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Old 02-07-2012, 09:03 PM   #76
jazzmans
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I've done the electric fan mod, used a ninja 650 fan, wired to a toggle switch on the left side cover top. I just flip it any time I come to a stop, and once rolling beyond 20mph, I turn it off. I had to move the radiator two inches further from the motor, so the ninja fan didn't rub on the cam, but that was simple to make three little two inch stand-offs.

Someday I'll modify a thermal switch to automatically turn on and off, but this has worked for two (maybe three, don't remember) years so far, and no more shattered mech fans or radiators!!!!


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Old 02-11-2012, 02:07 PM   #77
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Trouble looming?

Over the past few days, I finished the rest of the wiring, installed my freshly redone carbs, and a few other small things. Well, before going any farther with this project, I wanted to see if the bike ran.

A little bit of fresh gas, distilled water in the radiator, and I hit the starter button. My two years old BMW battery did not have enough juice to crank it (I charged it last night), so I hooked it to my car via jumper cables. (car not running, of course). She started on the second hit of the starter button, which is amazing as I did not have mufflers connected, or any gaskets in the header pipes, so there were leaks everywhere.

My right carb, despite being redone, started dripping from the overflow, so my float probably stuck, but that's an easy fix.

Bike ran smooth on and off choke, but I have this loud noise coming from behind the radiator. It sounds similar to bad starter clutch, but my starter clutch is good and was apart. I have no idea what these motors suppose to sound like, so, is there any standard noise that is not found on modern bikes? My CB (1980) sounded like that but it was due to a bad started clutch.

So, where to look first? I'm thinking about pulling the radiator off and removing the front cover by the camshaft.

FYI: Valves are good, starter clutch is good.

Thanks for any tips.
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Old 02-11-2012, 06:31 PM   #78
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Does the noise go away or get reduced with the clutch pulled in? Did you check the fan base for cracks(requires removing the fan and looking into the back area where it threads on).
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Old 02-11-2012, 08:34 PM   #79
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Originally Posted by JGBrown View Post
Does the noise go away or get reduced with the clutch pulled in? Did you check the fan base for cracks(requires removing the fan and looking into the back area where it threads on).
I do not have the clutch cable attached (yet), so I did not.

As far as the fan goes, it was fine when I had it off. I just pulled the radiator before going back online and moved the fan by hand a little. There is definitely some play in the fan (plastic blades spin about 1/4 inch before the shaft engages) which was not there before I reinstalled it. I also listened to some youtube sounds of CX running and the noise is similar. So, off with the fan and I'll be installing an electric fan before doing a second test run. I wish there was more room around the radiator, since I have to move the radiator forward to unscrew the filler cap. How the heck am I supposed to ad coolant with the bike running if I have to remove the tank to get to it. I know, an aux tank
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Old 02-12-2012, 02:55 PM   #80
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I'm an idiot !!! Yeah, I said it.

So, after messing around with an electric fan and finding a place for it, I decided to drill the mounting holes in the rad sides. Yeah, you probably know where this is going. Well, on the second hole my bit slipped and I ended up putting a nice hole through one of the tubes

Serves me well for being an idiot. I had no business to be in the garage today.
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Old 02-12-2012, 03:27 PM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
I'm an idiot !!! Yeah, I said it.

So, after messing around with an electric fan and finding a place for it, I decided to drill the mounting holes in the rad sides. Yeah, you probably know where this is going. Well, on the second hole my bit slipped and I ended up putting a nice hole through one of the tubes

Serves me well for being an idiot. I had no business being in the garage today.
Egads! Well, hopefully you can find one easily, try not to let it get you too bent out of shape.
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Old 02-13-2012, 02:13 PM   #82
jazzmans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henrymartin View Post
I'm an idiot !!! Yeah, I said it.

So, after messing around with an electric fan and finding a place for it, I decided to drill the mounting holes in the rad sides. Yeah, you probably know where this is going. Well, on the second hole my bit slipped and I ended up putting a nice hole through one of the tubes

Serves me well for being an idiot. I had no business to be in the garage today.

That sucks. I used the zip lock type external cooler mounts ricky racers use to add another radiator, it goes through your radiator to mount the fan.


made three standoffs


Allows me to open the rad cap easily with the rad and tank in place (it was a PITA before) and I made them out of

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Old 02-13-2012, 06:43 PM   #83
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Thanks for the pics. I actually fitted a fan without having to move the rad forward, but I wanted a sleek mount (invisible), so I decided to drill to the side of the rad. One hole had to be an at angle (bottom right of the rad, inside an compound curve), and I remember saying to myself that it would be a good idea to put a piece of metal over the core, just in case. Well, before I shut the drill off, the bit slipped and went through the core. It can be soldered, but I'm looking if I can find a GL650 rad with fan cheap. There are plenty of cheap rad/fan combos on ebay, but all too long to fit this bike. A VT500 fan can be had cheap, but would extend past the clutch cover.
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Old 02-17-2012, 10:02 AM   #84
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I tried soldering the down tube yesterday and it did leak with a pressure test. I may try to cut the downtube off at top and bottom and solder it solid there, as there is one another downtube that has been fixed like that by the PO. This is a triple core radiator, so the loss of two downtubes in one of the cores should not make much cooling difference.

Any tips, other than cleaning well, sanding all paint off, some flux and silver solder?
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Old 02-19-2012, 08:15 PM   #85
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Electric fan on the CX 500


Last week, after many months of uncertainty whether the bike would actually run, I gave it a try. Yes, she is incomplete, but all the vital parts are already there.
At the second push of the starter button she came alive, a little hesitant, but alive. There was, however, an awkward sound coming from behind the radiator. Mind you, I had everything apart previously and looked over the mechanical fan many, many times to make sure there were no cracks. Well, it took the few minutes of running time for the fan to start causing trouble. I guess a thirty year old plastic is not up to the job anymore.

So, after taking the radiator off again, I discovered some play in the fan. Using the front axle (spindle) as a pulley, the fan came off. Upon closer inspection, I noticed a series of small cracks in the plastic, right around the aluminum collar. This called for a modification.

Searching the net, I found that many owners replaced their mechanical fans with electric fans, mostly off a Ducati. Having no Ducati fan around, I searched through my parts bins for whatever I might have that would work, and I came up with a good use fan off my spare KLR250 (one of the few parts I had left). Some quick checking, and I came up with a suitable location to mount the fan so it would allow for radiator reinstallation, and not interfere with anything in the way. There is not a whole lot of open space between the radiator and the engine.

I started drilling in the radiator mounts to attach some brackets that would hold the fan. As i was doing that, I thought it would be a good idea to use an aluminum plate behind the area to prevent damage to the core. Thought, however, travel faster than my hands, so by the time I finish the thought, the drill bit grabbed the bracket and pulled it out of my hand, landing a nice, 6mm hole in my core.

To repair or not to repair: Unfortunately, in my area, there are no radiator shops left, so i tried soldering it myself. Armed with a handheld torch, flux, and silver solder (actually, a plumbing solder, but they call it silver for some reason), I set to work. Everything went well, until I pressure tested the core, only to find a leak in the repaired area. I needed more heat, but I was hesitant so I would not sweat (and loosened) the surrounding joints.

As I mulled the next step over, I happened to talk to a guy who not only had a spare radiator, but was willing to sell it to me. He is becoming my savior with this project, as he sold me a pair of ignition coils previously. (mine had a ripped wire)

With the new-to-me radiator in hand, I decided not to repeat my past mistake, and I brought the radiator and the brackets to a welder who lives just down the road from me. Five minutes later the brackets were on and I could proceed with the electric fan installation.

Here is the fan attached to the radiator. This is the only suitable location due to the fan's depth, especially the electric motor part. When mounted here, the motor fits next to the shaft into the cavity on right (facing forward) since the right cylinder is farther back, whereas the left cylinder is more forward.
Next, I just had to bend the top brackets (on the radiator itself, where it attaches to the frame) slightly: left side in and right side out, which shifted the radiator off center by about 1/2" or less. The bottom right mount needed some of the rubber mount removed, again to shift the radiator off center slightly. This way, there is clearance between the new electric fan and all other parts. Doing this permitted me to use all existing mounting hardware and location (I did replace the rusty spacers though). As an added bonus, removing the radiator cap has now become easier as well.

Wiring was straight forward at this point; since the fan on the KLR also pulls air, there was no need to change polarity. I used a couple of water resistant connectors, with the ground attached to one of the mounting bolts. The hot wire, for now, remains unconnected, as I have yet to decide whether to bother with a thermo switch, or just use a toggle switch mounted on the radiator cover.

And, in this crappy pic, I attempted to show how the fan sits next to the shaft which powered the mechanical fan. There is plenty of clearance.

After all this, I filled the radiator with some distilled water with a little bit of vinegar, and started the bike again. Oh my, so this is what this engine sounds like. No more nasty sounds coming from behind the radiator. Now the bike makes all the right noises.

I also checked my charging system and it holds nice and steady at 14.3 V. Things are looking good.
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Old 02-23-2012, 08:18 PM   #86
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Making progress but not having anything to show for it

I noticed a slow, but steady leak from one of the carbs overflow tube, even with the petcock shut off. Well, after taking the carbs off (what a pain) and checking, and rechecking the float levels, polishing the float needle seat, changing the float needle, and all that, the leak was still there. I finally took the magnifying glass and discovered a couple of hairline cracks in the overflow tube. Luckily for me, i have a spare set of carbs for my CB750F and the float bowls are the same After a changeover, I moved on to another things: Installed new throttle cables, clutch cable, new gaskets in exhaust (head to header, header to collector), lowered my instrument cluster by mounting it from underneath in the same location (lowers it by almost 1/2 inch), installed radiator guard, reinforced seat pan with extra three layers of fiberglass mat, glued my original grips on the new handlebar, positioned and torqued the handlebar, and messed around with the exhaust a bit in the mean time.

Which brings me to this: My original intention was to use the Duc Monster pipes I have in my garage (stock, but Remus). These pipes go on the 900, 750, and 620 bikes, IIRC, so my thought was the engine would breathe easier. Plus, I like the angle of the pipes. Well, I put them on (loose, without clamps) while I did my motor test run, and the bike was quieter than a 50cc scooter. There was almost no sound coming out of it. It was interesting to hear the pushrods though. Anyway, I decided not to use the Duc pipes. The exhaust that came with my bike is not stock, and the PO used some interesting connector pipes between the mufflers and the collector, which by itself is not a problem; however, the problem is that the mufflers mount at the lower shock bolt, right on the swingarm Now who would do that - attaching a stationary part to a moving part.
So, I mitered the connector pipes at a 15 degree angle, then had them welded together to create a 30 degree upsweep to be able to mount the mufflers at the passenger footpeg bolt. Not sure if I'll stick with those pipes yet, but at least I have the option now (If I make some brackets, since the muffler mount is about 4 inches past the footpeg bolt).
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Old 02-25-2012, 08:43 PM   #87
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Another week went by, and with the little time I have these days, progress is slow. Still, I actually have something to show for my effort.

Yesterday, I finally got my front fender and headlight bucket back from powdercoating. I've been waiting for these for a while, so having a little bit of time today, I decided to work on the front end.

First, the fender. (nothing to report, really. There is only so much that can be said about four 6mm bolts)


Then I started on the headlight bucket and wiring. This is where things got interesting. There are simply too many wires and connectors to fit inside the bucket, so after three or four tries of taking them in and out, positioning the loops in different ways, and scraping my knuckles in the tight spaces, I decided to wrap two connectors in an electrical tape and zip tie them under the ignition switch. I also zip tied the clutch cable to the instrument cluster bracket to make things a bit neater, and routed the clutch cable behind the radiator cover. (the PO had it melting on the exhaust). Inside the bucket, I left the wires necessary to run the headlight, horn, regulator connections, temp gauge connection, turn signals, etc. It is still a lot, but manageable.

As for turn signals, I went with small, single filament pieces, so I had two unused wires for the running lights which were stock on the bike. Since the old forktube sleeves/headlight mounts were beyond repair, I went ahead with simple universal mounts, and used the turn signal stems to attach the headlight bucket (both are 10mm). This is similar to what I did on my CB750 project.

Then, after testing all the connections and blowing a fuse (yeah, there was this one wire that went in the wrong hole...), I had a light. Turn signals were also tested, and worked well under load (both front and rear connected).

Attaching the light to the bucket was a chore that drove me absolutely crazy, as the powdercoating created some thickness issues and nothing fit the way it used to. It was either that, or the ring was bent when I was not in my possession, because it literally took me over an hour to get things to seat as they should. And even then it was a tight fit.
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Old 02-28-2012, 10:59 AM   #88
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Started on the seat (nothing to show for it yet, as fitting foam to the awkwardly shaped pan is a chore), and have been spending way too much time with body filler, sand paper, filler glaze, and more sand paper...then sanding it all the way down to bare glass and starting all over again. I'm not good at body work, so why the hell don't I learn and stop doing this crap!

Not feeling any love here...is it the fender ?
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Old 02-29-2012, 08:41 PM   #89
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In an earlier post Playing with fiberglass I started making my rear cowl. Since then, there was some shaping, some cutting, some sanding, and a whole bunch of messing around with various body fillers to make this thing look respectable.

I started with the cowl in its final shape, sanded with a 60 grit paper to provide for some 'bite' when applying body filler.

Next, the filler was laid. I used Evercoat Everglass as the base layer, followed by Lite Weight body filler.

After too many sanding sessions to mention (yeah, I'm not a body-repair guy), I filled the sanding marks with a glazing putty, re-sanded everything with a 400 grit paper, and shot the cowl in SEM high build primer/surfacer. It seems that no matter what I do, there are always little pinholes or fine scratches, and the SEM high build primer is the best thing I found in a rattle can. Unlike the usual suspects from Dupli, this thing dries hard, yet remains flexible. Yes, it is sitting on a heater - it's winter here.

Next I had to align everything on the bike to start messing with turn signals and the taillight. Actually, the bulk of the sanding and filling was done on the bike, not only to provide a steady platform, but also to ensure the fillers would be applied in the final shape to prevent cracking during final assembly. (notice the fine sanding dust all over the shocks). The cowl attaches via four mounting points: two 6mm bolts at the cross brace, and two 10mm bolts (in this case turn signal posts) on the sides, where the original sissy bar attached.

My initial inclination was to use a Lucas-style taillight, but that would sit on top of the cowl (like on my CB750). Since I wanted to make this bike as short as possible without modifying the frame, I decided on a smaller, LED unit that tucks away underneath the cowl, and also serves as a license plate mount. To attach this, I used a section of a plastic fender (from my scrap pile) that attaches to the stock inner fender, further eliminating stresses on the cowl. Not that there is any need, this thing has some serious layers of fiberglass mat.
The wet spots are from some last minute sanding :)
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:03 PM   #90
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Looking good!
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