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Old 08-23-2005, 07:58 PM   #31
mattmbishop
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Joined: Aug 2005
Location: Christchurch, NZ
Oddometer: 47
I'm in the process of setting up three XR's at the moment for a trip across Aussie. Have decided to go for a mixture of saddlebags, alloy boxes and stuff strapped on, there's photos and stuff here: www.yonder.orcon.net.nz/XR650L. The sketch isn't quite what we're gonna do, but it's close enough. If anyone is interested I could supply plans of my topbox, rack system. They are in metric though, not sure if that'll work for you yanks.

The subframe definately needs reinforcing if you're going to carry anything over a sleeping bag and a doz of beer. I recommend a triangle gusset where the subframe meets the mainframe and a stiffening flat along the length of the horizontal pipes at the rear. Also, build your saddlebag supports to incorporate a brace up to the back of the topbox or rear rack.
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Old 08-24-2005, 07:33 AM   #32
HighwayChile
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Location: Bow, WA USA
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Matt, looks like a hellof a lot of fun.
looking at your saddelbag set up, the mock up shows a leather portion over the seat to tie them together, is this how it wil be? as that would not be comfortable to your ass.

re packing, you plan to bring a sleeping bag, some areas that is overkill, you might be able to get by w/ a sheet and ground pad. look into some pauncho liners I've used them in hot weather and they are fine and super small. you might use the sleeping bag in the cooler areas then mail it ahead/home/ sell it, lots of back packers there as you know.

re your lock box, if it works well, contract the design out afterward and sell 'em, personally I'd go for the smaller version your buddies using, then use a wire mesh w/ lock to secure the sleeping bag/tent if your concerned w/ theft. kayaking dry bags work well too for packing.

I read your trip report, about the engines stalling in the river, I would disagree about them stalling due to transistion from hot to cold. I've never heard or seen that, I would try to repeat it, could water be causing a short? maybe I'm wrong but I'd look into that a bit more, speak to some other XR owners. www.thumpertalk.com go t XR650 forum.

make sure to post some pics', or links ,
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Old 08-24-2005, 08:16 AM   #33
arroyoshark
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Location: Fin del Sendero, NM
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From experience, I don't like the feeliing of lots of luggage bungee strapped on back of bike and riding up high. Trying to explore rugged or muddy roads is a real handful with poor weight distribution. After considering a lot of options and having a penchant for a good tidy, but inexpensive luggage solution I recently ordered and mounted pannier racks from Moto-sportpanniers.com ($189), set of bottom mounting rails ($9.00/pair) and 4-mounting pucks ($9.00 ea) and easily mounted two hard shell poly. xtra large, pistol cases from Doskosport. These cases are weather tight and are available from online sporting outlets or from big box sporting goos stores at discounted prices. Doskosport also lists a slightly smaller pistol case case in this series. A detailed thread about mounting these cases is in the Equipment forum.

I can use these 34L cases on both a Honda Transalp and on my DRZ. Overall width on the DRZ is under 35-inches. The cases are roomy enough for most camping and traveling equipment, can be removed quickly, and most importantly, keep mass lower on bike with less weight shifting.

Here is pics of DRZ with the hard cases:


















When you consider the total system cost of hard, lockable luggage from several manufacturers at $700-$875, this is a pretty economical option. Moto-sport lists a pannier rack for the Honda XR650L.
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Old 08-24-2005, 08:33 AM   #34
rideLD
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Location: Omaha, Nebraska
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Here is my setup.
Summers Racing Components alluminum luggage rack
RKA tail bag
RKA soft saddle bags
Aerostich tank panniers


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We pay Motorrad to design weight off the bike then pay TouraTech to bolt it right back on.
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Old 08-31-2005, 05:11 PM   #35
rokklym
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Joined: Nov 2004
Location: Westby Wisconsin
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I'm not going to pretend I know alot about motorcycle travel, but here is what I learned in July when I did 1236 miles in 4 days on the Michigan UP off road Safari.
Keep the weight low! The XR's are top heavy enough, It might be fine on the road but when you get off road and all that weight is rocking around, its a handfull and once its start to go donw, its going down!.

Bungies suck... but they are also quite handy if used right.
The first day of our trip we learned alot about packing bikes. My buddy jetisoned a bunch of stuff from his DRZ and I was amazed how far his gear would jump off the back of his bike when he hit bumps and had everything bungied down.
I have the pro moto billet rack and I love it but I wish I wouldn't have had to remove the tool bag. One thing about those bungie nets, make sure you face the hooks outward so they don't touch anything. I found out the hard way and ended up with 6 holes in a brand new thermarest and holes in my drybag.

I'd say soft saddlebags are the way to go and the Ortlieb ones would be at the top of my list. Keep the weight low and strap ( not bungie ) your other light luggage on the rack or seat and use the bungie over it to hold stuff like shirt or rainsuit when you warm up during the day.

Also, I must give a recomendation to Dirtbikegear.coms number plate bag! awesome and handy..oh, and cheap too.
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Old 09-03-2005, 12:18 AM   #36
RLK
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Location: CSprings
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Somewhere between failure and triumph...

lies accomplishment.

This was purely an improvisation, to get me through a spur-of-the-moment weekend in the woods. It worked, but begs for some adjustment and re-thinking.

Ingredients:
Galvanized 1" wide band to replace the pillion hand hold.
assorted scrap wood
gutted Mermite can
2 short ratchet straps
Many bungees.




Solid aluminum box, strapped to the subframe/seat support and where the vinyl handhold was. This was a bad idea but I got lucky. The straps are pulling up on my homegrown metal band, held in place by 23 year old M8 studs. If one stud gives, everything scatters across the road.

From this platform my sleeping bag and hammock are bungeed on. The bag is 3.5 pounds and the hammock is 2.5 pounds. It looks like a lot of weight up high but its less than 4 pounds that sits above my ribcage.

Ready to roll some pavement:



Camp looks like this:
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Old 09-03-2005, 12:39 AM   #37
davorallyfan
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Location: Capitalist
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Hammocks probably wont work too well where this guy is going (no trees) and he will need a sleeping bag - the desert gets cold at night. Soft bags work best when you drop your bike - you will drop your bike.

have fun and good luck.
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Old 09-12-2005, 01:50 PM   #38
scootertrash
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Location: "My leg's tired, let's live here."
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Very nice setup. Looks like a lot of thought went into choosing what works! I have a couple of questions. I notice that your front fender is drilled out, is this to enhance cooling air to the engine? Do you run an oil coler as well. Is engine temps an isse with this bike? Finally, did you beef up the subframe and if so do you have close up's of the bracing (if not, does anyone else?)
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rc46
Here is my setup.
Summers Racing Components alluminum luggage rack
RKA tail bag
RKA soft saddle bags
Aerostich tank panniers


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Old 09-13-2005, 02:03 AM   #39
RLK
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Location: CSprings
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scootertrash
Very nice setup. Looks like a lot of thought went into choosing what works! I have a couple of questions. I notice that your front fender is drilled out, is this to enhance cooling air to the engine? Do you run an oil coler as well. Is engine temps an isse with this bike? Finally, did you beef up the subframe and if so do you have close up's of the bracing (if not, does anyone else?)
Thanks!
I know this question is not addressed to me but as a former XR650L rider here is my oppinion anyway.

The subframes weaken over time with wear. One splash of battery acid that isn't rinsed right away will start to blister the paint and rust the steel. Other factors like winter storage or use hurt or help the frame also. If its been ridde in winter, tis probably been exposed to all kinds of salts and solvents used to keep ice off of streets. That shit eats frames fast.

If the subframe on a newish bike dosen't show signs of rust, its probably ok and dosent need re-inforcement... yet.

The front of the frame is the oil tank; dry sump system. It provides enough surface area to cool the oil and motor in normal use. The holes in the fender allow more air to hit the combination frame/tank/oilcooler and the fins on the case, to aid cooling.

On this bike the dipstick is just below the speedometer. A popular replacement part is a dipstick with a thermometer inside. With that the rider can watch oil temp without stoping.

Its a beautiful thing when one part does what other bikes need 3 or 4 parts to do.
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Old 11-14-2007, 06:23 PM   #40
Lawnmower
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Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Aztec, NM
Oddometer: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by rokklym
I'm not going to pretend I know alot about motorcycle travel, but here is what I learned in July when I did 1236 miles in 4 days on the Michigan UP off road Safari.
Keep the weight low! The XR's are top heavy enough, It might be fine on the road but when you get off road and all that weight is rocking around, its a handfull and once its start to go donw, its going down!.

Bungies suck... but they are also quite handy if used right.
The first day of our trip we learned alot about packing bikes. My buddy jetisoned a bunch of stuff from his DRZ and I was amazed how far his gear would jump off the back of his bike when he hit bumps and had everything bungied down.
I have the pro moto billet rack and I love it but I wish I wouldn't have had to remove the tool bag. One thing about those bungie nets, make sure you face the hooks outward so they don't touch anything. I found out the hard way and ended up with 6 holes in a brand new thermarest and holes in my drybag.

I'd say soft saddlebags are the way to go and the Ortlieb ones would be at the top of my list. Keep the weight low and strap ( not bungie ) your other light luggage on the rack or seat and use the bungie over it to hold stuff like shirt or rainsuit when you warm up during the day.

Also, I must give a recomendation to Dirtbikegear.coms number plate bag! awesome and handy..oh, and cheap too.
Very Wise Norwegian advise.
I will keep the weight low, thanks

Dan Hjalmarson
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Old 04-08-2008, 10:42 AM   #41
BeeDub
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Well, I've got a new set-up, Tom at Turbo City outfitted me with this, and I like it. Hopefully, I'll be giving it a go this coming weekend. Sorry for the crappy camera phone pic, my good camera was dead when I got done, and I couldn't find my charger.

Name:  Adventure Front small.jpg
Views: 6585
Size:  105.5 KB

Parts on there (All bought at Turbo City):
  1. Sequoia rack
  2. Cortec Sport saddle and tail bags
  3. Kolpin 1.5 Gallon fuel container
  4. skid plate with engine guards
  5. rear brake master cylinder guard
  6. headlight guard
  7. windshield
Everything but items 2 and 3 are made by Turbo City, and all seem to be of excellent quality. ALL items can be purchased online at Turbo City. Tom at Turbo City is a really nice guy, and he told me he is aiming to make good quality stuff, and I think he does that.

Here is a link to the XRL stuff: http://www.turbocity.com/default.php?cPath=69_74

By the way, I'm stoked, that's my bike in the online catalogue!

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Old 04-08-2008, 12:19 PM   #42
kubiak
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Joined: Nov 2007
Location: madera california
Oddometer: 4,809
a pic of my 06 xr650l with saddlebags

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Old 04-08-2008, 12:20 PM   #43
kubiak
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Location: madera california
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heres a rear view

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Old 04-08-2008, 05:02 PM   #44
ravenranger
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Location: az
Oddometer: 1,514
+1 on the Turbocity racks.



That's what I have on my XRL. Here's a thread with more info and more pics:
LINK

+1 on hammock camping, too! I have an HH that I just love! Carry a few 'biners and climbing nuts and you can set up pretty much anywhere, even without trees.






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Old 04-08-2008, 07:53 PM   #45
OnOff
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Joined: Oct 2006
Oddometer: 1,616
Ortlieb and MSR...

I recently put an MSR tail box on mine which is sort of soft plastic/nylon/zipper and I like it over the original tail bag. Holds a lot more than the original bag and looks sharp
I also recently picked up a set of used (half price) Ortlieb waterproof saddlebags. Size seems decent, but I have yet to use them to be honest. Might have to think about a way to keep them off my tail pipe... The quality of the Ortliebs seems very good and I will report more as I use them. I think this setup will be very functional when I figure out the best way to anchor the Ortliebs. Need to do it before an upcoming trip.

I used the base to my old tailbag to anchor my tools in the MSR trunk and it keeps the tools secure. A Craftsman zip up bag keeps em dry and organized with room to spare in the trunk. Only negative I can see is you have to remove the rubber stabilizing piece that goes from the fender to the stoplight. You see a little more vibration of the light without that piece but not too bad.





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