ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-25-2011, 09:10 PM   #46
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
We arrived in Guanajuato, and the city was very cool, set in a picturesque valley, with an amazing road around the top, and tunnels beneath.

We stopped at a market for breakfast and had some great shrimp and seafood cocktails and some bread stuffed with… something. Was tasty but, and all for $4 per person.
I also noticed my pannier rack had cracked again at the weld that was done yesterday… On we soldiered to Santiago de Queretaro, another beautiful Colonial city. We saw lots of bikes as we headed towards the city, big bikes, not the 100-200cc ones, this was obviously gringo country. We arrived and the city was “beautiful”, all the buildings painted perfectly and kept exceptionally well. Range Rovers and BMW SUV’s abounded, not my kinda place. I like heritage, but I much prefer soul. We didn’t stop… until leaving the city and I spotted Mark and Maggie’s bike parked outside a hotel… we stopped for a quick chat, swapped some more travel suggestions, they had intentions of staying the night in the city, we didn’t.


We headed a little further, and got off the highway, we wanted to see the highlands of eastern Mexico, and our book said something about a road with 700 curves in the area (although it didn’t say where!).
We found out it was the one that we were on.







Some spectacular scenery (and roads). We camped as it began to rain, a theme that would continue to follow us for the next few days.
I awoke early in the evening to the sound of Tim’s voice and red and blue flashing lights on my tent “cops”. We had camped in a pull off away from the road, and we were just visible to passers by, Tim suspected that they saw his headlight as he was reading. Unawares of the laws on camping in Mexico, I expected to be hauled out into the rain in my underpants, get accosted in Spanish, and get summarily told to “GTFO”. Nope, they had a quick look and turned their car around, I happily went back to sleep.
We rode into town, enjoying the last bit of the road in the morning light and I noticed an exhaust shop, I stopped and explained the dilemma with my panniers to the kid who looked no older than 19, he knew his way around a welder though… I articulated through arm waving, breaking noises and poor Spanish some further modifications I wanted done to reduce the stress on them, thinking that by the time we leave Central America, I might have a bike that can actually hold up over a rough road! I am pleased to report that no chairs were harmed in the modifications of the panniers, and that I am happy with the finished job. Fingers crossed.
A really pleasant guy who spoke perfect English saw the bikes with California plates, he lived in Texas for a number of years, and had returned to Mexico in search of work, while his family stayed behind in Texas, we gave him a sticker and had a good chat; he gave us a recommendation of a place for breakfast. Times like this I particularly like travelling by Motorcycle, in places like this you stick out like a sore thumb, everyone wants to chat to you, and everyone thinks you are crazy, which is good as it removes the possibility of a false first impression.

We had an amazing breakfast, and then got our bikes washed for $2.50 each, they were filthy. We had a good chat to the guys, they liked our style and we liked theirs.








We continued on down through the Mexican state of Hidalgo, or as I have formally requested it to be renamed to “Land of the bleeding topes” (Tope = speed bump). Like Salsa, Tortilla’s, Cowboy hats and mustache’s, Mexican’s have a fetish for these things, I am yet to understand why, but Hidalgo by far is the worst, they vary in shapes, sizes and in many other ways except frequency. They are there before a corner, after a corner, during a corner, to protect the children, protect the dogs, the cows, the adults, the trees, they put them in the sun, in the shade, behind buildings and in front of them. I lost count of how many times I hit one unexpectedly (and as a result, too fast), my panniers and top box were going to love me.
The scenery and people did kind of make up for it though.


It is obviously on the poorer end of the provinces, and it is not uncommon to come around a corner and be encountered by a little hole in the road



We found a decent camping spot and called it a day.



We had conveniently parked near a lake, in the morning we woke up to this:

And we had the best meal we had in Mexico, fish for breakfast:

Continuing on we saw picturesque waterfalls, towns and the like

Riding down through Puebla, we hit Oaxaca, and noticed a change. This was obviously the poorest province, potholes were now filled in with a crushable gravel, meaning roads looked more like this:

And trucks that would randomly share their load with the rest of the world




That’s alright, out route soon turned to the sky













And the sky met us with a present too








The road went away, and back to us.












It was obvious we were entering more tropical provinces, the maize fields were still evident, but now they had to share their surrounds with sugar cane, banana trees and other more tropical flora. We stopped in a cool town








Dinner was particularly epic.




We stayed in a hotel (rare), mostly because it wasn’t just cats and dogs coming down, cows and horses decided to come down from the ceiling as well.
In the morning, the scenery and the road simply unfolded in front of us.









Usually I prefer my throttle locked in one position, wide open, for the first time in this trip (and possibly ever), I went slow. I was soaking it up.
A little 125 went past sporting more luggage than us, instead of getting the red mist and wondering how I could out brake him in the next corner, I thought about yelling at him “hey mate, you might have been born here, have you checked out the scenery here lately, how bought slow down and check it out!”




It was all happening, horses carrying Sugar Cane,


horses crushing Sugar Cane


horses not crushing giant spiders


Epic scenery


Empty pools


And traffic :(






With neat rigs









Lunch was impressive





Served by some wonderful senorita’s (note the sticker at the top ;) )




We stopped at Sumidero Canyon for a little boat ride, which is well recommended.













Stunningly beautiful scenery surrounded us
with a little bit of trash.




Back on the bikes, and it was a little wet.














New day. Palenque, we paid our $7, although I suggest asking for a discount, looks like they hadn’t finishing building whatever we were supposed to be looking at




Trying our best to get our monies worth, we looked past that










Seeing the age and condition of the buildings, Tim dryly added “should have gotten these Mayan dudes to build the roads, they would be a bit better off”.




We headed off to Cancun, found our worst campsite so far (in a maize field)


And settled in to enjoy the humidity for the evening.
Arriving in Cancun, we decided to head to Cuba. Tomorrow we are off.
Our hostel’s cleaning staff were that efficient that they thought throwing out our motorcycle boots might be a good idea (perhaps that says something about their smell?). I could do nothing but laugh. We attempted to find replacements for them, trying to find boots that fit my (not so large) feet that offer any form of safety protection in Mexico was like finding a swim suit for an elephant. We sort of succeeded and will not be riding in our sandals.


On edit: forgot to add that tomorrow I am off in search of a mechanic to help me with my top box, which broke the bolts that mount the rear rack (again). I also want to get the torques checked on the head bolts for Tim's bike, it seems to be weeping oil from the gasket at the bottom of the cylinder wall. We also need oil and filters, done 2100 miles since Zacatecas already, and 4600 miles for the trip so far!
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.

Flys Lo screwed with this post 09-25-2011 at 09:29 PM
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2011, 08:42 AM   #47
Throttlemeister
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Okie near Muskogee
Oddometer: 3,548
Great trip you two. Hope you have a nice time on the Special Island.

Thanks for the kind words, maybe seeing you around down in
South America, first round is on me
You have been having way too much fun rewelding those pannier racks; You will be pannier engineer experts by the time you get back to the states

Goodluck Guys

btw: How you guys planning to jump the GAP? (or have you not thought that far ahead yet)
__________________
www.throttlemeister.net
Throttlemeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 05:43 AM   #48
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Throttlemeister View Post
Great trip you two. Hope you have a nice time on the Special Island.
We definitely had fun, we missed our piles, but oh well!

Quote:
Thanks for the kind words, maybe seeing you around down in
South America, first round is on me

Quote:
btw: How you guys planning to jump the GAP? (or have you not thought that far ahead yet)
Planning?

hahaha



Don't know yet to be honest, Tim and I are both pretty good swimmers but
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 08:13 AM   #49
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
So, this part of the trip was sans bikes, so I am breaking the rules, but rules be damned!

Cuba

We boarded our Russian Thunderbus for Cuba, an A380 Airbus this wasn’t, cue the lights flickering, the crew running around, the cabin filling with smoke, and us smiling like a kid at Christmas.


Landing, overwhelmed by old cars, pollution, humidity, beautiful buildings, tourists, poverty and quite a wonderful setting for a city.


We decided to get our tourist on, and visit some of the sites


This fella’s mug was everywhere.













In the tourist areas, the city was beautiful.












Where the locals actually live, equally historic, but could do with a little more maintenance.




I like my cars big, American and old. I am not going to apologize for the flurry of photos of them.

























We toughed it out for a few days in Havana



We filled our time in by going to the revolution museum, where we got an interesting and incredibly one sided account of the revolution in Cuba. Walked around the city during an evening where the locals told us that each street had to have a celebration to celebrate communism. Interesting choice of words I thought.








We hung out with some local kids who’s past time was running across 3 lanes of traffic on the Mercado (Havana’s largest and most famous street), hopping the curb, jumping a 2ft wall and then in the next step leaping 10ft out to a small area of ocean where there wasn’t rocks that would end the day in a light case of quadriplegia.









Purchased crazy orange soft drink that I think was just refined sugar








Checked out the locals “ration book”




Smoked (good) cigars




Punished ourselves by going to some terrible beaches




Havana was a place with a lot of character, I enjoyed the city but probably wouldn’t rush back.




We headed down to Trinidad, instantly I liked it.




An old slavery town which made its fortune on the burgeoning sugar trade back in the late 1500’s


We found a casa particular (essentially a family that has a spare room that they rent out to tourists) called “El Chef”. Lobster was on the menu, it was incredible, and it was $10US. Nice place, amazing food, well recommended.



We saw a hill overlooking the town. Lets climb it!


Sweating like pigs in a butchers shop, we made it to the top and woke the security guard up from a slumber. Expecting to get asked to leave in a not so polite manner… nope. He invited us to come round the back, climb this rickety homemade ladder to the top and explained the history of the place, pointing out which houses were built, where the slaves landed and all the farms that have grown sugar for over 400yrs. Cool stuff.

We checked out the beaches, and were reminded of the dichotomy of Cuba, there is 2 currencies, “CUC” and “National”, the former for tourists and the latter for locals. It isn’t the only point of separation between those who are citizens and those that are visitors.
Tourists


Locals


Other points included transport
Tourists



Locals:




ATGATT!!!!

We enjoyed ourselves much more with the locals.




Returning to Havana having thoroughly enjoyed Trinidad, our capstone was probably the most fun. A taxi ride to the airport.
In a 1948 Chrysler.






(note the sticker)

Which then broke down. Even better!
So I put my supervision skills to the test.




Smoke and flickering lights awaited us on our airplane. Cuba was enjoyable, didn’t have enough time to explore. The people are very nice, although most (at least in Havana) want something from the tourists, that something is usually money, it is much much poorer than I expected.
Now the last couple of days in Mexico as we head to Belize.
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2011, 06:19 PM   #50
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
Cancun to Tikal

Back in Cancun, we were happy to be back in a land with great food and we found our motorbikes in the same condition we left them, Tim’s fine, mine still broken. Sought out a local shop and got that sorted we headed through the hotel zone of Cancun, I can describe it like a worse version of Vegas, with a beach. Not a fan – but from the number of tourists there my opinion must be in the minority. We continued further south, doing our best to avoid the boring highway filled with tourist buses.




We found some nice Cenotes (pronounced see-note-es) – caves with water in them.





















And saw some wildlife as we did it.




Staying in Tulum, we went off to check out some more old stuff. I didn’t think the ruins were that impressive, but their location was.








Heading south, we enjoyed our final Mexican roadside BBQ chicken feast.









We crossed the border into Belize, it was easy, simple and free*!
*well, apart from the mandatory fumigation and insurance… which with some sweet talking to the border guards, we didn’t purchase

The landscape changed, contrary to Mexico, Belize has taken a more conventional approach to its tropical wilderness – which is bulldoze it for farmland.

We got to Belize City, and toured the city, having a laugh with the locals – it was enjoyable to have long conversations with them (Belizeans’ speak English) – we were told many times not to walk and night, and were offered various substances even more frequently. We still quite liked the city though, Caribbean vibe, with a mix of African-American gangster.






The island of Caye Caulker was our destination, and we found it hard not to like a place which has been hit by a hurricane, splitting the island in two – so they build a bar so you can sit in the spot where the island was.




We went on a snorkeling tour, where we swam with all forms of impressive wildlife
Manatee’s (like a Dugong for the Australian’s)








Sting Rays











Eel’s




Fishies



Blonde’s




Sharks








Turtle’s




And beautiful Coral








Back in Belize city, we found some “alternative” routes with all the important stuff

Mud



Waterfalls




Amish



On the way out of Belize city we were stopped at a routine police check point, one more junior police officer was happy to send us on our way, his more senior compatriot saw doller signs at the end of it. The game of chess began. He asked for our licenses, we handed over one our few International Driving Permits, he asked for local insurance – which we didn’t have. I began my BS escapade using one of my preferred tricks – lots of stories, handing him lots of paper, trying to chew through as much of his day till he got exhausted. He didn’t, he was experienced at this. We got to the point where he dragged me aside and said he can do me a favor and cut me a break, but what am I going to do to return the favor. Out of bills any smaller than US$20, one left my hand to his and our transaction was complete and we were on our way.



We crossed through the border to Guatemala, things got a little more serious – border officials with pistol grip pump action shotguns. We followed all seasoned travel advice and road through central America at night time, in the rain, off-road. We got near Tikal and called it quits.

We hit Tikal in the search of old stuff.
Old Temples




Old Buildings








Old Inscriptions




And signs that don’t really need a translation.



Heading further south tomorrow.
I have a question for y’all actually – looking at our map, we hoped to do Coban to through Santa Cruz del Quiche to Lake Atitlan, but all advice from the locals is that we might come down with a bad case of being beheaded. Whats everyone elses thoughts on that here?
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.

Flys Lo screwed with this post 10-15-2011 at 09:26 AM
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 09:07 AM   #51
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
Guatemala

Heading south from Tikal, we encountered the typical Guatemala.
Floods where towns once were:








Good food




Amazing scenery (with floods)




Cool roads














Cool people









Weddings




Coupled with a few little indiscretions





On arriving to a town called Lanquin, we hit up a local soccer match between Lanquin and the next village across.




It was quite the affair, jumping up and down, yelling and throwing rocks at the players was actively encouraged. The raucous behavior of the crowd was only equaled by ambivalence of the large number of armed police in attendance.


We were glad the local team won.



Getting our exploration on, local bat caves were checked out.








Furthering our motivation for exploration, off we went to Semuc Champey (loosely translated to “where the river flows under the water”)
Local style transport
















More checking out the area




And toughing it out




It rained a lot, and the next day we took a day trip across to Rio Dulce, roads varying from a little hectic


And then it started to get epic.
















This was like a powder day at the snow, except the landings were a little harder.



We stopped at an amazing little Canyon




Where a cool kid paddled us in a canoe upstream – he was an amazing little guide, but it felt a bit bittersweet, he was 12 and for most people his age, it was a school day.





The views were incredible though.




Further up was a waterfall with hot spring water (cascada calliente) which we sometimes jumped off




And other times we fell off it



We are now in Antigua, time has been spent mostly checking the place out, catching up with some fellow motorcyclers and doing motorcycle maintenance, I broke my mirror, my left footpeg snapped off, bent my crash guards, and Tim broke off his number plate – and is not to be found again (we are sourcing a “local” solution). We have been blocked from going to lake atitlan by rains blocking the roads – but have since found of an off-road trail there that we should be able to get through, most likely a day trip tomorrow.

El Salvador most likely Monday, famous for amazing surf beaches, nice coastline, and the highest murder rate per capita in the world.
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.

Flys Lo screwed with this post 10-15-2011 at 09:37 AM
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 10:57 AM   #52
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
Guadalajara, a tour
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2011, 10:41 AM   #53
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
A teaser of whats to come...
Attached Images
 
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2011, 01:10 PM   #54
fizzerfz1
Studly Adventurer
 
fizzerfz1's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Woosta county, MA
Oddometer: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flys Lo View Post
A teaser of whats to come...
Bring it on!!!
__________________
DR650 - FZ1 - 200 EXC (plated - Not inspected yet)
fizzerfz1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2011, 07:16 PM   #55
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
Wet, wet, wet!

Since last report, there were some slight changes of plan. We decided to join the rest of the motorcyclists we caught up with to watch the Kiwi’s beat Australia in the semi-finals of the world cup rugby on Sunday, and do a day excursion to Lake Atitlan on Monday. After sourcing solutions for some of our various problems




(the remnants of the license plate)

We then helped André, a Swiss guy we met fix his low beams (they hadn’t worked since Minnesota!) on his bike. Discovering hidden talents for reading wiring diagrams written in German, we were able to get something working.




(photo courtesy of André)

We caught up with the crew again (here is an earlier photo)

From front left clockwise, Jess, lady I don’t remember, Kerman, Phil, Kevin, me, Tim, Wade, André and Jesse. Missing from the photo (but present!) was Glenn, Mark and Maggie. All riding bikes to Tierra del Fuego. You can follow their progress here
Glenn: http://sabbaticalglenn.blogspot.com/
Kevin: http://exploreplanetearth.net/
Phil and Wade: http://bergaliaboys.com

(photo courtesy of Kerman)

We also took the time to take in some of the culinary delights on offer for us in Antigua








We had enough of sitting around doing nothing in the rain for the last few days, and thought we would take the back way to Lake Atitilan, which consisted of a little of this:



At which point Tim’s bike developed a bad case of hydrophobia and blew the main fuse. Replacements also burnt out – and the short was not easily identifiable. We also discovered that the rear rack bolts had snapped on his bike as well (same problem as was happening to my bike – do other KLR owners have the same problem, or are we just “lucky”?).



We pushed Tim’s bike back through the river, then we rigged up a tow rope to mine to tow the bike the 10 odd miles up the windy road and back to the nearest town. We managed to find the gentleman with the most amount of electrical knowledge in town and proceeded to do some disassembly.



They worked into the night







We had to stay the night in town and we came back the next morning to a working bike, they suggest it was the Instrument Cluster that got some water in it, I don’t know if that was the case or not – but it was running, that was all that mattered.
We returned to Antigua to collect Tim’s license plate and get his rear rack fixed – at which point I need to give Moto Café a shout out: http://www.degustantigua.com/en/moto...html?Itemid=90 they helped us a great deal.

The solution for Tim’s number plate wasn’t really complete – nor sufficient, but we thought we would finish it up, and got his rear rack fixed.


We headed toward the border, rain pelting at us:



My bike died

Fortunately the issue was simple, and so was the fix. Water was that heavy it got thrown up from my rear tire to my fuel tank vent on my de-smogged bike, blocking it from getting air, and just needed to be drained.


Roads and bridges were regularly washed out, necessitating (sometimes creative) detours.







The border to El Salvador



The destruction from the rain here has been immense, they have had over 4ft of rain in a short space of time.
Roads at best looked like this

Rivers like this


It was not fun to be riding it. You were continuously drenched to your skin, had really bad visibility through a helmet visor that would be covered in water (and often fog), and the roads were terrible. You would wake up in the morning to wet motorcycle gear to do it all again.


We finally made it to El Salvador. The paperwork was pretty straightforward (if time consuming at 3 odd hours), and the officials generally pleasant.


Some of the locals jokingly asked if we had brought our fishing rods – when inquiring as to why, they said to go fishing on the road.
We soon got the joke.


Officials here were still friendly, and sported cool poncho’s.


MS-13 sightings were slim, but good food locations weren’t.



I had heard the road down the coast of El Salvador compares to Hwy 1 on the West Coast of the US, or the Great Ocean Road in Australia, while weather perhaps diminished the experience (and the photo evidence) the comparisons seemed fair.
Not wanting to hang around in the rain, we pushed south to the border, and slept the night there.
I woke up a little enlivened. This border (Honduras to El Salvador) was supposed to be the most difficult border we would cross in the trip, I have heard stories of people being stuck here for exorbitant lengths of time and forced to part with large sums of money that they perhaps shouldn’t have. Dealing with this kind of stuff excites me.
So begins the formalities.



One of the downsides of travelling with motorbikes is that at each country you need to import them (and export them from the previous country), it makes the entry/exit process around three times more complicated, time consuming and costly than if you were just travelling by bus.
I am surprised to report that the usual tiresome process at this border was not what we encountered. After leaving El Salvador (10 mins) we had a gentleman approach us offering to assist us with the border formalities (aka a “mule”). We aren’t interested in the services of these individuals, as we consider this stuff “part of the experience”, not to mention a lot of them are shadier than the corrupt officials you have to deal with anyway. This one was different, despite our persistence with “no”, he continued offering assistance, was honest, friendly, spoke perfect English and said he was not going to charge us anything, we can tip him at the end if we appreciated his services. Oscar I believe was his name, and he comes well recommended. We were through in under an hour. We were that pleased with services he scored $20US.

Honduras was a country we had both elected to kind of “skip” mostly due to the fact that we felt other neighboring countries (Guatemala and Nicaragua) offered more of the natural beauty we were seeking. While our experience there was brief and we didn’t stray from the Pan-America highway, I cannot report that it was pleasant. Towns were poorly kept, roads weren’t even kept at all, we were stopped twice by police fishing for bribes, one of them we had to pay (he discovered Tim’s “replica” plate, and threatened a fine because it was in violation of the rule book – which we demanded to see). Reports from other travelers and teachers that work in Honduras that I spoke to do not paint a pretty picture either, and suggest that the country is turning into what Columbia used to be, a drug lord haven.
Into Nicaragua. More paperwork.



Not long into the country the traffic started to back up.

Of course we scooted by.

We soon discovered the cause.








The local police and army egged us on (like we needed it) saying we could make it across pushing them – I laughed, completely contradictory to what officials would say in any western country, I like Nicaragua.
We paid two locals $2 each to guide us and began the pushing.









It was about a mile across, and was hard work. We made it to where the water was shallower, and I followed all experience mechanics advice by testing to see if I had water in my engine by hitting the starter button. It ran!




We stayed in the next major town, and went to check out a rum factory (thanks for the tip Beachguy ), it was closed, but their rum is most excellent.


We found out that André (the Swiss guy) stacked his bike while riding out of Guatemala doing about 50mph at the time. Apparently apart from a sore shoulder and leg he is ok, but his bike looks like a write off...


We then road down to Leon, and today we decided to climb an active volcano



Sit on a bit of ply-board



And slide down it.





Speeds up to 87kph (about 55mph) have been recorded. Not by us unfortunately though.
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.

Flys Lo screwed with this post 10-22-2011 at 07:41 PM
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2011, 01:41 PM   #56
BeachGuy
Alabama & Costa Rica
 
BeachGuy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Sandy beaches of Alabama
Oddometer: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flys Lo View Post
Wet, wet, wet!

We stayed in the next major town, and went to check out a rum factory (thanks for the tip Beachguy ), it was closed, but their rum is most excellent.


We'll Guys I offered you a tour of the plant when you came through. Should have dropped me a PM. I figured you drank to much to remember.

I had a get off and face plant in Costa Rica last month and my wife said if she had to baby sit me while I recuperate it was going to be State side, so now back in Alabama.

So, sorry I won't be in Costa Rica when you come through; if I could have helped you two in any way. Ride safe. Pura Vida!
__________________
BeachGuy

2010 Ride Report: Orange Beach, AL to Jaco Beach, Costa Rica
2011 Ride Report: Costa Rica to Panama back to Costa Rica
One of the beautiful things about riding solo is the quality of the social experience.
BeachGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 09:01 PM   #57
Sundowner
Bort
 
Sundowner's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Central Oz
Oddometer: 3,422
Epic ride so far.
Not sure if I comprehended the riding boots loss thing - did the staff throw them away or steal them or put them outside and someone took them? What did they do to help afterwards?
Anyway, keep rolling along - you're definitely doing it right. Keep flying that Boxing Kanga! Amazing photo's and stories. Love the photo of you guys grinning while the plane fills with smoke.
__________________
Home - an amazing place.
"Surround yourself with the best people you can, and make them your friends" - Justin Hunt, Oz Safari Director.
"
Say 3 Hail KLRs and recite the old Honda "skid demon" warning 3 times." - CA Stu
Sundowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 06:31 AM   #58
Skitch
Riding the range
 
Skitch's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: BFE, NM
Oddometer: 1,493
OK, I'm hooked...
__________________
Skitch
'07 R1200RT, '06 VFR800A, '08 SV650SFA, '05 CRF250X
IBA #21269
-- Golf is for the dead.
Skitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 02:20 PM   #59
Flys Lo OP
cool hand fluke
 
Flys Lo's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: between my last drink and my next one
Oddometer: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeachGuy View Post
We'll Guys I offered you a tour of the plant when you came through. Should have dropped me a PM. I figured you drank to much to remember.

I had a get off and face plant in Costa Rica last month and my wife said if she had to baby sit me while I recuperate it was going to be State side, so now back in Alabama.

So, sorry I won't be in Costa Rica when you come through; if I could have helped you two in any way. Ride safe. Pura Vida!
Sorry to hear about your stack man, hope you get better.

Not too bummed about not doing the tour, as long as they let me still drink the stuff I am ok!!!
I did forget about your offer - yes, too much rum!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
Epic ride so far.
Not sure if I comprehended the riding boots loss thing - did the staff throw them away or steal them or put them outside and someone took them? What did they do to help afterwards?
haha, I thought it was hilarious.

We placed them in the bathroom (next to the trash container) so they didn't stink up the room.
I am sitting at the bar having a beer and Tim comes up "hey, what did you do with our boots?" - I responded "didn't touch them". Then he starts inquiring in Spanish to the cleaner that is working around he bar, his Spanish being better than mine, but I understood her response of "basura" (rubbish)... I could tell Tim was close to flipping his shit.

The place wasn't that helpful finding our boots, nor offering any other form of compensation, or even offering directions to where we could buy any form of boots, I don't mind that much they were friendly otherwise, and they let us store our bikes there free of charge for our week over to Cuba. Just one of them things I 'spose.
The 8hrs we tramped around various markets to find boots that fitted us (but still offer no protection) was a hoot though.
__________________
Adrian, Central & South America, 2011/2012
02 GS & 08 WR250
I know violence isn't the answer. I got it wrong on purpose.
Flys Lo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2011, 07:19 PM   #60
jantarek
Beastly Adventurer
 
jantarek's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Southington , connecticut
Oddometer: 1,039
Holy crap I got here to Leon in the afternoon and you guys left in the morning, darn it lol Ok try again :P
__________________
My Blog: www.jantarek.com RR is on
Save $5 on www.smugmug.com enter this code:
TINCpSleQpUSI
My SpotWala
jantarek is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014