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Old 10-07-2011, 11:24 AM   #91
JRWooden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dieselboy View Post
Those are shaft guides for the gears at the bottom of this picture.

...

+1 on the engine stand. I had not made provision for one and was just planning on man handling the thing (or making a wooden jig somehow) The conversation just happened by coincidence when I found out that it might be possible to lay one on. I've tried to say "flip" every time just to catch the attention of anyone contemplating this operation.
Thanks DB!
I wasn't thinking about the starter drive!
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:51 PM   #92
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My sealant was not viable so had to go get some more. Here’s what I’m using.


299


Here’s the first application. Just to this spot.


300


Drop in the gasket.


301



Hand tighten.



302


303


Moving on. Valve cover. Clean it well.


304


305


Second application to the gasket. I decided to reuse my original gasket and save the new one for the next valve check. I spent 30 minutes with a toothpick cleaning the surface of old sealant.


306




Engine is buttoned up. I now need another set of hands to maneuver it in to the frame.



Let’s clean.



307



Tired of waiting....Seems like no time has passed......Actually I killed three hours. So I’m moving on. Going up is tough. Going lower is more doable. I put the engine on the ground so I could remount the starter.


308


ABS pressure-modulator bracket.


309


I locate the frame bolts.



Here’s my system. The page is numbered. The bag is numbered. The bolts are tagged by location. The spacers are zipped in. I want no guess work as to where the parts go.



310


Still waiting....what does this thing weigh? Let’s see.


311


Sans fluids

312


Taping up. Put me in coach.


313


Finally the calvary arrives. First attempt we move in using the ABS modulator as the guide. Notice that the cylinders are canted slightly forward. This won’t work. The rear and the front top of the engine impact the frame.


314


Second attempt. We have the cylinders vertical. Of note the bike is also suspended. The rear is higher. The plan is to lower the back of the bike around the engine.


315


Front frame bolts go in first. Carefully align and hand thread bolts until snug. The right side has a spacer.


316



317



We are off reservation here. The book plan includes the scissor jack with mounting studs. (Conspicuously absent from the photos) But if you had that then you could lower away on the bike and have a perfect alignment.

The front bolts go in easily. slowly, I move the bike down but the jack is too high. Eventually we inch down and remove the jack and push the motor into the rear mount.


The straps provide a fractional tension to get the bolt holes exactly aligned.


318


Notice the muck on the right rear. I regret not cleaning that earlier. This was the critical bolt- last of 4. Microns off. Nudge this way. Nudge that way. Test without the spacer. Finally aligned, spacer inserted, and tightened.

319



Back around to torque. Rear mounts are 38Nm. Front are 66Nm.


On the left rear you can’t fit the socket through the frame to the bolt. Perhaps with different tools it works but standard equipment doesn’t work. Split the socket off and feed the extension through.


320


321


322


My plan is risky-- anchor the front and pivot the engine into the rear mounts. I’m not talking a free swing. All I want is the front bolts to provide alignment so I can seat the rear. But the opportunity for issues was at it’s highest due to the weight and balance involved. Stress on threads. Misaligned frames. Shifting weight. It’s mounted. I was careful. It was stressful.

If I had to do it again, or if you want a recommendation, put the bike on the centerstand and measure the height of the rear mount holes. Put the engine on the jack, cylinders vertical, and insert it into the frame at the measure height. At least this way, when the I lower the bike, I can know where to stop the jack and then insert all four bolts. [EDIT: another idea would be to use wooden dowels in the front threads to assist with alignment. Put the rear bolts in first then replace the wooden dowels. This alleviates the chance of thread damage while you are pushing the engine to get the rear holes aligned.]


I’m done for the night.
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Old 10-08-2011, 05:20 AM   #93
JRWooden
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GREAT work
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Old 10-08-2011, 06:21 AM   #94
ebrabaek
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Awesome write up..... Makes me appreciate the 1 hr job the CC takes on my DRZ......



Erling
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Old 10-08-2011, 02:18 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by ebrabaek View Post
Awesome write up.....

Erling
Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebrabaek View Post
... Makes me appreciate the 1 hr job the CC takes on my DRZ......



Erling
All of you go buy your tech a drink. They deserve it. Even without all of this picture taking and note making this job is more that 8 hours.
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Old 10-08-2011, 02:29 PM   #96
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Six frame bolts. The right side all have spacers. The left do not. On the left only the front bolt has a washer.


323


Radiator brackets

324


325



New bolt. Rear brake.


326


327


Seat the ABS Pressure Modulator.


328

Re-attach the brake lines. This entry came before the modulator in the book. I did it and had to back track to seat the modulator.


329


330

While I’m thinking about it, this needs to be torqued. 12Nm


331


Attach ground.

332


Connect oil pressure switch plug, coolant temperature sensor


333


334


Clutch cable.


335


Pull covers (rags) and position collar clamps. Seat throttle-valve assembly.

336



337




Connect both injection-valve plugs.


338


Connect pressure-sensor plug


339


Connect throttle-valve potentiometer plug.


340


Put back the zip ties. Sorry no pics but the book does provide reference.


Connect throttle cable. To the left of my thumb. I was trying to figure out what I was grabbing the assembly.


341

Connect coils.


342



Put the left foot peg back on.


343


Heat shield.


344


345


Probably missed it, but I ddin’t see any mention of the coolant lines. I want them on before the exhaust.

[EDIT: Note the tag on the positive starter wire. It wasn't necessary BUT tagging all of the wires was helpful in catching the eyes during the re-install. I could easily see there was a wire that needed a home. So the tags were more useful for just spotting a wire and not so much for what the wire was. I will definitely do this again.]


346


347


Right one first. Attach them at the top then do this side.


348



Exhaust. 14 Nm with locktite


349


A casualty.


350


I tried to resuscitate but the angles were bad for stability.


351


Meow.


352


This space is suppose to be here. If you haven’t hung out under your gas tank, you may never have noticed before. 19 Nm.


353


Start reconnecting the wires. I have to say, I tried to follow the book but failed for attachment points. They are designated but hard to decipher the pics. Good luck. Pay better attention than I did to the cuts you make on disassembly.


Start with the O2 sensor.


354


355


356

Moving on... you’ll have to figure this out. I did a really poor job of documenting the cable runs.


357

But I did tag all the ends so I got them all back together just not back where the belong (mostly).


358


359


360



Radiator.


If you cut the zip tie to remove the plug, time to put it back.

361


This was fun. There are three studs and only one bolt. Two on top and one to the bottom left. Insert it from the right.

[EDIT: I used white lithium grease to lube the studs and receivers.]


362


First reconnect the plug. Then plug in the hoses to the water pump. Then seat the top stud, bottom left and finally the bottom right screw. 5Nm BTW. I took some risk here and estimated.



363


364


Insert dirt trap. Push the back edge up as far as you can.
[EDIT: There are two tabs on top of the dirt trap that snap onto the fan housing. Make sure they seat.]


365



Affix the reservoir.


366


Put the covers back in place. Sorry no pic. First do the bolt and nut at the bottom center of the radiator screen. Then do the two screws up top.


I thought now would be a good time to put in the oil. The books says to do it on the bench. I took a vote and all of me thought that was stupid. But, lest I forget....


367


Wires to the starter.


368


Positive under the wrench. Negative at the red zip tie.


369


Install the cam shaft sensor and wire it.


370



Swing arm next.


371
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Old 10-09-2011, 04:30 AM   #97
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Cleanest that swing arm’s been since I bought this bike.


372


Shock bolt next. 100Nm. Optimoly TA? How about some anti seize?


373


Next the chain slide rail. 4Nm? Really?


374



375



Cut the brake away from its stowage on the frame and secure the brake-line cover.

376


Wheel.


377


Intake air silencer.


Connect four hoses on the underside.


Don’t forget the bolts and plug in the three plugs.


378


379


Battery is back in.


380




Now I can remove my reminder card "coolant" from on top of the ignition. I got distract when it was due. Now have the time. Book says capacity is 1.65 liters. I used the measuring cup to be sure. It only took 1.5 l.


381



Pop the radiator cap and top tot the bottom of the filler neck.


382


Open the drain hole on the water pump until there are no bubbles coming out. It poured out about 400 ml total.


383


Top the radiator and close it. Then fill the expansion tank to maximum mark and close it up.

[EDIT: if you are working with your radiator, READ THIS POST].


384



So let’s check things out.....I just spent 12 hours putting together the most complicated puzzle I’ve ever worked on and I have no idea if the thing is going to work!

385



I run back through my notes. I scan the manual. Check and double check. What have I forgotten? Pace.....look.....pray....Lets Go!


It Lives!!!!!!!!!



386



I run her briefly and listen. Nothing seems amiss. Walk and inspect and do it again. I want to see if the radiator fan will come on so run her and wait.

Smoke?


387



Turns out to be radiator fluid escaping from the upper coolant line. For the record I despise the design of that connection! It only has a lip on about 1/3 of the circumference of the pipe! No wonder we get leaks and hoses walking off.


So now I wait for the bike to cool down and reload the radiator. She only took 200 ml additional.


388


Second run is smoke free. Fan comes on. I run her for a minute and shut down the bike to check the oil. None registering? Okay I’ve not torn into an engine before is this normal? I add 500ml for a total now of 3.4 liters and get a 1/4 dip stick mark. I’m good with that for now.....besides I’m out of oil.



I put on the crash bars and hook up my add ons. She’s ready for a test ride....but that will have to wait for a dry spot in the weather and some sunlight.....


389

390
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Old 10-09-2011, 06:14 AM   #98
Motorfiets
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congrats!!! sticky please!
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Old 10-09-2011, 07:44 AM   #99
itsatdm
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I think you led us astray. You are an excellenct mechanic. Great pics on how to do it. Helped me realize it is not something I will want to tackle
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:52 AM   #100
fiwi
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I feel sick reading this thread. Honestly, I cannot believe the amount of work involved in replacing the chain. The fact that you have the nous, and the willingness to do it is beyond belief to me, seriously. Fantastic job!.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:32 PM   #101
JRWooden
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Originally Posted by Dieselboy View Post
...

Second run is smoke free. Fan comes on. I run her for a minute and shut down the bike to check the oil. None registering? Okay I’ve not torn into an engine before is this normal? I add 500ml for a total now of 3.4 liters and get a 1/4 dip stick mark. I’m good with that for now.....besides I’m out of oil.
DB:

First THANKS for doing this!

ON the oil - Yes ...I think that IS normal ... the first oil fill after the teardown tops up that little tray under the harmonic balancer arm (whatever its called). After that, future oil changes leave that much old oil in the bike... 400 - 500 ml sounda about right....

Also, If I were you I would double-check coolant ... it s hard to get all the bubbles out...
After your test ride, run your hand (carefully) across the front of the finned area of the radiator and make sure it is uniformly hot. If not you still have air in system ....

There is a thread here that I started with Joel was kind enough to offer advice on "burping" the cooling system:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=691458
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:16 PM   #102
Dieselboy OP
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DB:

First THANKS for doing this!

ON the oil - Yes ...I think that IS normal ... the first oil fill after the teardown tops up that little tray under the harmonic balancer arm (whatever its called). After that, future oil changes leave that much old oil in the bike... 400 - 500 ml sounda about right....

Also, If I were you I would double-check coolant ... it s hard to get all the bubbles out...
After your test ride, run your hand (carefully) across the front of the finned area of the radiator and make sure it is uniformly hot. If not you still have air in system ....

There is a thread here that I started with Joel was kind enough to offer advice on "burping" the cooling system:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=691458
Fantastic info! Thanks. I'm editing that back in to save someone some hassle perhaps. And then I'm going back to the garage.
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:48 PM   #103
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I feel sick reading this thread. Honestly, I cannot believe the amount of work involved in replacing the chain. The fact that you have the nous, and the willingness to do it is beyond belief to me, seriously. Fantastic job!.
Joel says the book on this job is 8 hours. I did it in 5 days. I estimate 40 hours of actual wrench time BUT that was with pictures and intentionally going very slowly. I think I could have done this in 20 hours. And yes it is a great deal of work because of all the small details. So we really need to develop a master link solution.

But the real culprit here, IMHO, is the cam chain tensioner. I don't trust it. I don't know if it is working properly. I'm going to keep my eye on it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm View Post
I think you led us astray. You are an excellenct mechanic. Great pics on how to do it. Helped me realize it is not something I will want to tackle


Thanks for the vote, I will accept a lesser accolade of excellent parts changer. I decline the nomination for mechanic because I lack the ability to diagnose and that is what makes a mechanic. Once I knew what to change, I did it. It is the "knowing" that is more impressive, I think.
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Old 10-09-2011, 04:54 PM   #104
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... Joel says the book on this job is 8 hours right............... one freaking DAY ... yeah ... not me either DB!

... But the real culprit here, IMHO, is the cam chain tensioner. I don't trust it. I don't know if it is working properly. I'm going to keep my eye on it.
If they come out with a model of this that fits our bike I may be in for one...

http://www.dragbike.com/dbnews/anmviewer.asp?a=6182&z=5

It will become another maint. item, but it really can't fail if set up correctly ...
It would also stop the cold-start slapping of the chain while oil pressure builds to the OEM tensioner ....


The old Hondas of my youth all had "manually" adjusted cam chain tensioners ... and they all worked fine!
You just had to remember do do it!

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Old 10-10-2011, 01:04 AM   #105
Dieselboy OP
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If they come out with a model of this that fits our bike I may be in for one...

http://www.dragbike.com/dbnews/anmviewer.asp?a=6182&z=5

It will become another maint. item, but it really can't fail if set up correctly ...
It would also stop the cold-start slapping of the chain while oil pressure builds to the OEM tensioner ....


The old Hondas of my youth all had "manually" adjusted cam chain tensioners ... and they all worked fine!
You just had to remember do do it!


+1

I was just discussing Honda manual tensioners.
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