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Old 10-19-2012, 05:55 AM   #61
NJ-Brett
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That cd250 looks fantastic!
The FI on the TU 250 is a quality setup and not any kind of nightmare, its easy to trouble shoot in the event you would ever have a problem with it, which is VERY unlikely.
If you are not mentaly challenged, you can test every sensor, and the system even has fault codes for any bad part.
It also does not seem to be set lean like most carb bikes as its got a cat in the exhaust and air injection, which allows Suzuki to set the mixture right without failing EPA testing.

And don't compare a 125 2 stroke to a 150 4 stroke, the 2 stroke can make close to 20 hp, the 150cc 4 stroke single is going to make 12.
If it does over 55 mph its in free fall off a cliff.

Also, a good used low mile TU, with say under 1000 miles on it goes for UNDER $3000.00 and they do not even break in and run their best till about 4000 miles.
A more trouble free bike you will not find, and I expect mine to go over 80,000 miles without any issues.

I could see a smaller bike like the SYM or Cleveland Cycle Works bikes as a vintage dual sport kind of thing, the TU sucks big time in the dirt.
And there ARE old SL125's for sale around here, I am tempted as they look so nice, but 125cc of 4 stroke power just might not be enough to have any fun on.
A late model SL350 would be the ticket for me.




Quote:
Originally Posted by RED1 View Post
The SYM sort of reminds me of the CD250U sold in australia from 1989 to 1992 when the nighthawk 250 took over, same engine, twin carbs on the CD to single on the CB.



The CB125E went on sale in australia last year and became a big hit, sold out at $2000AUD!, comes in three colours, red, white or blue, this bike is made in china.





These also sell well, a smaller clone of the CBR250R, CBR125, they come in repsol, black or tri colour, $4000AUD, made in thailand. 125's are alive and well depending where you live!


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Old 10-19-2012, 07:15 AM   #62
sealsam
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[QUOTE=mojave;17470572]The Wolf is running strong! Linda got her learner's permit a couple weeks ago and has started her street riding in style. Today we rode out to Panamint Valley in chilly 50 degree temp. Last week up Nine Mile Canyon to Kennedy Meadows and then Randsburg. The Wolf does pretty well - goes up the grades out here at a steady 60mph, it's fast enough for desert highways.

Got 80mpg and 84mpg on the last two tanks. BTW, the tank holds 2.5 gallons not the 3 gallons listed in the specs. The gas light comes on at about 180-185 miles, there is about one quart in reserve so about 20 more miles to run out.

Is Mojave still here? ...and how is the Wolf working out?
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Old 10-19-2012, 07:27 AM   #63
Davidc83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
First of all, I plan to buy one of these-soon. As soon as my local SYM dealer can get one in. They had one that I gave a good looking over, and was about to buy it but someone bought it right out from under my nose.

First of all, you cannot in any way compare this to the TU250. They are the same quality, that's about it. The Wolf is 100cc smaller, but I have two 125cc scooters and one 150cc scooter (Genuine Stella 2 stroke) I recently owned a Kawasaki Eliminator 125, built in Thailand. While I own bigger bikes, these small bikes are just a blast to ride. I can get a brand new Wolf for $3199 OTD. A TU250 from a Japanese powersports emporium will cost you $5000 OTD, by the time they add on all the bogus dealer fees Japanese dealers are famous for. So it is not a $1000 difference, it is almost a $2000 difference.


The Wolf has a centerstand (wow you can actually fix a flat out on the road) and a kickstarter. It also has a good old fashioned carb that you can work on, instead of the TU250s nightmare EFI.

The Wolf looks better than the TU250, and should at least have the performance of the Eliminator 125, which I found fine for a small bike. Better yet, the Wolf is freeway legal. Though NOT legal, I have ridden my Vino 125 hundreds of miles on the freeway without any issues at all, maintaining 50-55 mph. Just stay in the right lane, wear high visibility clothing, and you will be fine. This does not include urban freeways, which are about the same as demolition derbys. I'm afraid to ride my 1100cc cruiser on those.


As far as getting a "real" Honda, when is the last time you saw a Honda CB125 for sale? And as for getting parts for a 30 year old Honda it's not going to happen. Honda builds high quality bikes, but they are built to be disposable. Once past 10 years old, parts availability starts getting sketchy. My local powersports emporium will not even order parts for a bike more than 10 years old. Thank goodness for places like cheapcycleparts.com and bikebandit.com, though even they will not have parts for a 30 year old Honda.


SYM IS NOT a Chinese manufacturer. They are Taiwanese, and have the same quality as Kymco. And most of their dealers will not rip you off with bogus fees like Japanese dealers will. Apparently the Taiwanese have not yet learned this practice.


Read the ride report by the couple who rode 25,000 miles on two SYM Symbas. Those are 100cc Cub replicas. SYM has built over half the Cubs ever sold by Honda. I was actually looking for a Symba when I found the Wolf, and just had to have it.

Hey Jerry H, welcome to the adv forum.
FYI: you are not going to get too many people agreeing with you on the FI issue (same as on the other forum we are on).
You have a Wolf now? If so, how about doing a complete write up on here about it, I am always looking for different bikes to own.
By the way, my 2007 C50 cruiser with FI now has 57,000 miles with no issues with the FI, except needing its 3 set of spark plugs it has ever had in it a couple of weeks ago. My 2009 G650gs with FI just rolled over 30,000+ miles with no FI issues and still on the OEM spark plugs.
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Old 10-19-2012, 11:17 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davidc83 View Post
Hey Jerry H, welcome to the adv forum.
FYI: you are not going to get too many people agreeing with you on the FI issue (same as on the other forum we are on).
You have a Wolf now? If so, how about doing a complete write up on here about it, I am always looking for different bikes to own.
By the way, my 2007 C50 cruiser with FI now has 57,000 miles with no issues with the FI, except needing its 3 set of spark plugs it has ever had in it a couple of weeks ago. My 2009 G650gs with FI just rolled over 30,000+ miles with no FI issues and still on the OEM spark plugs.

I am still waiting on the dealer to get one in. But I have read enough about it to know it is the bike for me. My opinion on FI is just that, my opinion. But even if it is trouble free, I don't want it on a motorcycle. I want my motorcycles to be free of electronics. They are toys, and are my ESCAPE from all the electronic technology I am surrounded by all the time.

I admit having considered the TU, and in the end it was it's lack of a centerstand that made me decide against it. If it had tubeless tires, that wouldn't be such a big deal, but I won't ride a streetbike that doesn't have a way to get the wheels off to fix a flat out on the road (I started out riding streetbikes back in the '70s, when they had centerstands and tube type tires, and must have fixed at least 20 flats that way) I even have a centerstand on my XT. And I also have a kickstarter on it. It's a great feeling to be able to kick start a bike, something I haven't been able to do in many years.


The looks of a bike are also important to me. I absolutely hate the way bikes look now. That CD250U looks great, the rest of those bikes look like something from a cartoon. The Wolf looks like a bike should look.

And while I've seen this brought up many times, you can't compare used to new. For the price of a new TU250, OTD, you could get all kinds of nice used bikes, more than 4 times bigger. I just looked at an '05 Honda Shadow Sabre 1100 with 7,000+ miles on it, almost like new, for $4495 OTD, from a dealer. You can do better with a private sale.

If Suzuki had put a carb, centerstand, and a kickstarter on the TU250, they would have had me as a customer.

While I have not seen a CB125 for sale in recent memory, I have found quite a few nice UJMs out there on Craigslist, and every time I see one I like, I go to the online parts places, and it is always the same thing. No parts available.
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Old 10-19-2012, 11:44 AM   #65
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I don't know what the warranty is on the Wolf, but the SYK,Kymco, and PGO/Genuinescooters, all made in Taiwan, come with a two year warranty. That warrantyis simply the best in the business. Honda,Suzuki, Yamaha, and even Vespa,only give a one year warranty. My Kymco People 150 and my wife's SYM HD200 are both fantastic scooters. The SYM is a powerhouse for a 172cc scooter. The People 150 is a reliable workhorse that I can cruise at 55 on and get 80+ mpg. These makers are way above the Chinese scooter makers where quality is a crap shoot.
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Old 10-19-2012, 01:24 PM   #66
NJ-Brett
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I used to change all my tires also, and it was no problem to do so on the side of the road on my old Triumphs.
Besides the center stand, the modern rims on bikes like the TU have built in rim locks which makes it most unplesant to change your own tires.
The TU was the worst bike I ever changed a tire on, and it took 85 psi to seat the bead.
But its a light bike and modern tires are strong and thick (but not the stock ones) and they do not seem to get flats.

Also, any modern bike will have electronics, CDI ignition systems, and the charging system is electonics as well.
More people have CDI boxes go out, and regulators fail then have FI problems.

And, you can add a kick start to a TU, the case has the hole and you can order the kick start parts if you wanted to.

I like carbs, but FI ( at least on the TU) is nice, push the button and go, no choke, no petcock, no warm up, the bike just always runs great.
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Old 10-19-2012, 01:59 PM   #67
JerryH
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I do own a scooter with FI, a 2012 Yamaha Zuma 125. I also have an '08 Vino 125. The Vino has over 20,000 miles on it and still runs like new. Never had a carb problem, and it starts just as easily as the Zuma. A carb is about as foolproof as it gets. About the only thing that can possibly go wrong with them is they get dirty from sitting for a long time with gas in them. All you have to do is clean them out, and they work like new. FI has several hundred $$$ worth of computerized electronics which can fail. Most of my job is working on these systems on cars, for a large city fleet department. I stay plenty busy, and I usually go through at least a thousand dollars in parts a day. It is usually the sensors, or various "modules" sealed in epoxy black boxes. I have replaced very few main computers.

Yes I know about CDI ignition, and electronic regulator/rectifiers. CDI ignition goes back to the early '70s. It's "digital" electronics I have an issue with on motor vehicles. I have been an amateur radio operator for more than 30 years, and I enjoyed building and repairing old tube radios. Some people would call that electronics, and I guess it was in a way. But it was completely different from todays digital stuff. Digital equipment is what ruined the hobby for me. Stuff that nobody could work on. It definitely took the "amateur" out of amateur radio, the same way that digital stuff on modern vehicles is making them off limits to amateur mechanics that like to work on and tinker with their vehicles, motorcycles especially.

I see the Wolf as the most basic motorcycle you can buy today. I had a Honda Rebel, but it lacked a centerstand, and did not fit me. The Wolf is a lot better fit. The Royal Enfield used to be pretty basic, but it is very poor quality, and now it has FI. Put the two together and you have a disaster in the making. Made in India electronics? Though I suspect that a large part of the electronic problems I run into are due to poor quality. Seems they are all made in third world countries. I don't believe I have ever seen any auto electronics that were made in the U.S.

As for tires, I have owned a total of 41 motorcycles since age 16, and have always mounted my own tires. I have never had a motorcycle tire removed or installed by a shop, and that includes Goldwing tires and those huge rear tires on some cruisers. I have changed hundreds of dirt bike tires. I also had a Triumph, a '66 Bonneville, and fixed at least 3-4 flats on that on the road. I would not have been able to if it had not had a centerstand. Manufacturers COULD use the type of wire spoke wheels BMW uses, or that Honda used on the '86-'87 450 Rebel, that use tubeless tires. Somehow it just doesn't make sense to me. FI, ABS, and TUBE type tires? Why use tire technology that cars haven't used since the 1940s?
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Old 10-19-2012, 03:19 PM   #68
Davidc83
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[QUOTE=Why use tire technology that cars haven't used since the 1940s?[/QUOTE]

It is called spoked wheels; when you have holes in the wheels for the spokes, you have holes for air to escape from the tire.
Most BMWs wheels use tubeless tires because they are mag wheels; my BMW with spoked wheels have tubed tires. Yes, I would prefer tubeless tires with mag wheels, but those are usually more $$$$ for a specific model (except Harley where the spoked wheels actually cost more than the mags).
Yes, there are systems out there you can use to make spoked wheels tubeless, but those can be un-reliable and cause flats if they fail (yep, seen it happen).
Mag wheels do have disadvantages, less stable in high winds, easier to bend than spokes, harder to impossible to make true if they get bent or warped.
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:23 PM   #69
NJ-Brett
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Hey, we sound like twins!
I built all my own ham radio gear, receivers and transmitters, all tubes.
Pair of 813's with 4cx250b's as modulators is the big rig.
Single conversion superhet receivers, the first one uses octal tubes...

The TU is the first bike I ever paid someone to change tires on, and I am going to keep paying.
I would rather get more flats and be able to change tires like I used to then deal with modern rims they have on the TU.
I wonder if the Wolf has the same nasty rim locks.
Old bikes are/were SO easy...

Carbs are foolproof, love pumper carbs on thumpers, but I cant say I ever had any FI sensor failures on cars or bikes, some very old, and even old Jaguars (1990).
I did have a new Passat (2003) that was a total mess, but it was a mess on day 2 and just kept getting worse.

I just think 150cc's is a bit small for what I do with a bike, FI or not.
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:15 PM   #70
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Quote:
Is Mojave still here? ...and how is the Wolf working out?
yeah, I'm still here, well, kind of. facing 3 level cervical spine fusion surgery in a few weeks, not happy about that. I'll be off bikes for a few months afterward.

Linda got her M1 a few weeks ago, we go on rides now and then. The Wolf is doing just fine with 2,200 miles now. I have the jetting better for altitude so it moves along at 7000 feet plus. About time for a new rear tire.

The only thing that was changed on it are some cracks have formed in the rubber stalks of the rear blinkers.

She is kind of interested in a larger bike - wants to do a Saddle Sore 1000. Maybe after my return I'll be on the lookout for a Ninja 250 or something. It would be interesting to do a SS1000 on a Wolf but it would be tight as there would be no super slab... kind of hard to figure out a 1000 mile course without significant high speed traffic. I don't fancy being passed on a dark Nevada highway by a 18 wheeler that's going 75 mph!

But we've discussed it. I plotted a course that starts in St George, down to Page, over to Cortez, wanders back through Utah. I've traveled all these roads and you can keep the speed up. Start late afternoon with Zion and Bryce, the desert sections in the night, the nice Utah the next day. Try to average 50 mph with breaks, have to average 42 to make the 24 hours. Late spring would be best.I would like to do it too but I'm doubtful I'll be up for it before summer.
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Old 10-20-2012, 11:43 AM   #71
JerryH
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BMW has made several models with wire spoked wheels and tubeless tires. And they were not rigged. The wheels were especially designed for tubleless tires. The BMWR1200C and R1150GS are good examples, though there are others. Also check out the wheels on the late '80s Honda Rebel 450. Again, wire spoked wheels designed by the factory to run tubeless tires. This technology is decades old, yet is still not being used. I have no idea why.

Not sure what you mean by "rim locks" The only rim locks I've ever seen are on dirt and dual sport bikes, to prevent the tires from turning on the wheels when running low tire pressure. They are bolt on, and the stud that holds them in place sticks through the rim and looks like a valve stem. Decades ago we drilled holes in the rims and used sheet metal screws through the rim and into the tire bead ton hold the tires in place. I have never seen any type of rim lock on a street bike wheel. What are you going to do when you have a flat out on the road (I've had plenty, which is why I insist on being prepared for them)

Cracks in the rubber does not sound good, and is a sign of poor quality materials, something I was not expecting from SYM. Really old Japanese bikes used to use poor quality rubber that cracked easily, but they quickly fixed that by using something better. I remember the old bikes had rubber on the pegs, shifter, even rubber grips that cracked right away. I have had some issues with the rubber parts on my Genuine Stella, but that was expected, since it was made in India. You can buy aftermarket parts to fix most of those issues. But then the Stella is the same as a vintage Vespa, so parts made for a vintage Vespa fit it.


I would not go with a Ninja 250 for your wife unless she is sure about it. They have an extremely uncomfortable riding position, and feel top heavy. I don't know how tall she is, but a 250cc cruiser might be a better fit. If she fits, a Rebel will easily maintain near 80 mph all day. If it is to small, the TU250, or V-Star 250 are also good bikes, but again, if you have a flat out on the road on one, you've pretty much lost your shot at the SS1000. I have done 2 SS1000s, both on a Vulcan 750, which has shaft drive, tubeless tires, and a centerstand.

Oh, and BTW, I now have over 70,000 miles on that bike, which has carbs, and have never had any problems with them. They have never been off, which is a good thing. Due to poor design, they are a major PITA to remove and put back on. I do run a little Seafoam through them once in a while, as well as drain the float bowls every few months.
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2002 Vulcan 750, 2013 Royal Enfield B5
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Old 10-20-2012, 02:22 PM   #72
JerryH
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Have spent a couple od days on symforums.com, and apparently there are some quality issues with SYM products. Members are reporting paint fading, cracking rubber and plastic, and engines dying while riding in the rain. Also problems with rust and soft bolts. All of this on nearly new bikes. Also, it seems as though Alliance Powersports is refusing to sell service manuals and repair and maintenance parts, and will void that 2 year warranty if all maintenance and repair is not done by a dealer. That is not legal in the U.S., but it looks like they are doing it anyway. I will do some more research on these issues, but so far it seems pretty disappointing. I don't want to spend $3200 on a POS bike that is going to fall apart on me. Until now, everything I have heard about SYM has been good. These sound like issues common to Chinese scooters that sell for 1/3 the price.
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I won't spend more on a bike than I think it's worth, but if it's a good deal, I don't seem to have a problem buying bikes I don't need.
2002 Vulcan 750, 2013 Royal Enfield B5
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:35 AM   #73
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JerryH,

I've not done a SS1000 but I have ridden big days that with just another couple hours would have cracked 1000 miles. Linda is interested because she runs ultramarathons. She has completed many mountain trail 100 mile races that have taken 24 to 35 hours. So she collects endurance events. If she likes the format (if she receives a fine cane-ing, that is) she might get into the Ironbutt world.

Linda is a shortypants at 5'3" 115 pounds. She can control 1000 pound horses but seems a little lost holding up a motorcycle.

I'm sorry,, and no offense I hope, but I think beginner cruisers are an abomination, especially the 250's. Some of those bikes are not much more capable than the Wolf and weigh 70 - 100 pounds more. I won't have one in MY garage.

I've been riding tubed tire bikes for 40 years. Have had many many offroad and dualsport flats. On her bike I could repair a flat in 15 minutes or so. She couldn't repair it to save her life! I think attempting a SS1000 on the Wolf is interesting but kind of a longshot - I would be doing it with her. If she gets into the madness I'm sure she will have a different bike with tubeless tires.

The TUV is STILL NOT available in Kailfronia.

There are the old bikes but most have met their demise in the stupid hack off the fenders and paint it black and call it a cafe racer craze. After that narrow selection of beginner crusiers and old junk the curb weight jumps to 400+ pounds and there are lots of choices. I owned a EX500 for a while and think that's a candidate.

I currently own a WR250R and one of those lowered 4 inches would make a fine 300# road burner for her. Would have to seriously improve the seat though. But a suspension modified WRR/X would cost $5K, and she doesn't like the style.

Used first gen Ninja 250's are all over the place. I've ridden a couple first gens and didn't think they were uncomfortable or particularly top heavy.You have to ring their pencil necks but they do go. A couple days ago she sat a 2nd gen in a show room and the seating position looked fine. BTW, I WAS surprised at how heavy IT felt. That seat is known to be less than stellar but that can be changed. CBR250's are popping up used, and I've seen a few of those sheeting along at 75mph on the freeway.

Regarding the comments you relayed about SYM quality. I recognize most of the them from the SYM forums. In comparison to the many more positive experiences I say it doesn't seem any worse than any Japanese bike and certainly better than some Euro models (I owned an 03 Multistrada!). Any hamfisted ape can twist off fasteners, and leaving bikes out in the weather is how all those Honda/Suz/Kaw/Yam's got rusty and faded. All of the rubber other than the stalks seems perfect so I think these blinkers are just sourced parts that are a little cheesy. I've no idea about Alliance as I'm not needed them to do anything. If they stonewall customers too much then they will fade away.

My approach and attitude toward the Wolf (having owned 100+ motorcycles over 40 years) may not be a good example for a first time motorcycle buyer. I've change enough on our Wolfie to not expect the warranty to be honored. It is stripped of all smog junk, has a Cam exhaust (drilled out even), and is the epitome of what a law abiding citizen SHOULD NOT do to a DOT/CARB compliant bike! I would imagine Alliance would laugh in my face. On the other hand I'm assuming this little motor will hold up to the constant 7,000 rpm trashing it's getting . So far the valves have not moved a micron and everything else except the blinker stalks is as new. I couldn't say that about the KLX300 I had that apparently had intake valves made out of cast zinc.

If someone develops a bigbore kit for the Wolf I'll be first in line!
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mojave screwed with this post 10-21-2012 at 08:08 AM
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:27 AM   #74
Birdmove
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What can a stock Wolf do as far as cruising speeds? I'm 5'10" and about 190 currently. I live on the Big Island of Hawaii, and there are no "freeways" here.
As for SYM quality, we have a SYM HD200 which I consider it to be maybe the best buy in scooters period. Reliable, very powerful for a 172cc, two year warranty, comfortable, well made.
I'll soon be 59 and started riding at 8 and have never been without a motorcycle till now. I ride a Kymco People 150 currently. I owned a 2007 Royal Enfield Bullet for a few years, but decided not to bring it to Hawaii when we moved. I sold all 3 of my motorcycles when we moved. The Bullet, a Yamaha XT225, and a 2006 XL883 Sportster.
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:25 PM   #75
JerryH
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Sounds like your wife would have no problem with a Ninja 250 or 500 then. I've had both, a '93 Ninja 250 and an '09 Ninja 500. The 250 wasn't that uncomfortable, but it was to small for me at 6' 220 with a 34" inseam. I did put over 8,000 miles on it. The stock gearing on a first gen Ninja 250 is too low, both in first gear and top gear. Going to a 15 tooth front sprocket made it perfect. With the 15 tooth front sprocket, it does fine on the freeway, and also works great around town, no clutch slipping needed. It will actually make it all the way across an intersection without having to be shifted. However, the '08 and up is a completely different bike, and is far more sporting oriented. The bars are lower and farther forward, the seat, if you can even call it a seat, is a tiny hard as a rock pad, and the pegs seem higher and more rearset. I have not ridden one, but I did sit on one for about 15 minutes at a dealership while talking to a salesman. I was in pain just from having sat on it.

The dealer was having a fire sale on '09 EX500s, they had just got in a truck load of them, and they were not selling, probably due to the Ninja 650 and the ER-6N. I got mine brand new OTD for $4499, almost $1000 below MSRP. I was so happy about that price I never even sat on it before buying, in fact I made the deal over the phone and by email. I went in and picked it up, and on the 10 mile trip home, I was already beginning to believe I had made a mistake. Another 100 miles and I was sure. I put Genmar risers and a throttle lock on it, which helped, and I did manage to rack up over 5,000 miles on it, but the pain in my legs, arms, shoulders, and neck eventually became so bad that it was just no longer fun to ride, so I wound up selling it. I had an '88 EX500 back in '88, bought new, and easily put over 30,000 miles on it, I don't remember any issues other than the seat was getting uncomfortable after a few hundred miles. That is one thing about cruisers, they have comfortable seats.

I admit I am somewhat of a special case, as I have developed fairly severe arthritis and fibromyalgia, which I did not have back in '88. That makes almost anything painful especially riding a sport bike. If you can ride them without pain, I HIGHLY recommend either the '07 and older ninja 250, or any Ninja 500. They are both excellent bikes, both easily keep up with freeway traffic, and both are proven reliable.

As for the 250 cruisers, the only one I have actually ridden is the Honda Rebel. But I rode the wheels off it. I bought a used '04 Rebel with 1800 miles on it, and sold it with over 20,000 miles on it, most of them at WOT on the freeway. That little parallel twin is faster than you might think, and I'm sure I could (or could have) done an SS1000 on it. The problem with the Rebel is that it did not fit me. Honda designed it to be a 1/2 scale copy of a Harley, and they pretty much kept it to scale, so it doesn't fit anyone much over 5' tall. I installed a Protac backrest, and fabricated my own forward controls, which moved the pegs, shifter, and rear brake 4" farther forward. It would have been better to make them 4" lower, but that was not possible, but moving them forward made a lot more room for a tall rider to stretch out. I also removed a metal plate from inside the seat, which made it a lot softer. It would easily cruise at 75-80 all day long at full throttle on fairly level roads. Steep grades and headwinds slowed it down considerably. The owner of a Rebel forum I belonged too had put over 80,000 miles on a Rebel at WOT before the valves finally ate themselves. Those little motors are tough.


There IS one small cruiser worth considering if a sportbike is too uncomfortable, and that is the Vulcan 500. It feels much like a 250, has a very low seat and a very comfortable riding position, and best of all, it has the Ninja 500 motor, so it is way faster than any similar sized single or v-twin cruiser. I have a Vulcan 750 v-twin, and it is fast for a v-twin, outrunning many v-twins twice it's size. But it is only a couple tenths faster than the 500 in the 1/4 mile.


As for the Wolf, I am going back to give it a really good going over when the dealer gets in another one. It has the perfect look, it has a carb, centerstand, and kickstarter, and is a perfect size for riding around on non freeway roads. I put over 23,000 miles on a Yamaha Vino 125 doing just that, about 800 of those miles were on the freeway. It held a fairly steady 50 mph in the right lane, and I never felt like I was in danger from other traffic. A couple of times I came up behind vehicles pulling trailers that were slower than I was, and I just fell in behind them.


I would definitely remove any emissions crap, I am not a believer in that stuff. I have always removed all the emissions crap from every bike I ever owned. The Vulcan 750 had a 5 gal. bucket full of it. I would probably leave the exhaust alone. A 150cc single does not sound good to me with a loud exhaust, and then you have to rejet the carb. Rejetting is trial and error, I have had to pull carbs 3-4 times before before I got the jetting right.

I have never had any problems with deterioration of paint and rubber/plastic on any of the Japanese bikes I bought new, but they have all been garage kept. If it took years of sitting out in the weather to do it, that would be understandable. But from what I am reading, this is happing to nearly new bikes. So it is just wait and see on the Wolf for now.




I am 53, and also started riding at age 8, on an old Bultaco dirt bike that I worked on the farm all summer to buy. It soon seized up. My dad mixed the oil and gas, and probably got it wrong. But the local farm mechanic helped me rebuild it during the off season, and I rode it all over the countryside for the next 3 years or so. The Wolf should do about the same or a little better than the People 150, which loses a little speed because of it's CVT transmission. That is on level road. With it's manual transmission, the Wolf should easily outclimb the People. I have easily climbed mountains with a Trail 90 where my Vino 125 would bog down to a complete stop. Having really low gears on a small bike means everything when climbing. I understand there is a volcano in Hawaii (not sure which island) that has a 35 mile climb to the top. People take bicycles up to the top, and coast all the way down. The Wolf should have no problem with a road like that.

I am beginning to think the wolf and Symba are made by completely different manufacturers than SYM scooters. There is some connection between SYM and Lance, and Lance used to be one of the cheap Chinese scooter brands. The current Lance Cali Classic scooter says Lance in it, but many of the parts are stamped SYM, and come in boxes that have SYM written on them.

Kymco scooters have always had an excellent reputation, but their Vennox 250 motorcycle didn't do so well. Again I suspect different manufacturers, but with bikes nowadays, it's pretty much impossible to know who built what, no matter what name is on them. Many Japanese bikes are no longer Japanese.
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I won't spend more on a bike than I think it's worth, but if it's a good deal, I don't seem to have a problem buying bikes I don't need.
2002 Vulcan 750, 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
1980 Puch moped
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