ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-19-2011, 03:37 AM   #76
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Choluteca, HN (310 kms)

Well, at least it was warm…

*There was no way around it.* I had checked the night before when the sun would break the horizon and set the alarm accordingly.* I stood outside beside the bike with the night security guard and looked at the heavy rain falling wondering when it would stop.* I was going to get wet and there was no way around it so I handed in my room key and got on with the days riding.



Morning fuel stop in La Libertad, SV.

I was less then twenty minutes down the road, soaking wet and muttering profanity when a close call shook me from my morning funk. *My visor had fogged up and so had my head. *In short, I wasn't being as careful as conditions required.* Now the brakes were hammered tight and I was wide eyed and staring down a fast approaching mud slide through the hazy rain soaked visor.* The bike did its part and stopped me just short of the hazard that surely would have put a crimp in my plans.



Mudslide south of La Libertad, SV

Who needs morning coffee when a good shot of adrenaline is available? *So with my head back on task I made good time to the Honduran border ...considering conditions. *I had decided the night prior, after looking at long range weather reports that I would push through Central America and into Panama to avoid the wet weather.*When I arrived the usual collection of helpers where at my heals and I was directed to get copies of a document they had just issued. *I had only large USD bills and it was here that I was bailed out with a quarter by a couple from Calgary.



The copier place didn’t have change for the twenty and the border “helpers” were circling my wallet like vultures over roadkill. *Sandra and Jordan spotted me 25 cents to get me on my way.* We chatted a while as we cleared Honduran customs together. *They offered to ride together for the day to the small town of Choluteca, HD where we had dinner and shared a room at a hotel on the edge of town.



Bikes at Honduras Immigration.



Calgary's Sandra and Jordan.



Jordan and Sandra dealing with El Salvador Federales.



Honduran border in the distance.



Bikes parked at hotel in Choluteca, HN.

In the morning I will ride with Sandra and Jordan to the Nicaraguan
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2011, 02:46 PM   #77
Trondomatic
To infinity and beyond...
 
Trondomatic's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Near Merritt, BC Canada
Oddometer: 112
Subscribed!

I just came back from a two year journey through South America (by bike and truck) and am loving seeing it all over again in your ride report. Nicely done.

You'll be happy to know that the "helpers" are a Central American thing. Once you hit the Southern Continent, they are no longer around and the borders crossings become better signed and faster to clear.



Enjoy!
__________________
How not to travel to South America- My wife and I ride part way to S. America
Bear, Beer and Bare in the BC Bush - Solo ride into bear country.
Just finished a South America journey by bike and 4x4. Blog: Travellin' Troz
Trondomatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2011, 09:39 PM   #78
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Masaya, NI (317 kms)

I now know just enough Spanish to get myself into trouble. *Not dangerous trouble, just a bit of mischief. *The soup at the border lunch stand looked and smelled great. *Cast iron pot, lots of veggies and something else I couldn't make out. *I asked ...heard something about vegetables and immediately said yes. *Sandra and Jordan bailed me out again and let me in on the secret ingredient.

All the gear was dry in the now funky smelling hotel room. *One person's gear can really do a number on the place but three sets of wet gear had the room smelling like the south end of a north bound camel. *I went outside to enjoy some fresh air, do some exercise and check on the bike.



Bikes ready to go in Choluteca, HN.

The weather look promising. *Light cloud and a cool breeze had us packing up early in anticipation of a great start to the day. *As we each put our helmets on a light trickle started and was followed shortly thereafter by 90 minutes of torrential rain. *Not knowing when it would stop we chose to ride through to the Nicaraguan border dodging the usual potholes and mudslides.



Sandra negotiating a mudslide near Choluteca, HN.

The weather opened up about 20 minutes before the Nicaraguan border and we pulled into a long morning of paperwork in good spirits.



Starting the day at the first of several checkpoints to enter Nicaragua.

The borders are time consuming and the helpers make it a bit stressful but for the most part they are easily negotiated. *The government workers are helpful and to this point honest. *That being said, it was nice to have a couple extra sets of eyes to help out.



Sandra dealing with a helper in El Espino, NI.



Sandra and Jordan at Nicaraguan Customs.



Fumigating the bikes in Nicaragua.

When the two and a half hour process was done I was hungry and went to a lunch stand a trucker recommended just across the final checkpoint. *The family run stand had fried chicken being prepared at one end and at the other was a huge iron pot filled with wonderful smells and colors.



The lady was filling up a massive salad bowl full of the hot soup when Jordan and Sandra let me in on the secret ingredient. *The "meat" of the soup was tripe. *I waved her off too late and the bowl was full. *Fortunately there was a line up for this stuff and the guy behind me took it in a flash. *I broke my afternoon riding rule and had the fried chicken and rice instead. Jordan, Sandra and I also had some nice company as we ate. *"Finigan" sat with me and ate my scraps as we all enjoyed the nice cool mountain weather.



The Guatemalan street dog I named Finigan.

Jordan and Sandra are trying to make a boat in Panama and I want to get south of the rain so we are all pushing through Nicaragua quickly. * We pulled into the town of Masaya in the early evening and found a spot that would take the bikes in the front lobby.



It was more of an hourly place but nothing that a sleeping bag wouldn't cure. *It is supposed to rain hard again tomorrow so I will push on to Costa Rica and hope for better weather. *I may travel with Sandra and Jordan again as I'm told the exit from Nicaragua can be complicated and the help watching the bike would be nice.

 

BluNozr screwed with this post 10-22-2011 at 09:46 PM Reason: Wrong entry posted
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2011, 09:42 PM   #79
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Liberia, CR (193 kms)

There have been many unexpected challenges and surprises on my journey to date. Most have had positive outcomes and others, well not so much. Now weather has pushed me south quickly and presented me with more new experiences. The large number of border crossings for example, have presented obstacles on entry and exit alike.




I woke early in Masaya and snuck out of the room and let Jordan and Sandra sleep a while longer. I worked on emails and blog posts alone in the dark lobby with the sounds of the street growing by the minute. Sandra and Jordan woke up an hour or so later and we wedged the bikes out the narrow door down the ramp and on to the street to start our day. We were on the road 10 minutes when we realized how close we were to the beautiful city of Granada.



Passing by Granada, NI

I felt a bit let down that I missed that on the map the day before and regretted not pushing further then to this beautiful city. Regardless, I was about an hour from the border and off the bike in the warm sun for the first time in days. I also ran into Monica and John S. for the fourth time in four border crossings. They are from Florida and have been living in Guatemala for several years and are on there way to Panama for business. Several days earlier at the El Salvador border Monica, who speaks fluent Spanish, used some verbal judo to get me to the front of the line at Immigration. They are nice people who always make a point to come over to say hello.



Monica and John S.

The start of this border crossing went suspiciously quick...



...but what was to come on the other side was a exercise in patience that I was losing very quickly. On arrival I lost my temper with an overly persistent "helper" and shared with him some heated and colourful language that the border guards in Tecate, MX could probably hear. On the bright side, I was left alone by the remaining hustlers to deal with the unnecessarily complicated process of entry into Costa Rica.



...and an hour later.



There were a few nice diversions in and around the border to keep me occupied as I waded through the bureaucratic mess. Oddly enough an actual circus was moving through the border circus and I had the opportunity to check out some tigers.



I think the tiger is eyeing up a possible snack.

Several hours later I was back on the road as was the rain.



Riding in the rain in northern Costa Rica.

Sandra had some minor bike issues that were resolved quickly but it meant an early stop in the town of Liberia. We got a couple of rooms off the town's center square and Jordan and I went out for a cold beer before calling it a night.

BluNozr screwed with this post 10-22-2011 at 09:48 PM Reason: Wrong entry posted
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2011, 09:52 PM   #80
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trondomatic View Post
Subscribed!

I just came back from a two year journey through South America (by bike and truck) and am loving seeing it all over again in your ride report. Nicely done.

You'll be happy to know that the "helpers" are a Central American thing. Once you hit the Southern Continent, they are no longer around and the borders crossings become better signed and faster to clear.



Enjoy!
Glad you are enjoying it Trodomatic. Nice to hear on the helpers. Another inmate (Crashmaster) told me to make a quick run to SA. I doubted him for a bit but it seems to be the what everyone is saying. If you have any ideas on nice rides please let me know. I am always looking for a good idea.

Enjoy that nice Canadian weather. I'll be back in June ...if I come back.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2011, 07:15 PM   #81
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
San Isidro, CR (348 kms)

I had hoped for sunshine in Costa Rica, find a beach and settle in for a day or two. Unfortunately the forecast for the remainder of the week showed no less then 40mm of rain on each of the next five days. Today the rain soaked soil was washing away from beneath the roads. It hasn't washed away my resolve to continue, but it's getting damp.



I woke up early again and hung out till Jordan and Sandra rose. They seem more relaxed in the morning and push later in the day and I fear my early mornings are making them feel rushed. We all had breakfast together at a familiar, WiFi friendly stop with unfamiliar fare.



Breakfast in Liberia, CR

Bike issues hampered our progress the entire day. Sandra's F650 was giving her problems since a fuel stop on the Costa Rica border and it was getting progressively worse. The rain was still coming down and mudslides and washouts were the news of the day in gas stations and newspaper alike.



Mudslide being cleared north of San Jose, CR.

It had been a long day to Cartago, CR when we were stopped at a roadblock on CA2 at the base of the mountains south of the town. The road had washed away and closed. We were faced with a extra hour of travel and sunset was fast approaching. It was at this point when a Tourista Police officer named Leo offered to help us out and take us to the roadblock and show us the detour route.



Leo from Costa Rica's Tourista Police.

Leo did us one better. He told us to stay put, went up to the scene and came back to escort us through the road closure and save us the long detour.



Getting escorted past the road closure in Costa Rica.



We hung out for a while on the cool mountain pass and took a few photos in the thick fog until we were escorted through the site.



Waiting at the road closure.



Once on the south side of the closure traffic was light, the rain intense and the air cool. I made my way to the small town of San Isidro shortly before dark. It did not have many options for hotels and camping in the torrential rain is not on my list of places lay my head. I found a nice little spot on the edge of town, covered the bike and took shelter from the rain.

The rain has made navigating the road south difficult and the expense of hotels is starting to build. I will push farther south again in the morning to escape the deluge and cross into Panama in search of dry weather.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2011, 07:17 PM   #82
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
David, PA (272 kms)

Some people make this ride without a hitch. *Is it good timing, luck or preparation? *It's hard to say, maybe a bit of each. *The only thing about a trip that ends without a problem is the story doesn't have a low to contrast the climax. *Sandra and Jordan have had their share of lows and today the story got a bit more interesting for them.

It was more then likely going to be the last day of riding together. *Jordan and Sandra were headed to the east coast of Panama to catch a boat from Colon, PA to Cartenga, CO. *I on the other hand got confirmation the night before from the captain of the vessel I hoped to get on that it was full. *He also mentioned the heavy seas this time of the year and my ticket was written ...to fly over the Darien Gap.

Sandra's bike started the day well and went downhill quickly. *We stopped at a fuel station so Sandra could top up and while there I noticed the front page of La Nacion at recalled the same car from the day prior as we sat on the mountain top.



Front page of the paper.

I had pulled ahead to play on the empty roadway along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. and waited in a small town for an hour for them to arrive. *On my way back I spotted Jordan and he told me about Sandra's bike needing a repair and getting a truck to transport it to the border.



Sandra's bike catching a ride.

We made it to the border, offloaded the bike and Jordan diagnosed the issue. *The connector from the throttle body to the engine was cracked and causing the deterioration with performance of her bike. *Jordan did a quick fix that got us on our way to Panama Customs and Immigration.



Repaired throttle body from Sandra's F650.



Loving life in Panama.

The crossing at the Costa Rica / Panama border was smooth and easy. *I think my mood and attitude were the difference this time round. *We pulled away from the border late and headed to David, PA when Jordan motioned to a hostel on the highway. *I took that opportunity to wave goodbye and continue on to the city of David where I got a hotel in the pouring rain.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2011, 07:19 PM   #83
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Panama City, PA (548 kms)

I was given some good advice when I left Anchorage, AK by a rider from Southern California. *He told me when dealing with the police, take your helmet off, smile and be pleasant but don't take their crap. *I got flagged down today and was ready to use his advice but the officer threw me a curveball.



I left David, PA with new hopes that Panama would bring the fine weather I was looking for. *The day started well and it was a good hour later before the skies opened up along my route south to Panama City. *I dove into a hole in the wall gas station and had a couple of cups of coffee waiting out the rain.

It was one of those days of straight forward, nothing to see riding. *I was making good time when I spotted a radar gun in the distance pointed right at me. *I wasn't for several more kilometers that I was flagged down by his partner. *He spoke with me briefly, asked for my license and handed it right back with a direct warning to slow down. *He had no interest in writing me a ticket. *We chatted about bikes for a short while before I took his photo and left.



Traffic warning outside Panama City, PA

I made my way through Panama City quickly and over to the Girag Cargo office in Tocumen. *I confirmed the bike for transport over the weekend and when I stepped out of the office there was the sun. *I guess the rain cloud was following me to see me out of the country. * I looked around a while for a hotel under $200 and ended up on the edge of town in a place that I did not take a photo of because I would prefer to forget it.

I will do a bit of sightseeing in the morning before taking the bike to Girag Cargo for inspection and prep for the airlift.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2011, 07:23 PM   #84
yellowknife
Is In Canada
 
yellowknife's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 689
Yahoo

South America Next. Good Stuff, but dang you are moving fast. Keep good notes on the flight stuff for the bike.

YK
__________________
Yellowknife - New France New Scotland (Nova Scotia)
yellowknife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 03:46 PM   #85
SS in Vzla.
Totally Normal? I'm not!
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Banana Republic of Black Gold
Oddometer: 1,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by BluNozr View Post
I looked around a while for a hotel under $200 and ended up on the edge of town in a place that I did not take a photo of because I would prefer to forget it.
FWIW

Go to Avenida España y Via Venetto.... Lot's of hotels there from aprox $60 and up....waaaay up.
or
http://www.panamapassage.com/
I don't know them personally, but have seen them being mentioned by other overlanders.

Re: tires... You can find tires easy in Colombia. Ruta 40 in Medellin will probably carry TKCs for your bike, but if you are not set on knobbies, you'll find decently priced tires in every major city. (Anakees, Tourances or the likes)

If you are planning on including Venezuela in your trip, drop me a PM and I'll give you suggestions with routes and help you with whatever I can. Beers are on me.

Buen viaje!
__________________
SS. '98 BMW F650 / '06 WR250F / '07 KTM 990 Adv
Caracas, Venezuela
SS in Vzla. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 04:48 AM   #86
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Quote:
Originally Posted by SS in Vzla. View Post
FWIW

Go to Avenida España y Via Venetto.... Lot's of hotels there from aprox $60 and up....waaaay up.
or
http://www.panamapassage.com/
I don't know them personally, but have seen them being mentioned by other overlanders.

Re: tires... You can find tires easy in Colombia. Ruta 40 in Medellin will probably carry TKCs for your bike, but if you are not set on knobbies, you'll find decently priced tires in every major city. (Anakees, Tourances or the likes)

If you are planning on including Venezuela in your trip, drop me a PM and I'll give you suggestions with routes and help you with whatever I can. Beers are on me.

Buen viaje!
Great advice, thanks a ton. I'm gonna head to the north coast of Columbia to find some sun but on the way through I'll take a look at the rear and see how it's doing. The last K60 Scout I had back there went 18,000 kms when I took it off prematurely but I may opt for something early again.

I will be in Venezuela on the way back. I'll send a message along then. Thanks again for the help.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 04:50 AM   #87
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Bogota, CO (744 kms ...by plane)

The food court at Panama International Airport was like a service road on a North America highway. *Fast food and lotsa fries. *I chose a snickers and a coke while people watching and hoped for a decent meal during the flight. *When I saw the foil bag my heart sank and when I unwrapped the fare I had one thought in mind. *I wonder if they have any tripe?

I barely slept a wink. *I couldn't get comfortable in the room so I got up and outta there before the sunlight uncovered anything I had missed. *The silver lining was my early start allowed me to find a spot near a hotel with WiFi so I got on the phone and confirmed my flight to Bogota for later that day. *Now I had a couple hours to spare on a quiet Saturday morning and I decided to go check out the Miraflores Locks on the Panama Canal. *I rode around the city a while, got lost and then as happens most times I magically found the place I was going.



I had crossed the canal several times since arriving in Panama and was impressed by the engineering feat. *The locks were equally impressive although the visitor centre was being renovated and was not open. *I took walk around and looked things over as best I could before riding back to the airport's cargo terminal.



At the Miraflores Locks in Panama City, PA



A ship preparing to enter the locks with another in the locks eastbound.

A short while later I was at the Cargo docks in Tocumen having the bike and panniers inspected by Ms Doris and the crew from Girag Cargo.



The bike opened up and for the inspection of it's contents at Girag Cargo.



Ms Doris from Girag Cargo.



The crew from Girag Cargo.

It took a few hours to get the inspection and paperwork done. *I waited around a while but Doris explained that the bike would not be prepared for transport till later that day so I locked up the panniers, took a few photos of the bike and got a cab to the airport.

A few hours and one horrid meal later I was in Bogota, CO getting cleared at Immigration. *The process seems a bit more professional at the airports and I was in a cab heading to La Candeleria area of the city to find a hostel.

 
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2011, 04:22 PM   #88
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Bogota, CO (- kms)

I went to high school with a guy named Cory W. It was the first time I had heard from Cory since when he sent me a message months back. Several days ago he mentioned Monserrate as a must see while in Bogota. I never knew Cory to use the word "breathtaking" before and it surprised me, but at the end of the day he was bang on. That was the only way to describe the view ...and I was glad he had made the recommendation.



The last time I was as cold waking up was outside Whitehorse, Yukon a couple of months ago. It was -1C then and I was in a tent. Hostels in Columbia, or a least the one I had chosen to stay are clean, comfortable, open courtyard places with no heat. The thermometer read 11C and my shoes, sleeping bag and and two sweaters were on the bike somewhere in the skies above Columbia.



Room at La Candelaria Hostel in Bogota, CO.

I got up early, had a tepid shower and went for a cruise to get some fruit for breakfast. An hour later I had a pineapple, two bananas and a apple with my coffee and practiced Spanish with the young girl working the front desk. A high school friend had mentioned his time in Bogota and recommended I see Monserrate. I was skeptical when I left as the whole church thing in latin America is getting old. I don't think Cory W had the Cathedral in mind as the view from Monserrate overlooking the city was fantastic.



View of the courtyard at Monserrate.



View from Monserrate on Bogota Norte.



Even the Catholic church leaves their Christmas decorations up all year.



Shopping stalls on Monserrate.

I took the tram back down the mountain when I saw rain on the horizon. When I got back to the foot of the mountain on the edge town I was taken by the smell of a soup cooking. I ordered it up and when it hit the table I thought, "tripe ...this stuff is everywhere." So I gave it a go and in wasn't too bad.



The stuff smells great and other then the rubbery texture of the "meat" of the meal it ain't that bad.



Tripe soup at the base of Monserrate.



Enjoying tripe soup at the base of Monserrate.

Shortly thereafter as I walked down the hill, stomach distended from ...stomach, the skies opened up. I took shelter with a crowd of locals under an awning but after 50 mins I decided to make a break for it.



Rain in Bogota's La Candelaria district.

The remainder of the day I hung out at the hostel working on emails, napping and drinking coffee. Later in the evening I strolled down the street, grabbed some vino tinto and a couple Arepas stuffed with beef, chicken and cheese (carne, pollo a queso).



Arepas stuffed with beef, chicken and cheese.

I don't know whether to blame the wine or the Arepas. I have not had either at 2600 meters before but I woke up in bed with my computer on the floor beside me. So much for late night writing.

Tomorrow I pick up my bike at Girag Cargo.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2011, 04:22 PM   #89
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Bogota, CO (23 kms)

At times it is difficult to know where everyone in the hostel is from. *There are varying accents, some speaking fluent Spanish and others muddling through with me. *Almost alway the second question after the introduction is "where are you from?" *but in this case it wasn't necessary. *Can anyone spot the two girls from the Netherlands?



It was Bogota groundhog day take two. *The room was frigid and I was up early for another lukewarm shower. *I strolled out of the hostel for a walk around La Candelaria district before Bogota traffic got on the go. *My first chore was to land some insurance for the bike which is compulsory in Columbia. *I have heard different story's but the one I got from SOAT was that only year long policies are available and I was stung with a hefty bill for the coverage. *On the bright side if I come back to Columbia later in the journey I'm covered.

The remainder of the day was anything but smooth and a tremendous hassle claiming the bike. *Fortunately my cab driver Carlos was a great help and did what he could to help me out as was the customs agent Bertha. **

Bertha from Columbia Customs.



Carlos the cab driver / fixer in Bogota

I wasn't much in the mood for photos at the Cargo terminal and despite the two hour wait after my paperwork was done I didn't take a photo. *On the bright side all that tension melted away when on got on the 'Ol Girl and drove into Bogota and back to the hostel.

The plan was to park the bike inside the hostel but the 'Ol Girls hips were a little too big and we couldn't shoe horn her in.



The 'Ol Girls hips are just a bit too big for La Candelaria Hostel.

The hostel worked things out at a car park across the street and I put the bike there for the night. *I went out for supper with two friends travelling from the Netherlands and we wondered around in the rain till we settled on a spot that had one kind of meat on the menu. *Lots!



A carnivores dream in Bogota.

The meal was as heavy as they come and everyone was a little slow heading back to the hostel. *I figured I would have a bout of the meat sweats but the room was way too cold and the half cow I devoured kept me warm for the remainder of the night.

Tomorrow I will go north towards Chiquinquira on my way north to find the sun.
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2011, 04:24 PM   #90
BluNozr OP
Studly Adventurer
 
BluNozr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Oddometer: 507
Chiquinquira, CO (137 kms)

I had just finished packing the bike when a couple emerged from the hostel across the street.* Asdrubal and Angela are a friendly couple who live in Medellin and were in town for a bike service.* They had also lived in the northeastern United States and Angela who hails from the Dominican Republic and I had more then motorcycles in common.

*Asdrubal mentioned that they lived in Boston and if they were baseball fans.* It turns out Asdrubal in not much of a baseball fan and prefers football but Angela like myself is a Red Sox fan. *They had to be good people! *They invited my to stay with them in Medellin when I came through town and wouldn’t take no for an answer.

Energized by the nice chat and bright sunshine I rode north out of Bogota to the small town of Zipaquira to check out the Cathedral de Sal.



Miner's memorial outside the Cathedral de Sal.

The abandoned salt mine had been reclaimed by the local community converted into a Cathedral. Spurs off the main shaft had alters carved in the soft stone and near the end of the mine shaft was what appeared to be the main alter.



Alter in the Cathedral de Sal.



Overlooking the main alter of the Cathedral de Sal.



Miner's art in the Cathedral de Sal.



Miner's memorial within the Cathedral de Sal.

I knew the sun was shinning outside and after exploring the depths of the converted mine I hurried out to the sunshine that was still beaming.



Outside the Cathedral de Sal in Zipaquira, CO.

The riding north was good but traffic was heaving so I pulled into the town of Chiqiunquira for the day.* I had some laundry done and enjoyed a nice meal before finding a small café on the center square to do so work sorting photos and video.

 
BluNozr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014