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Old 10-06-2011, 04:25 PM   #76
Dieselboy OP
Journey not Destination
 
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Location: Port of the Gasparilla
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Originally Posted by YetiGS View Post
You are a brave, brave man.




Or insane.





Fine line and all that. It's debated amongst those in the "know" frequently. Unless you are speaking to my daughter, she's firmly in the "insane" camp.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:26 PM   #77
Dieselboy OP
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The engine stand works. I mounted it first thing this morning. My new estimate of engine weight is 80-125 lbs. I hefted it off of the bench and on to the stand by myself.


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First things first. Water pump. Appears to be fine. The impeller and the drive gear spin on a shaft. The shaft does not move. So I think the tactile feedback of touch the end of the shaft gave a false sense that there was a problem.


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Oil pan. Flip goes the engine and let me say that doing this with a stand is a really, really good idea.....some extra oil (I think there was 400ml left throughout).


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There are three bolts that hold down the gasket.


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Front is to the left. Under the gasket is the “cover”. The three red zip ties point out the three bolt that held in the gasket. This is good to know because there are several more bolts that hold the cover and they look just like the one that were on the gasket. So to point out the obvious, don’t put bolts in the wrong holes on reassembly.


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Cover off. Hello Mr Counter Balancer.


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Note the spring location and orientation. It was not a flight risk. Low tension.


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Flip. Right cover up.


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Stator.


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Flip. Left side.


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Remove the crank locking pin.


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Dip stick out. This is probably understood but it wasn’t specifically mentioned in the book.


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Shift lever. Likewise not mentioned earlier. I may have missed it but I don’t think so. Before I moved it, I made a mark of it’s alignment with a red sharpie.



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Left cover up. Selector shaft marked by red zip tie comes out now.



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The book says this washer can stay on the cover. It decided other wise. Tagged and bagged.


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Old 10-06-2011, 04:28 PM   #78
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Flip. Bolts for the bottom crank cover come off now. 14 bolts. Two are to the front where I have the red zip tie pointing. The others are on the left side of the picture towards the rear of the engine.


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These two are bigger. Than the others.



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I marked them with red zip ties. Just forward is another bolt marked with yellow. It is shorter that the majority.


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The two to the front of the engine match the other yellow odd ball.

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Remove retaining pin (marked with red zip tie).


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Slide out bearing stud. Book says use a slide hammer. I just pushed it out with that zip tie.


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Another shot of the bearing stud. Hole points out to the left as the engine is currently oriented. Threads are what the slide hammer was supposed to attach to.


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“Pivot balancing swing arm up”.


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Remove 9 screws. ( I only marked 8 for some reason).



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Green ones are different lengths.


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Work the bottom half of the crank case off. “Making sure that the bearing shells do not fall out of the crankcase half.” Marked with red zip ties in the second pic.


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Carefully lower the balancing conrod to ensure the sealing face is not damaged. This was an oops on my part. It did ding the edge a little. Not enough to be an issue.


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This is my kind of art work. Isn’t it beautiful....


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“ Lift gearbox output shaft up slightly” = 1 or 2 mm. Remove shaft sealing ring marked by the red ziptie.


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“Mark main bearing caps prior to removal to ensure that they can be reinstalled in their original positions.” I chose L & R but should have used 2 & 1 respectively because I later found the case was actually stamped that way.


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I went a step farther and marked the bolt locations as well. Not necessary but...


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Caps were stubborn. It took considerably wiggling to get the oil to let go. The #2 cap required a firmer grip.


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Using a “suitable provisional support”, or in my case a paint roller handle, move the crank shaft up and hold in place.


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Note the way I am holding the counter balancer and the wooden handle. This is how you should control this mechanism. The pistons will move and the connector rods with rotate on you. This handhold will maintain control of the mass and allow you to gentle lower the crank. Also note that I have padding on the case edge now. Too late for me but you can avoid a ding hopefully.


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Remove old timing chain (cut the zip tie first).


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Replace tensioner rail. Remove screw first. New rail in with 10nm and locktite 243.


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Old rail right. Note the scoring at the tips. Otherwise looks good.


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And now for the main event: replace the cam chain.


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Blurry picture of my ding. Bottom center edge of case.


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Before lowering crank, lube bearing seats.


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My caps had “48” written on the side.

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Reseat caps.


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Initial torque is 15nm. Tightening pattern is specified as 2, 3, 4, 1, 6, 7, 8, 5. (My wrench is in the 1 position in the picture). Count left to right starting at the top.

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Interlude. Need to final torque to 45 degrees +/- 5. I opted to not pay for the $54 Napa version of an angle torque gauge. I made my own.


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Time to reassemble. But first:


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Must to be cleaning.


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That one case took 45 minutes. I needed a break so I decided to update the thread. The cleaning of the mating surfaces is probably one of the most important steps to this project so I’m taking my time.


Back to rowing....
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Old 10-06-2011, 06:22 PM   #79
zaner32
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Big job! In my first post in this thread, I though you could route the chain by the end of the shaft and onto the gear. The way that shaft sits in it's journal, there's no way you can do this job without taking basically all the covers off. Good stuff! Thanks for taking the time to write this up.
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:44 PM   #80
Bayner
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That's a lot of work. We definitely need a simpler master link type solution. Having said that, from what you've seen so far would it be possible to remove the side covers and sneak new guide rails in there?
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:42 PM   #81
Dieselboy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zaner32 View Post
... there's no way you can do this job without taking basically all the covers off...


No and that's the rub. We definitely could benefit from a master link chain.
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:47 PM   #82
Dieselboy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayner View Post
That's a lot of work. We definitely need a simpler master link type solution. Having said that, from what you've seen so far would it be possible to remove the side covers and sneak new guide rails in there?
Absolutely. Left cover has to come off to reach the tensioner rail screw. The rails could then be pulled out the top.
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:17 PM   #83
Bayner
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Sweet. That's more what I had in mind!
Thanks again for pioneering this process; great documentation along the way as well.
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Old 10-07-2011, 04:24 AM   #84
Dieselboy OP
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Zip tie the cam chain.


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Check and make sure this retaining pin is in place.


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Set the sector star to neutral


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Align the gears. You have it right when you can spin the output shaft.


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This picture becomes important later. That groove is the timing mark for TDC.


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The top red pointer show the gap in the bearing locating ring. Make sure it is up and not aligned with the sealing faces. The other pointer shows the locking element that must be in the notch.


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Another gap in a bearing locating ring. Must be up.


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Make sure the bearing shells are in the case bottom and lightly lube with oil.


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No pic of the application of sealant. I was a bit focused on the task at the time. It is not hard but you don’t want to screw it up. The book has a diagram I will come back and edit in.

Here's the juice.


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Seat the bottom of the crank case. You have to raise the counter balancer up and through as you lower the bottom into position. I had an extra set of hands (and eyes) because you are lowering the mating surface with sealant and don’t want to get that stuff on any of the gears or crank. [EDIT: I had an extra set of hands to help. We made several dry runs seating the case without sealant. This allowed us to choreograph our moves and made using sealant much easier.]


Reinsert the bearing stud and retaining pin.


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Torque it down.


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Next insert the output shaft seal. I’m probably going to replace this. I reused the old seal because the new one is not here. And I failed to “pack the space between the inner sealing lips of the new shaft sealing ring with grease.” Totally missed that one.


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Preping the left cover.


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Align camber as indicated by the red “T” and check the oil ports.


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Slip the selector shaft in. Return spring slides over the reamed pin. Shaft fits into the guide bushing (not shown- it’s under the shaft in the pic).


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Ensure the projection engage the selector star (it’s obvious when you are looking at it.)



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Put the spacer back on.


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You can use the special tool, but I think the tape worked fine to protect the splines.


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Lay in the gasket.


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Now seat the cover and tighten all the screws. Oddly I have no picture but more importantly I did not see a torque specification for this cover. I need to check that.


EDIT: Found the torque and sequence. My original printout did not have it. I don't know why.


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Rotate the crank to get that groove from the earlier picture aligned with the hole for the crank locking tool. Lock it back down the TDC on cylinder 1.


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Next is the swing-arm shaft cover. Prep the surfaces and insert the pressure retaining valve.


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Gasket.


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Don’t use these three holes.


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Because those three holes get filled now.


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Now put the oil pan on.


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Install the counter sprocket. 50 nm. Book calls for MP3 paste on the gear and shaft. Near as I can figure that means anti-seize. Loctite 243 the bolt.


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Flip the engine and clean the surfaces.


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Put the shims back in place.


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Install the intake cam shaft. Watch the bearing surfaces. Don’t damage any.


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Make sure the cam chain is tight to the crank gear.


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Lay in the other cam and make sure the alignment marks are in the proper place for TDC.


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Make sure the water pump gear is not bound.


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Drop in the guard rail.


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You are supposed to use new seals. I didn’t.


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Old 10-07-2011, 05:37 AM   #85
Tbone
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I don't even own a GS800 and am really enjoying the thread and impressed with your documentation efforts!
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:08 AM   #86
Dansrc51
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Thank you!
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Old 10-07-2011, 08:47 AM   #87
JRWooden
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DB:
First, THANKS for all the extra work documenting this process.
After seeing your pictures, I can not imagine doing this without a rig to hold the engine.

Second, I'm thinking about our stators burning up and wondering about the right side cover...
What are these two holes for, if you remember?

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Old 10-07-2011, 10:41 AM   #88
Dieselboy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden View Post
DB:
First, THANKS for all the extra work documenting this process.
After seeing your pictures, I can not imagine doing this without a rig to hold the engine.

Second, I'm thinking about our stators burning up and wondering about the right side cover...
What are these two holes for, if you remember?

Attachment 293127


Those are shaft guides for the gears at the bottom of this picture.


290


+1 on the engine stand. I had not made provision for one and was just planning on man handling the thing (or making a wooden jig somehow) The conversation just happened by coincidence when I found out that it might be possible to lay one on. I've tried to say "flip" every time just to catch the attention of anyone contemplating this operation.
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Old 10-07-2011, 10:45 AM   #89
Dieselboy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dansrc51 View Post


Thank you!
We'll see if the exciting part is yet to come, i.e. the starter button....





Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbone View Post
I don't even own a GS800 and am really enjoying the thread and impressed with your documentation efforts!


Welcome. And the documentation was two fold in purpose: to return to the community some of what I've gained over the years, and to slow me down. I tend to plow ahead when I have a target in sight and I wanted to be meticulous with this project.
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Old 10-07-2011, 11:08 AM   #90
Dieselboy OP
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“Apply engine oil to the friction faces for the camshafts of the bearing cap unit and install.”


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Install chain damper retainer with the chain damper. I thought it was called a guide rail. Go figure....


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Remove the locking screw again.


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At this point, you turn the engine over two slow revolutions to see if there are any issues. [EDIT: make sure the cam chain tensioner is in place BEFORE you rotate the engine. Adjust the timing as necessary.] First look through the timing hole to see the TDC mark and verify the cam sprockets are reading -EX- -IN-. I’m borrowing Larger Meister’s pic.

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Originally Posted by Lager Meister View Post

296
Turn the engine using the countershaft sprocket. (Oh, and put the shift lever back on because the engine is in neutral.) Stop if you meet any resistance. Compression? Anyone? Okay so I’m sure if you do this for a living “resistance” is a clear experience. So with some trepidation, I pushed the engine around.


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Seal the timing hole. 25nm.


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I went ahead and screwed in the spark plugs now.
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