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Old 10-06-2011, 04:36 PM   #91
_cy_ OP
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ARRRrrrgggg..... THREE pinched tubes later, finally got the tire mounted holding air.
cost me $40 worth of tubes, but oh well .. better to figure it out at home vs on the road in the middle of no where. two pinches were snake bytes with no way of fixing. one was a tiny pin hole that I still cannot figure how it flatted.

right when tire started getting tight, was the place that got pinched. started making sure tube was not under spoon before applying pressure.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:42 PM   #92
Airhead Wrangler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _cy_ View Post
ARRRrrrgggg..... THREE pinched tubes later, finally got the tire mounted holding air.
cost me $40 worth of tubes, but oh well .. better to figure it out at home vs on the road in the middle of no where. two pinches were snake bytes with no way of fixing. one was a tiny pin hole that I still cannot figure how it flatted.

right when tire started getting tight, was the place that got pinched. started making sure tube was not under spoon before applying pressure.
Try putting a little air in the tube before you spoon it on to give it some shape. I find that makes it much tougher to pinch.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:45 PM   #93
supershaft
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Talcum power on the tube and airing the tube up a bit and then letting the air back out, then air it up a little more, then let that air out, then a little more yet again, then pop the beads out. That helps the tube from pinching itself but it won't help you from pinching the tube.
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Old 10-06-2011, 06:05 PM   #94
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enjoying this thread CY.

Now, i'll suggest this b/c you're obviously a Tool Guy (AKA a hack ): get the Harbor Freight tire changer stand w/ motorcycle adapter

sink anchors in your shop floor if you want, or do what a lot of us do and bolt the thing to a 4'x4' square plywood footprint base. Thicker the plywood base the better

My local pals gravitate to my HF stand for all tire changes now, so be warned you might get very popular

It spoils you for real-world roadside tire changes, yes, so those skills have to be kept sharp too

Some Gurus above said talc for tire lube. In my orbit there's nothing like real tire lube: Ru-Glyde, avail in gallon jugs from NAPA around here. It is essentially dish soap without the foaming surfactants. I've used dish soap, Murphy's Oil Soap, etc and like Ru the best. I even carry a tiny shampoo bottle of Ru-Glyde with me on distance rides for trailside tire ops

Love seeing the 90S getting a new life
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Old 10-06-2011, 06:26 PM   #95
_cy_ OP
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Originally Posted by Mugwest View Post
enjoying this thread CY.

Now, i'll suggest this b/c you're obviously a Tool Guy (AKA a hack ): get the Harbor Freight tire changer stand w/ motorcycle adapter

sink anchors in your shop floor if you want, or do what a lot of us do and bolt the thing to a 4'x4' square plywood footprint base. Thicker the plywood base the better

My local pals gravitate to my HF stand for all tire changes now, so be warned you might get very popular

It spoils you for real-world roadside tire changes, yes, so those skills have to be kept sharp too
guilty as charged! "tool nut now known as a hack"

purchased HF tire changer long ago... but still in the box. could have the Honda dealer mount tire for $15. but then wouldn't have figured out first hand what not to do in the middle of no where. which hopefully I'll be heading to soon.

after watching video, started using spray dish soap, baby powder, slightly inflating tube and learned how to get valve stem started.... after all that, still pinched tube, now I make sure tube is not below spoon with every motion.
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:00 PM   #96
supershaft
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You guys can misunderstand me all you want but quotation marks make it look like you are quoting somebody. Namely me since it is me that you are going on about misunderstanding.

Three tubes in a row? I am just trying to help with my advise and my observations. Would some misunderstanding on my part help? It's getting easier to go that route. Go on and have fun though!
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:02 PM   #97
supershaft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mugwest View Post
enjoying this thread CY.

Now, i'll suggest this b/c you're obviously a Tool Guy (AKA a hack ): get the Harbor Freight tire changer stand w/ motorcycle adapter

sink anchors in your shop floor if you want, or do what a lot of us do and bolt the thing to a 4'x4' square plywood footprint base. Thicker the plywood base the better

My local pals gravitate to my HF stand for all tire changes now, so be warned you might get very popular

It spoils you for real-world roadside tire changes, yes, so those skills have to be kept sharp too

Some Gurus above said talc for tire lube. In my orbit there's nothing like real tire lube: Ru-Glyde, avail in gallon jugs from NAPA around here. It is essentially dish soap without the foaming surfactants. I've used dish soap, Murphy's Oil Soap, etc and like Ru the best. I even carry a tiny shampoo bottle of Ru-Glyde with me on distance rides for trailside tire ops

Love seeing the 90S getting a new life
Wet lube for the tube? It seems like a good way to get filthy dirty changing tires? At least that is mostly why I have never tried it.
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:29 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Wet lube for the tube? It seems like a good way to get filthy dirty changing tires? At least that is mostly why I have never tried it.
try it... you'll like it....

Baby likes me filthy-dirty but tire-change ops tube or tubeless are mess-free here with wet lube

I change a lot of tars between me and my confreres. Lube'd (and slightly inflated, say 5 psi) tubes are happier on install. And a lubed tubeless TKC can be pushed onto a GS rim by hand

It's all about the Well
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Old 10-06-2011, 09:52 PM   #99
supershaft
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Yea, I have changed a few tires myself and I have seen a lot of other mechanics change a lot too working at a few busy dealerships. I have never seen anyone use wet tube lube where I have worked or anywhere else. I still think it would be a mess. I have been snapping the first bead over the rim by hand for decades with wet and paste lubes depending on where I was working. I first saw my dad doing that at the shop when I was a kid. What is the advantage of wet lube on tubes? Besides getting dirty?
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:17 AM   #100
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It's nice you are having fun with this and it's not a big deal to spend a little more money now and again, we all screw up sometimes, but if you continue with this record for changing tires you are going to break the bank.

Do something different or go to that place that only charges $15, I think you said. I have to pay $50 to have a tire mounted and that guy won't do anything I bring in. I have to buy the tire from him.

I have a friend out in the country with a machine. I'm going over to his place sometime in the near future. I have the tire and A tube. I'm wondering if I shouldn't get 5 or 6 more tubes before I do this?

Charlie
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Old 10-07-2011, 08:13 AM   #101
_cy_ OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
It's nice you are having fun with this and it's not a big deal to spend a little more money now and again, we all screw up sometimes, but if you continue with this record for changing tires you are going to break the bank.

Do something different or go to that place that only charges $15, I think you said. I have to pay $50 to have a tire mounted and that guy won't do anything I bring in. I have to buy the tire from him.

I have a friend out in the country with a machine. I'm going over to his place sometime in the near future. I have the tire and A tube. I'm wondering if I shouldn't get 5 or 6 more tubes before I do this?

Charlie
sure didn't plan on pinching THREE tubes figuring this out. but sometimes that's the way it goes. had a HB tire machine in a box sitting here the entire time. so it's not like I didn't have an alternative.

just wanted to able to successfully mount and balance a tire on the road. part of problem I had was extra stiff side walls from mounting a 20+ year old tire. which by the way will not be on for long. A new set of Metzlers is on the parts list.

figured out a way to fab a wheel balancer for dirt cheap.

1. one 14mm steel rod (axle size), which I had laying around from a motorcycle hydraulic lift ($10)
2. two precision bearings with ID larger than rod. from my spare parts bin ($15)
3. two jack stands which almost everyone has, that work on cars

for occasional use, it's not necessary for ID of bearing to tightly fit steel rod. found out it's only necessary for rod to rest inside bearing.

jack stands, bearing and rod does have to be in perfect alignment. goal is to reduce all possible friction points. allowing wheel to freewheel showing very precise weight differences.




_cy_ screwed with this post 10-07-2011 at 08:20 AM
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Old 10-07-2011, 08:45 AM   #102
disston
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Why not use the wheel's own axle? I think you're saying it has to be level? So shim one of the jack stands. I've always paid to have my wheels balanced because I paid to have the tires mounted anyway. Now that I'm going to go over to my friends house to mount a tire I'm going to try the Dyna Bead balancing method. Some don't like this method but I'm going to give it a shot.

Charlie
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Old 10-07-2011, 08:51 AM   #103
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I tried Dyna beads on my racebike and am thrilled with the results. My last outing I was going faster and had far less cupping in my wear patterns.
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Old 10-07-2011, 10:07 AM   #104
_cy_ OP
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Originally Posted by disston View Post
Why not use the wheel's own axle? I think you're saying it has to be level? So shim one of the jack stands. I've always paid to have my wheels balanced because I paid to have the tires mounted anyway. Now that I'm going to go over to my friends house to mount a tire I'm going to try the Dyna Bead balancing method. Some don't like this method but I'm going to give it a shot. Charlie
you could use wheel's axle, but you need to find two different size bearing. it'd be a bit harder to align, but not a big deal. if you've got two bearings on hand correct size, then that's the way to go.

pictures above showed the easiest way to job done with material on hand for me... best of all it was FREE. will purchase correct size bearings, then lathe out bearing holders out of aluminum to make a proper tool later. or you can purchase the real tool for $40 at HB....http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcy...and-98488.html

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Old 10-07-2011, 10:11 PM   #105
_cy_ OP
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it's brake master cylinder time... what an unusual layout with BMC under the tank
those Germans must have stayed up late to come up with this one.

didn't want to order a BMC kit until I could inspect bore for pits too deep to hone out.
looks like I lucked out, bore is in pretty good condition. can't same the same for my poor frame.
brake fluid destroys the paint. what a mess underneath.

bleed off port was completely plugged, not allowing brake fluid to flow back releasing calipers.
hence why front brakes was locking up.

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