate operator took 4000 local currency to let us out. What was that for, I’ve got no idea but it’s hard to negotiate with closed gate in front of us.
Passport control, customs and quick run to the Russians. In pouring rain of course, how else?


Russians took lessons from Mongols – our tyres were sprayed with some magic liquid, supposedly stopping world-wide infections of some sort, for which we had to pay of course.

Their procedures are hard to understand at least – there are no less than five different queues to fix basically three issues – passport control, customs and temporary vehicle import. At the end they forgot to stamp something and we were returned to the border. One AK47-carrying military guy wanted to be funny, so he told us that he wanted to shoot us for illegal border crossing. ‘I was told to go, I asked two times at least if that’s all’ was my answer. ‘By who’ he asked.’ Well, by this high rank guy with a missing stamp, standing right next to you’. His smile suddenly disappeared, mine appeared, we exchanged few jokes with stamp carrier and everything was back to normal.


We thought that is really all, but some 30 km later was another checkpoint. Why checking if guy coming from the border has got a passport? How else could I get there? It would require killing at least 20 people and I really doubt that two more guys would stop invasion.


Steppe finished suddenly, Altay Mountains took over. It was raining, cold and not nice at all. We had some food from long missed ‘kafe’, but weather was still the same. Having no other choice we went West. There was some hotel in a village few k’s later, but with one free bed only, so I ended up is some sort of service room, with coal stove, hot water boiler and real life sized Bambi photo on a wall.






Hotel in the morning:





Stats:




Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/319839

Bart
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Old 07-22-2011, 06:47 PM   #64
horseman474
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Epic.

Epic adventure.. Love it.

Are you guys running the same rubber and pressures ?
If so it says a bit for your experience verse your riding partners in the tally count of flat tyres...

The weight of the 800cc bike against your single could also be a factor. Would like to hear your opinion on the matter.
Saying that my hat goes off to your riding partner for taking on this adventure with you with his limited off road experience..
Big ones for sure !

This report is starting to make me question my plans for my trip.... Was fully prepared to ride solo and planning is advanced to do so but having that offsider for even little hick ups like a dead battery can be a real game changer in those parts of the world....

Might have to start looking for a ride partner for my journey......

Horseman.
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Old 07-22-2011, 08:04 PM   #65
Muddler
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This is great stuff Bart, keep it coming. Love the country.
Agree its wise to travel with company. Despite the frustrations, you'll be much safer and enjoy the trip more.
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Old 07-22-2011, 08:07 PM   #66
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......and when your trp is done, what will you remember? It wont be the days when nothing went wrong, itll be that day when you had to fix 7 bloody flats!!
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Old 07-22-2011, 09:13 PM   #67
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Amazing!

Thanks for taking the time to write this up! Sorry about the flats, but it will be the days you remember the most.
What an awesome adventure.

Ride Safe.
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Old 07-22-2011, 09:29 PM   #68
racki OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddler View Post
......and when your trp is done, what will you remember? It wont be the days when nothing went wrong, itll be that day when you had to fix 7 bloody flats!!

No regrets on doing this trip with Jonathon at all - it's great to have company. We are going slower, but it's not a race after all. Everytime I travel alone I do a gun barrel run and remember nothing at the end.

Regarding flats - there are a lot of factors - tyre has got ribs on the inside that help pinching, pressure is not a factor. Bike weight, suspension travel and quality, weight distribution at the time of impact... We can find few more. The result is more than 20 flats so far and lack of tubes. But that's the next installment so I'll shut up now.
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Old 07-22-2011, 09:53 PM   #69
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Day 22 - Aktash - grass near the river






Altai is a nice place. The road leads along the river, is smooth and properly signed. What surprised me was the number of tents set up everywhere. It seems that Russians are a camping enthusiast. Who would have thought?










Touristy excitement got us after all – we went to check museum of local culture. Interesting, topped with small tasting of local cuisine. It was the first time in my life I drank milk vine and the last one too.





Loo...





...with a view!





When crossing into Russia we were told, that two greatest nations on this planet signed some agreement, which allows members of other minor nations to cross freely between Russia and Kazakhstan. It meant that local border crossing, available just for locals should be good for us too. According to the map, we should be able to get there on dirt roads. There was one, but soon enough it turned into goat track. It was time to track back, but scenery was spectacular, so we had no regrets about that.












Road turned into goat track:




Local people told us it’s good time to turn around





That was the end for us:





For our second attempt we chose tarmac road, but the day was too short and we had to camp near the river. Someone was already there (all good spots seem to be taken in this country!), so I exercised my best Russian to ask for permission to stay nearby. Two young couples agreed, with a bit of curiosity about our origin.

We were excited enough to cook some sausages bought earlier that day. Let me give you some advice – do not, ever, buy prepacked sausages in Russia. Normal way of making such a sausage is simple – you have to grind dog with the kennel, but in this case they forgot to put the dog into the mix. It was pure crap to say the least. Pretty much the only bad thing we ate in Russia, the rest is delicious.

During this culinary experiment one of the Russian girls came over and invited us to join their camp fire. They let us stare at the fire, gave good food, a bit of vodka and a lot of black tea. Russians are really good to us – every one of them met so far was friendly, helpful and curious about our travel. It’s important to speak their language though – Jonathon noticed, that every time we speak English, Russians become a bit stiff and official. It’s enough to speak Russian, crack a joke, tell more about us and suddenly they become our best friends. I’m glad that eight years of Russian lessons finally have chance to pay itself off.

Our spot:





One of our hosts:





Of course there are traditional vodka guys everywhere. They are always very impressed, greeting procedures are prolonged and in particular they would love to try out our bikes. It’s enough to say two words – ‘nee hooya’. It needs to be said with Borat accent and it’s crucial to laugh out loud straight after. Otherwise you may end up without front tooth within next second. When said properly, it makes them laugh too, their friends are literally rolling on the ground laughing and we are free to go.


Stats:




Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/323482
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Old 07-22-2011, 09:58 PM   #70
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Day 23 - Russia - well... still Russia...


That day we finally reached this small border crossing. Well – we almost did. They stopped us at the first checkpoint and we were turned around. It’s not like we were surprised by that – a lot of people told us about that, but somehow we wanted to try it ourselves and the roads were nice too.
First checkpoint before the border:




Indians? There are a lot of common traditions between American Indians and local people:





On the way back I asked local Police how to get to the next border crossing using back roads. They went through much pain to explain it without showing us their map. I reckon they must have all the moonshine distilleries marked and releasing such crucial information to us would be simply irresponsible. For good measure Jonathon dropped his bike on their shiny Volga and we left.

Quick stop for some tube love:





We were making a steady progress – dirt roads were in good shape, villages were run-down, scenery was great. I’ve got no clue what could be the main industry here – there is not enough flat land for farming, forest is mostly gone. All we could see were free range horses, goats and pigs. Mostly on the road, of course.









Mountains have stopped and turned into this:





Local ‘kafe’ with beer choice. Note the properly sized bottles for real beer enthusiasts:





School bus:





It was clear that the border is too far for this day. It wasn’t raining too – it always rains when we cross the borders. I fixed the lack of moisture with my riding skills. Dirt road had a big, swampy puddle. Tractor tyres made it quite nasty, but it looked like it can be crossed on a narrow path along one side of it. We were tired by then, finding good camping spot was the only thing in our minds so I wanted to show Jonathon how it should be done – quick and efficient. ‘I’ll show you’ were my famous last words. Back wheel slipped, front jumped out of the rut and there was pure mud for support. My leg went down deep, bike landed upside-down in this shit. Before I switched it off it was too late- it sucked some water. It took a while to pull it out and at the end of it I looked like some sort of swamp monster – all covered in this stinky shit. John found the way around and after 20 minutes joined me on the other side. I saved a lot of time with my decision, didn’t I?

I was in a seriously bad mood that night.


Stats:





Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/323483
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:04 PM   #71
racki OP
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Day 24 - Russia - Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)


I tried to assess the damage previous night and it looked serious. The whole top end of the bike was drowned in a swamp, the rest got dirty during rescue procedures. Air filter was in mud with water in airbox. I know it can be started in 20 minutes, but I had no spark plug key.

Crime scene didn’t look dangerous at all:





The victim:





The mission for the day was to find a key somewhere in the villages. Everyone is a bush mechanic here, so it might be tricky to find one with proper size key but for sure someone has it.

After a bit of towing (with me at the back this time) we rocked up at the gate of some local ‘car problems fixer’. It was the first time he saw such a bike in real life, previously he had seen something similar during Paris-Dakar coverage. Spark plug key was not in his inventory, but ring spanner did the job. He had no clue how to fix that of course and was totally surprised when engine started working after some 30 minutes. I used the opportunity to wash, dry and oil air filter too.

Te engine was running a bit rough, but that was not a surprise. I knew there will price for me to pay for my stupidity sooner or later. It’s a bike, not a jet-ski after all - it wasn’t designed to be underwater.





Fire brigade:





Gravel road took us to the border crossing. There was 100 metre long queue which translated into two hours of waiting. Since we crossed the first gate it was relatively smooth process. John lost his rego papers, I lost one of the papers they gave me, but somehow I talked us out of the problems and we were greeted in Kazakhstan.





First photo of local kids – we had the opportunity during tube change:





Ust-Kamieniogorsk was our target for today – first big city. Reached after another tube change (no idea which one – eight maybe), it was a massive city. Much bigger than we expected and quite good looking too. Using our traditional method of finding hotel (right in the city centre, if it’s too expensive start looking away from the centre), we found a really nice one. Accidentally it was exactly the same one my Father stays in every time he does something for the local factory. It was awesome – internet, restaurant and laundry service! At around 48$ per head it was a good deal.





The bike had no blinkers, horn or high beam. Engine was running rough and gear changes were sketchy. It was also dirty as a pig. I was a bad, bad Bart again...


Stats:




Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/323484

Bart
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:09 PM   #72
racki OP
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Day 25 - Ust-Kamenogorsk - steppe


Laundry didn’t work out – we had too much stuff, they wouldn’t finish before evening, so we had no choice but to stink a bit longer.

There was some water in my engine oil, it was running rough and gears were sketchy. Plan was to nurse it to Almaty, but it would be stupid thing to do considering its condition. So we stopped at the first oil changing workshop, they had no bike oil of course (since there are no bikes in this city), but gave us details of local oil dealer, who should have something. They had mineral Yamalube – good enough. It was a straight change in John’s bike, but mine required three flushes before it came out clean. I always thought, that guys who say ‘my bike runs better after oil change’ are a total wankers and I want to use the opportunity to apologise now.





Gears were still the same though – it was just a bent gear lever. Can of WD40 fixed my blocked blinkers – there was just high beam missing.
We tried to get some kilometres, but it wasn’t easy – flat front again. Pinched again. I’ve got no idea how it keeps happening. Pressure is already way too high. Maybe something wrong with Heidenau tyre? There are some ribs on the inside – maybe thet’s what creates excessive rubbing?

Cemetery, build way better than local houses:





Local tyre fitter, named Vulkan, fixed all the patches for us, using traditional method of hot iron, bit of rubber and newspaper.







It looked horrible, but strong at the same time. Of course soon after that we got another flat, but we were too tired to fight for our consumer rights. After yet another change we got to some fully booked motel and eventually ended up sleeping in the steppe. It was nice, but plants were spiky and rough.





Stats:




Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/323485
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:19 PM   #73
racki OP
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Day 26 - steppe - Terekty


There were 900 km separating us from Almaty – a lot, but doable. Of course we like to have it rough, so John got a flat for no other reason than to spice things up. This time it was beyond repair – it exploded on a seam. The other one was damaged too. Vulkan, while in his patching fever, totally burned our tubes. Patch looked sexy, but the rest was simply scorched.



Egypt?



Pimped Volga:



I think we should try to stay inside during rainfall. It rains led in this area:



We were in deep shit this time. No other tubes than the rear ones were at our disposal. I had two – heavy duty and super-heavy duty. The second one became our weapon of choice. All I can say is that it’s bloody hard to stretch 18” tube on a 21” rim. If it blows, we might need to get some pliers to pull it out.
But that’s not all yet – for some time now John’s bike stops working from time to time. Mostly for a second or two, or just constant on-off-on-off. It happened once in Mongolia, but we ignored it thinking it might be side stand switch. This time it was a plague – it was impossible to ride. I suspect some electrical connector corroded after the bath or earth cable is loose. Hard to trace in the middle of nowhere. Just in case I disconnected battery hoping that ECU will rest itself and forget about error codes or something. I’ve got no idea how it works in details so it’s kind of voodoo dance for me.
It helped for some 60 km, which means there was something I moved that made the difference. This time earth cable was cleaned and all visible connectors disconnected/reconnected. It worked until the rest of the day.
While we were doing voodoo moves on the side of the road, we were passed by some Italians on KTM 950Adv and two Swiss guys on gs1200. None of them has stopped to check if we are OK. And it’s not like we stopped just for a piss – plastics were off, tools everywhere, jackets and helmets on the ground. They ignored us completely. What a dickheads. People in cars had stopped to make sure we are OK, fellow motorcyclists had far more important issues to attend to. I start to think that the whole ‘international fellowship of motorcycle travellers’ is just a bunch of few good guys in a sea of scumbags, dressed as a motorcyclist. They had no ADV stickers, of course, but neither do I.
While we were discussing this fact, three other 1200 arrived from the opposite direction. They nearly killed themselves in a process, that’s how hard they tried to stop. Russians – two couples and soloist. Such a nice people, I just couldn’t believe. Of course there was very little they could do to help us, but they gave us hope – apparently BWM service in Almaty has got computer to diagnose motorcycles. We were low on hope recently, so this was a great news. It was still a lot of k’s away, but at least we knew there is a good reason to try to get there.



All the Russians we met on our trip were the same – kind, generous and good people in general. I know I said it before, but I just wanted to write it once more.



Stop for a shashlyk:



Storm was brewing so camping was not a thing we would look forward to. Guys at the petrol station advised us on a hotel nearby, 5 minutes later we were at the gate. And what was parked behind it? Yep. 950 and two 1200. Conversation in a hallway was not a long one:
- Oh, you are the Americans we met in Oasis? (in Ulaanbaatar)
- No, we are the Aussies with the bike broken down on a side of the road that you ignored, dickhead
- Oh, I’m so sorry, I didn’t know.
- Of course you didn’t. Good night.
I hate when someone is doing bad stuff and then apologises when caught. I don’t want anyone to apologise to me for being a dickhead. It’s his permanent condition and no amount of apologies will change that.
Few beers, couple of stupid jokes about Swiss and Italian and we were back in good mood. Hotel was really good and not expensive, although I don’t remember the price.

Stats:



Map - http://ridewithgps.com/trips/323486
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:24 PM   #74
racki OP
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There is one more episeode missing, but I've got no time to do that now - bikes are fine, they have no diagnostics in Almaty but are super-helpful, we got Tajik visas.

No idea when I might get Internet now, so be patient, watch Spot i keep your fingers crossed.

Thanks for kind words,

Cheers

Bart
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Old 07-22-2011, 10:32 PM   #75
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note to self, learn russian. great stuff beautiful women in the middle of no where got to love it. keep on rollin'
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