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Old 09-23-2011, 07:53 AM   #16
jdub
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Great write-up, JC! I especially liked "Stripping a bike down is the best way to overcome that awe of new technology, finding out that they are all just nuts, bolts, tolerances and torques with no magic involved at all." Well said!
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Old 09-24-2011, 05:18 AM   #17
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R1200GS Adv - bike back together again!

R1200GS Adv - bike back together again!

The final day is a beatiful day. Warm and sunny. Put the new oil in the final drive. Re-attach all the fairings and tank etc on the bike. It was a good idea to leave all the bolts in place.



Throughout most of the build I had two items in my parts tub that I had no idea where they came from. A large thick washer and a small rubber bit. I often looked at these two items as I put the bike back together in case I found where they came from.

The bike was practically back together, bar the side and tank panels, crash bar and seat, and still I had these two pieces spare with no idea where they came from. I had found them on the ground some time after the start of the project.

On this final day with this rubber part still unaccounted for, I had the idea to Google the part number on the rubber item. Google turned up one result - someone asking the same question of where did this part come from - I laughed!. Fortunately someone answered.

Where the petrol tank-cap is removed, there are three rubber pieces under the unit that cushion is against the petrol tank opening. I did not realise this when taking off the top panel and petrol cap. See item no3 in photo below. I was very lucky it did not fall into the tank. Having discovered what this item was and that there should be three of them, I was rather concerned to find only one still attached to the filler cap unit. I had refitted the filler cap onto the tank during the project to keep dirt and dust out. Fortunately, after moving some sheets of cardboard, I found the last remaining rubber cushion on the ground.



They are springy little buggers and prone to fall out of place while tightening the bolts. To prevent them falling into the petrol tank, I cut out a piece of round cardboard and placed it in the hole so nothing could fall into the tank while tightening the bolts.

The other washer turned out to be for the crash guard. There is one each side at the bottom bracket to engine casing, both of differing thickness, and when attaching the right side I found the companion washer, so then figured out what this spare one was. phew!! All pieces accounted for. That must be a first!



All the pieces slowly went back on the bike without drama. I always follow the torque settings for bolts large and small alike.

Top box the last item to go back on.



Ready for the test ride. Starts up first touch of the button. Eases gently out onto the road with the new clutch working perfectly. Take her for a spin down the highway, high speed roll on acceleration, same as she ever was. WooHoo!!..

Now, what to do with the $1800 savings I made .. Ralle Moto anyone!
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:47 AM   #18
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Congrats on a job well done. You are an amazingly patient and meticulous person. It seems like I'll need to go to Australia and figure out what's in the water that makes you guys so "chill."

I may have missed this, but what parts did you replace besides the clutch disc and input seal? Any reason you didn't replace the pressure plate and flywheel? Low miles, maybe? I was lead to believe those are necessities. Of course, BMW techs told me that.

Thanks for sharing!
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Old 09-24-2011, 05:33 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by erkmania View Post
Congrats on a job well done. You are an amazingly patient and meticulous person. It seems like I'll need to go to Australia and figure out what's in the water that makes you guys so "chill."

I may have missed this, but what parts did you replace besides the clutch disc and input seal? Any reason you didn't replace the pressure plate and flywheel? Low miles, maybe? I was lead to believe those are necessities. Of course, BMW techs told me that.

Thanks for sharing!
Thanks. Knowing that any stuff up would be very expensive is what made me so meticulous and chill for this job. I could not afford to make any mistakes. Experience has shown me how easy it is to miss something when you try and rush a job like this, especially when it is the first time!

The only other parts I replaced are the 6 allen bolts to hold the clutch housing cover to the clutch housing. RepROM states these should be replaced.

I took a gamble on not replacing the whole clutch assembly. Chattering can occur if not all the clutch is replaced together due to wear and tear. However, with so few k's on the clutch and $'s in my pocket, I figured it was worth the risk. The pressure plates were mirror finish when I cleaned them off, so I do not think I will have any problems. Also, it would have added an extra $700-$800 to the spare parts bill to replace all. I was willing to risk another couple of weekends doing the whole thing again with new clutch plates if required. Second time round would be much quicker now I know all the pitfalls.

Having said that, if there was obvious wear and tear I would have replaced them then and there.

For BMW, it is best for them to replace the whole thing while they are in there so there is no comeback, and does not add extra time to the job. Probably actually slightly quicker just slapping new plates on rather than mucking around cleaning the old plates and trying to decide if they should replace them. Its peanuts for them in the scheme of things, and their bean counters have obviously done the sums to validate that decision to replace all.

The Other JC screwed with this post 09-28-2011 at 05:23 AM Reason: spelling
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:55 PM   #20
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One of the best show threads that we've seen here... thanks for sharing!
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Old 10-05-2011, 10:43 PM   #21
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Very Kool

Other JC...that was an outstanding record of how to DIY...thanks!
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Old 06-16-2012, 09:16 PM   #22
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JC. Just wanted to give a big thanks for your wonderfully documented thread on breaking the beast. It was a lot more than what I had the patience to post. I just completed a transmission swap and clutch replacement on a buddy's bike. This thing came in very handy!
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Old 06-16-2012, 09:51 PM   #23
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Wow!

I dont think I would ever considered tackling this. But after reading your thread I just might if ( no WHEN ) I need to. Great Job ! ! !
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Old 06-18-2012, 04:01 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXjames View Post
JC. Just wanted to give a big thanks for your wonderfully documented thread....
Hey James, glad it was of some minor use.
I was following your thread and am mighty impressed with the work that was done. These posts all add to the font of knowledge we seek to help free us from our Bavarian overlord.

Regards Julian
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Old 08-11-2012, 02:50 PM   #25
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This is most excellent. I've got the exact same problem: leaky tranny input seal.

After carefully removing everything as the manual says, I spent an hour tugging the rear section. That bolt at the right rear of the transmission, near the rear brake light switch..... forgot about it. Didn't see it mentioned in the manual either.

Anyway, my clutch looked even worse than yours. Grimey, greasy, burned. Thin, too. At 59000km. I'm going to have the steel surfaces machined and get a new Sachs disk. And a seal, of course.
Two wood screws is still my preferred method of getting seals out.
I had 700 ml of tranny oil left, so 100ml made it onto my clutch.

Advice to others attempting the same repair: the manual is spot on. I did not find any shortcuts, other than maybe leaving the right throttle body connected to the head.
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Old 08-12-2012, 01:47 AM   #26
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Releasing threaded fastener on rear frame

Quote:
Originally Posted by elvo View Post
That bolt at the right rear of the transmission, near the rear brake light switch..... forgot about it. Didn't see it mentioned in the manual either.
It's in there, blink and you will miss it though. All five bolts are mentioned in the same instruction set Releasing threaded fastener on rear frame in the section Removing rear section of motorcycle. It is shown in the picture with the frame lug, again, very easy to miss.

The instruction: Slacken screw (4).



The Other JC screwed with this post 08-12-2012 at 01:56 AM Reason: always a spelling error ...arrrrhhhh
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Old 08-13-2012, 01:22 AM   #27
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It's in there, blink and you will miss it though.
Indeed, it was my mistake, not BMW's.
BTW what a bitch it was to remove as well. It was the last bolt, so it was under tension. And I couldn't get a ratchet in there, it just didn't work out with the extension and the universal joint. Resorted to spinning the torx bit with a 10 mm open-ended wrench.
With the REPROM, I find myself wrenching through as many steps as I can remember, and checking the computer on breaks. I still prefer old-style printed manuals, they're more resistant to greasy fingers

Next up: sourcing clutch, seal. Belt, while I'm at it. I will gladly accept suggestions for small items which really should be replaced, while the bike is apart.
Speaking of which: the ball joint on the lower triple clamp, part of the telever. Mine has a rubber boot. (a.k.a. elephant condom) It's worn. I can't find it on the parts fiche

With the back half off, maybe it's a good time to replace the final drive oil? I'm sure I can flip the whole back end over to drain the oil. It's surprisingly light. In fact, with the tank and muffler and seat off, the entire bike feels very light.

The gearbox input seal had a rubber-sealed bearing behind it. I don't like rubber-sealed bearings in gearboxes. There is a Porsche horror story around: sealed bearings contain (lithium?) grease supposed to last the lifetime of the bearings. Gearbox heats up, grease melts and seeps out, and collects at the drain magnet. Bearings run dry thus hot, and fail.
But anyway, When I pulled the seal out, a big blob of oil gushed out. It was trapped between the seal and the rubber-sealed bearing. I think having the rubber-sealed bearing in there creates an extra chamber to build up pressure in, working the seal harder.
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Old 08-14-2012, 09:43 AM   #28
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You may want to replace the felt ring on the pushrod shaft; it's not required but cheap and good insurance in the case of a clutch slave leak. The manual also calls for new clutch housing bolts.

Here's a list of items I purchased on my recent transmission swap (old input seal leaked and clutch contaminated). Note that there are a few items in this list that are unrelated to the transmission work (i.e. crash bar hardware).

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Old 08-14-2012, 10:34 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXjames View Post
You may want to replace the felt ring on the pushrod shaft; it's not required but cheap and good insurance in the case of a clutch slave leak. The manual also calls for new clutch housing bolts.

Here's a list of items I purchased on my recent transmission swap (old input seal leaked and clutch contaminated). Note that there are a few items in this list that are unrelated to the transmission work (i.e. crash bar hardware).

You forgot just buy a tranny from Lithiuania for $500 Honestly, I would be suspect of input bearing on any of these that have developed a leak after what we saw in SlowOldGuys tranny
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Old 08-19-2012, 11:41 AM   #30
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OK, clutch is in.


The one godd4mn bolt near the brake pedal, my worst foe during disassembly, became my best friend during assembly. I believe the manual says to put in in first. It allows you to draw the two bike halves together and insert to other 4 frame bolts.
It also allows you to lever the driveshaft in place. If it's not there, you lever the bike apart again.
Speaking of driveshaft, I popped it out at the other end, at the final drive The final drive end spline is telescopic, the gearbox end spline pops into a groove. Taking the rear wheel off while the bike is still in half takes a second person and some wood blocks. And patience, to get the ABS sensor and rear caliper off. You lose half an hour. The manual does warn you, several times. Oh well, I got to see the inside of the cast rear suspension arm. It's a masterpiece. Very light.
So yeah, if you have to disassemble the rear drive, it's a good time to change its oil.
Bike is back together, rear fender is on, clutch slave is on, muffler is on. Now I need to bleed the ABS brake lines.

Looking at TXj's list: you can get a SACHS clutch disk for half the price! I got my stuff here: www.dehobbyist.nl . My alternator belt still looked brand new, so i didn't replace it. Didn't replace the clutch housing bolts either, but I can see why you would want to, their faces are serrated. I did put a mini dab of loctite on. BTW, aligning the clutch was easy: I aligned the disk in my hand, squeezed the two metal disks together, and the remaining rust kept the three parts together and aligned. Put the tranny on and tightened all the bolts. Easy peasy, Germanese-y.
What I should have done is replaced the balancer shaft seal. It looked to be the same as the gearbox input shaft.
Ah, and speaking of gearbox input shaft seal: I pressed it in just a little further. 0.75mm deeper. I wanted it to clear the splines a little better.

Further filosturbating: I had expected the clutch to be larger. It looks undersized for a 110hp motor.
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