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Old 08-18-2011, 07:22 AM   #16
mjydrafter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleRedToyota View Post
a guy i know who owns a tire shop told me not to do both. (or, if i want both, to buy those plugs that have a patch attached to them you insert from the inside).

he said if you use both a plug and a patch, you can get air trapped between the plug and the patch...when the tire gets hot, the air expands, and causes either the patch or the plug (or both) to leak.

is that really an issue? if so, is there anything special you do to prevent it?

thanks.
Not if the repair is done correctly.

The sealing of the cords via the plug is more for the tires carcass, which in the case of truck tires the carcasses are worth pretty good money.
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Old 08-18-2011, 07:50 AM   #17
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjydrafter View Post
Not if the repair is done correctly.

The sealing of the cords via the plug is more for the tires carcass, which in the case of truck tires the carcasses are worth pretty good money.
Right. The plug is pushed down towards the inside of the carcass creating a nice air seal:



And the plug is pushed up from the tread causing the plug to seal the interior of the carcass keeping water and debris from causing seperation of treads, and carcass layers.

Jim
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Old 08-19-2011, 09:11 PM   #18
davevv
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String plugs have always worked fine for me. I hope they continue to as I just had to patch another tire yesterday.

Took the Tiger 800 to McD's at lunch. Three mile round trip from my house. Walked by it about six hours later and the rear was flat. It not only had a sheetrock screw in it, but also a paneling nail about three inches away from the screw. The Pirelli Scorpion Trail with only 800 miles on it now has two plugs. I've never had to run a tire with two plugs before, so I guess we'll see how it works out.

So, what do you suppose the odds are of getting two punctures in only three miles? I'd think it has to be pretty extreme.
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:09 PM   #19
sporthog93
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They do make a combination plug patch that must be installed from the inside. I have used them with no problems.
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:30 PM   #20
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This tire plugging thing can be beat to death as with other issues. Jim's method is in my book as fail safe as if can get. It was what I was taught in the early 70's when radials were just starting to become common place. And radial tire patches had not come the scene yet. So we were told and taught to plug them. Lubing up the plug with the rubber cement is just added insurance in that the job is dome right and sure helps with the ease of the operation. At the end of Jim's demo, he shows cutting off the excess with a new razor blade. This is hugely important. Do not use a pair of dikes to cut the excess plug matl. on the outside of the tire.
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Old 08-20-2011, 05:51 PM   #21
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Why not use side cutters to cut the excess? That's all i have ever used on car tire plugs? Never had a problem. Maybe I got lucky???
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:16 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
Nice production, Jim.
And I agree with everything posted.
However, rider may want to consider some tweaks to this operation.
I didn't get a reall good look at Jim's sticky string insertion tool but I suspect that it is of the 'buttob hook' design. I have had the hook snap off inside the tire and think that the design is weak. Therefore, I recommend the 'tweezer' design. It is more robust and about as bullet proof as you can get. Also, Jim's tools have the screwdriver type handles. Some tire are unbelievable tough and that type of handle just doesn't cut it. My tools have a 'T' handle.They don't pack as nice as the others. I cut about an inch off each end to make them more compact. Works great for me.

The downside to the tweezer tool is that the sticky string may be inserted too far and come out of the tweezer uselessly on the inside of the tire. What happens is that the rubber cement acts like a lube. And when the string gets to the inside of the tire, it suddenly slides too good and too fast to keep the whole string from going inside. There are several ways to avoid this problem. My fav way is to clamp a small pair of vice-grips (usefull to get the nail out too) to the tweezer tool shaft causing the tool to stop before the string disappears into the tire. Pretty much idiot proof and it gives me a two-handed grip on the tool if I need it.

Some other pointers: Carry a big tube or two of glue. There is no such thing as too much glue. Pack it in a zip-lock bag so if it busts, you don't have a mess in your kit. Carry at least a dozen sticky strings. If you have a choice between red and black, the red are better and the black are fine. If you are going on an expedition, buy new glue for the trip, even more strings; and add them to the stuff already in your kit.

DO NOT trim the string flush with the tire. Trim it off about 1/8 inch long. The end will sort of mushroom over and help keep the end of the string from working into the tire while the glue sets up good.

Do not pull the puncturing object until you test that it is indeed leaking. Mark the rim at a non-active leak with a bit of duct tape so that you can find it again while you look for another puncturing object that is probably the active leak. Plug active leaks first, duh.

Do not pull the puncturing object, if any, unless you have the reamer in hand for immediate insertion into the hole. Some holes are so small that if you take your eye off it, you play hell trying to find it for the reamer.

Do not take the reamer out of the tire until you are ready at hand to insert the sticky string.

Sticky string can be doubled over or two or more strings added to the tweezer to plug larger holes. (Let's see 'em do that with that Stop&Go stuff.)

If you are in the boonies, plug a sidewall hole anyway to get to safety and then replace that tire asap. Pick a safe place to make tire repairs if possible. Right next to the side of the highway after a blind curve or hill, is not optimal especially after dark. Nor is it a good idea to do the work in the bottom of a wash or gully. Working with poisonous snakes, fire ants, and large carnivors in the vicinty isn't optimal either. If you ride with ear plugs/music, take that shit out so that you can hear stuff coming.

It helps if your tire repair kit has its own bag. Thus, when you need it you don't have to unpack the whole bike to gather everything that you need. My tire repair kit also has a couple of bandaids, small flash light, insect repellant, and a very small mister of soapy water to test the plug (saliva works about as well as soapy water for a test), and a bit of bar soap in case I need to make up a lot of soapy ditch water to find a leak.

That's all that comes to mind at the moment.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:36 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by ibafran View Post
... Nor is it a good idea to do the work in the bottom of a wash or gully. Working with poisonous snakes, fire ants, and large carnivors in the vicinty isn't optimal either. If you ride with ear plugs/music, take that shit out so that you can hear stuff coming.....
You guys are so anal, thinking you've crested the mount....

How should a BWM rider wipe his or her butt when needing to take a dump in the woods?

This is plugging a tire, using a system that's worked for upteen years.

Afterwards, you sould wash your hands with 'x' cleaner, and don't forget about your nails, unless your wore latex gloves. The best gloves for repairing a tire on a BMW bike are 'x'. I always carry 'x' pair of these and keep them in a special place.
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Old 08-21-2011, 06:32 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Lone Rider View Post
You guys are so anal, thinking you've crested the mount....

How should a BWM rider wipe his or her butt when needing to take a dump in the woods?

This is plugging a tire, using a system that's worked for upteen years.

Afterwards, you sould wash your hands with 'x' cleaner, and don't forget about your nails, unless your wore latex gloves. The best gloves for repairing a tire on a BMW bike are 'x'. I always carry 'x' pair of these and keep them in a special place.
At least the rest of us added something constructive, unlike your spew, eh?

..........shu
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Old 08-21-2011, 06:54 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by sporthog93 View Post
Why not use side cutters to cut the excess? That's all i have ever used on car tire plugs? Never had a problem. Maybe I got lucky???
I am by far no eggs pert on plugging tires. And this may well not be gospel. But I was told that the reasoning behind it was with dikes/side cutters. A person has the tendency to pull and tug while cutting the excess string off the plug. Thus disturbing the plug that may very well be almost set up and cured by the time you get ready to cut it. Versus the razor blade that will gentle slice off the excess while not disturbing the position of the plug while it is setting up and curing.

Now that is to say that if you have strong mitts of which I don't and or a very good sharp set of dikes in your tire tool kit. Then you may get by ok.
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