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Old 10-12-2011, 05:37 PM   #16
Wirespokes
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Doesn't hurt to pull the starter apart for clean/lube. Most guys just leave them till they fail (years and years).

The 81 R65 was the only year that came standardly with dual discs. My first R65 was an 81 and it was an excellent bike - never should have sold it!

It was a good thing a PO pulled the air induction system - tended to overheat exh valves and warp heads. Not a good thing!
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:42 PM   #17
supershaft
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I don't think the air pump crap over heats the valve or warps the head itself but I think they do tend to warp the exhaust seat boss but that isn't an issue until you replace the exhaust seat and they do warp plenty without the pump too. Just not as much I think.

I take the crap off because it makes the bike lighter and easier to work on. I think the engine breathes a little easier too but you do have to do something with the crank breather or you end up with the before pictured mess just like I always warn about.
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Old 10-16-2011, 11:01 AM   #18
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Update!

First off, I have to say just amazed I am at how EASY this bike is to work on. My brief venture into fixing up a basketcase 1976 Honda Goldwing was much different. Granted, it hadn't run in who knows how many years, while my r65 has only been down for one but still... I've got to appreciate the simplicity and great design of this machine.

So anyway, spent Saturday morning tearing the r65 down. One hangup I had was that I couldn't get the swingarm back far enough to slip a piece of wood in to hold it. The custom saddlebags were interfering so I ended up removing the entire rear end. Good anyway as I want to re-grease the final drive splines. Transmission came out quite easily!


And it confirmed my suspicion. The input splines were stripped. While obviously ruined on the transmissison side, they were better than I thought. They actually stripped out on one side more than the other.


But the clutch was shredded smooth. Too bad, as the clutch measured well within it's specs... still had a lot of life left in it.


And lots of grit:


Other clutch pieces were in good shape, though obviously streaked with lots of grease/oil. Not sure if I can reuse them. I might just buy everything new.


Now the potentially bad part. When I removed the flywheel, the teeth on the BACK side (engine facing side) had been chewed up. I can't find where it was rubbing but it was obviously rubbing, and fresh, as the metal was bright. However, the damage wasn't even all the way 'round the flywheel. It was worse on one side. Bolts were snug, as they should be and I could detect no movement when it was mounted. Have any of you seen this type of damage?


Finally, I removed the oil pump housing cover and noticed that there were rub marks on the inside. Is this normal? (This is after I removed the old, squared-off O-ring and cleaned it.


Also dropped the oil pan and scrubbed it clean. There were a few pieces of something in the bottom of the pan. Not metal... slivers of plastic, I'd say. Four or five, about 1/4" long and brittle. They crumbled when I rolled them in my fingers. Thoughts?

So, it's obvious I'm going to have to buy an entire new clutch assembly. I know about putting everything 120 degrees apart due to weight fluctuations. BUT ... will the new pieces I buy be marked on the heavy side so I know? Otherwise, how the heck do I find out where the heavy side is of each piece? (Or is it REALLY that important ... ?)
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Old 10-16-2011, 12:44 PM   #19
Houseoffubar
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The marks on the flywheel, I believe, is caused by the starter engaging it. if it is not too bad, you should be fine.
I would say the same about the oil pump (no not the starter engaging it) The flat surfaces of the pump will wear a bit, and any grit, or debris will wear marks, and grooves into it.
I don't know how sensitive Airheads are to oil pump wear, so I will leave it to others to say if this should be replaced, but the wear looks normal to oil pumps I have seen in other motors.
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Old 10-16-2011, 03:00 PM   #20
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That pump cover looks kinda rough from what I usually see. I would measure it. I have only found one worn out pump. It was worn out from a bunch of chips left in the engine after repairing top cylinder stud threads. That whole engine was worn out toast.

Put a straight edge across the pressure and cover plates. The inside ID of the plate always warps out a bit. More than just a bit and you need new plates. Always replace the spring.
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Old 10-16-2011, 03:34 PM   #21
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Both the pressure plate and pressure ring seemed to measure level and fine across multiple areas. Nice and flat all the way around.

When you say "measure the oil pump cover" what exactly do you mean? Measure what? I can definitely feel the worn areas with my fingernail so I might just replace the cover. As long as just replacing it is fine... is there some measurement with the oil pump itself that I have to do?

After looking at the teeth of the flywheel, I came to that conclusion as well... it has to be from the starter teeth. They look fine as far as I can tell, but I should probably remove the starter and clean/re-grease it. Is there any way to remove the starter without having to remove the front cover area? I've already got the crank blocked and I suppose I'd have to wait until the new transmission is back in before I unblock the crank and remove the starter.
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Old 10-16-2011, 04:06 PM   #22
supershaft
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The pump covers are cheap and an important part of being able to build pressure. I would replace it. I meant measure the pump. I mainly just go by how they look. The lobes should be almost perfect. If they are marked up much, put a new pump in. Of course, I would look around for the source of the whatever it is scaring up your engine.
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Old 10-16-2011, 05:09 PM   #23
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Yep, new oil pump cover already ordered along with my other goodies. I'll take a closer look at the lobes but at a glance, they look just fine.
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:07 PM   #24
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Big update! I was thwarted by the transmission neutral switch/ground wiring loom and couldn't finish as much as I wanted to last weekend. As I was putting the new transmission back in, I noticed the neutral switch wires were twisted and nicked, and one just broke off in my hand. So I had to order a new one and wait for it to come in.

This is what I got down last weekend....

Setting the seal depth:


Pulling the old seal out. I noticed that the "old" seal is the exact same type as the new seal I purchased, so it had been redone in the past.


More evidence it had been done in the past. A previous owner nicked the inside face a bit removing the old seal. It was definitely noticeable and I wasn't confident I could do a nice job adding some metal repair putty stuff. So I sanded it very gently with a high-grain sandpaper until I could barely feel it. Hope that is good enough.


New main seal seated:



New oil pump cover, guide ring O-ring, and main seal in place. I had a bit of a problem with the lower right oil pump cover bolt. The threads at the very edge of the hole were damaged/cross-threaded and I couldn't get any bolt to start correctly. It would catch and immediately angle slightly. I didn't want to damage the threads so I bought a thread tap and gently screwed it in. Worked like a charm!


New friction plate and spring:


And I didn't take any photos but I got the clutch assembly together, used the alignment tool (glad I had that!) and got it all together. I didn't actually have a hex bolt fitting for my torque wrench so I just tightened them down by hand to what I thought was about 10lbs of torque.
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:12 PM   #25
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And a very successful day today working on the r65! New transmission installed and filled with fresh gear oil, oil change, new oil pan gasket, final drive cleaned/greased/installed, rear brake cleaned and reinstalled, airbox, battery and seat installed. Sorry for the crappy pics. My small digi-camera I use for such projects died, and all I had to use was my iphone.

White crayon on the timing marks. The OT was only partially punched so only part of the T and the alignment line above it were deep enough to hold any crayon.


New transmission splines greased with Honda Moly60, and prepared to get mated up with the new clutch.


Old airbox breather vent (right) and new (left):


Mmmm.... new transmission. New oil breather hose, and neutral switch wiring loom.


BEFORE. The r65 had a really terrible rear brake... barely even slowed the bike, let alone stop it. I think a previous owner (hopefully not my FIL) used the wrong spline grease, and it got flung everywhere, soaking into the brake pads, etc.


AFTER a good cleaning of the brake drum. Also lightly scuffed the drum surface with sandpaper. Also took the time to clean the wheel and spokes. Ugh, that was tedious.


Final drive with good splines and very dirty, contaminated brake shoes. The pads were dark and REALLY glazed over.


After a good cleaning. Degreased the brake shoes and scuffed them up a bit with sandpaper. Honda moly60 applied.


Torquing down the driveshaft bolts to the transmission output, with blue locktite, and NEW bolts, of course. The brake felt SO much better and I could actually lock the rear wheel with the pedal. I couldn't do that before because of the brake shoes.


Not much space in there. The special tool I purchased just for this purpose was WELL worth it!


"New" transmission shifted okay, but I drained the old fluid (was nice and clean) and the drain bolt showed no significant buildup of metal shavings. Only found a couple small slivers. When reinstalling the shifter and footrest, I did notice that the gear shifter input seal MIGHT be slightly weeping gear oil. Will keep an eye on it.


She's almost ready to roll! It was such a nice feeling to be able to shift smoothly through the gears and see the rear wheel turn!



Tomorrow I'm up early and hope to get the rest done: Strip/repaint valve covers, new stainless brake lines up front, and carb(s) rebuilt.
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:18 PM   #26
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Looks great! I dig the seat!
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:16 PM   #27
supershaft
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Just like I always point out: That crank breather will make a mess. Some people actually reconnect the hose to the airbox without the rest of the crank breather crap and that eventually makes a giant mess as well. All that oil would eventually had your clutch slipping. You need to run that vent to a tank, out the back, or get the stock setup replaced.
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Old 11-14-2011, 09:23 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Just like I always point out: That crank breather will make a mess. Some people actually reconnect the hose to the airbox without the rest of the crank breather crap and that eventually makes a giant mess as well. All that oil would eventually had your clutch slipping. You need to run that vent to a tank, out the back, or get the stock setup replaced.
Well it's all buttoned back up, with the crank breather properly attached back into the airbox. I purchased a new airbox vent valve so hopefully that will help a bit. But I see your point in venting it externally. Two weeks without an update, but now she's all ready to ride! Last weekend I rebuilt the carbs. What first greeted me... a nicely stripped screw which I bunged up even worse. Managed to get it removed through lots of PB Blaster, drilling, and hammering with a hardened slot screwdriver. It made enough of a notch that I could get a bite.


And just to refresh your memory. Before:


After:


While I wasn't able to get out and ride yesterday due to mother nature deciding we needed rain ALL DAY. In a place that averages 360 days of sunshine, I was frustrated that I wasn't able to go for a break-in ride. But on the other hand, I was glad to see our parched desert get a much-needed soaking. We gotta water all those golf courses, right?

So to the sound of rain pattering on the garage roof, I removed, stripped, cleaned, and repainted the valve covers and installed new brake lines, then bled. With new valve cover gaskets, I hope to solve the annoying slow drip from both sides.


After, but before I sanded the horizontal fins:. I'm sure my neighbors didn't appreciate hearing the buzz of my electric sander at 7 in the morning.


And I got to my first brake bleeding job EVER. It wasn't quite as frustrating as I thought it would be, though there were a time or two when I ground my teeth. I purchased a couple speed bleeders to help with the process.

First off, the system was NASTY. I'm scared in hindsight just thinking about me riding last year with the brakes that looked this bad. I first bled the left caliper and there was so much muck in the system that as I pumped new fluid in, it just pushed the nasty stuff up into the master cylinder. Brown fluid with bits of rubber lining. It took quite a few flushes to get it all out. Additionally, I think there was something wrong with the left-side speed bleeder, as it didn't behave as normal. I thought "aren't these supposed to make the process easier?" But it simply wouldn't work well. I actually had to use it like a traditional bleeder and tighten/loosen by hand between pumping. But eventually I got it bled. Thankfully, the right caliper bled like a dream! It literally took 5-minutes with the speed bleeder.

But I think I got it, and the feel on the lever is nice and firm. A world of difference. Makes sense considering this is what came out:


Thanks to all of you with your advice and patience as I worked my way through this, which I know is "old hat" to many of you. I learned a lot about the bike, and now am nowhere NEAR as intimidated about it. I have no fear about working on it now.

I will save my Vapor digital speedo/dashboard install for a later date. My intent was to get her back on the road. And just in time, as tomorrow (11/15/2012) will be the two-year anniversary of my father-in-law's passing. (Most of you don't know that I inherited this bike from him when he passed. I rode it for a year until the splines stripped.) I'm going to ride the bike to work in his memory tomorrow. I think he'd be proud of what I accomplished. RIP John.

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Old 11-15-2011, 05:43 PM   #29
Ben Carufel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azcycle View Post
Well it's all buttoned back up, with the crank breather properly attached back into the airbox. I purchased a new airbox vent valve so hopefully that will help a bit. But I see your point in venting it externally. Two weeks without an update, but now she's all ready to ride! Last weekend I rebuilt the carbs. What first greeted me... a nicely stripped screw which I bunged up even worse. Managed to get it removed through lots of PB Blaster, drilling, and hammering with a hardened slot screwdriver. It made enough of a notch that I could get a bite.


While I wasn't able to get out and ride yesterday due to mother nature deciding we needed rain ALL DAY. In a place that averages 360 days of sunshine, I was frustrated that I wasn't able to go for a break-in ride. But on the other hand, I was glad to see our parched desert get a much-needed soaking. We gotta water all those golf courses, right?

So to the sound of rain pattering on the garage roof, I removed, stripped, cleaned, and repainted the valve covers and installed new brake lines, then bled. With new valve cover gaskets, I hope to solve the annoying slow drip from both sides.

After, but before I sanded the horizontal fins:. I'm sure my neighbors didn't appreciate hearing the buzz of my electric sander at 7 in the morning.

And I got to my first brake bleeding job EVER. It wasn't quite as frustrating as I thought it would be, though there were a time or two when I ground my teeth. I purchased a couple speed bleeders to help with the process.

First off, the system was NASTY. I'm scared in hindsight just thinking about me riding last year with the brakes that looked this bad. I first bled the left caliper and there was so much muck in the system that as I pumped new fluid in, it just pushed the nasty stuff up into the master cylinder. Brown fluid with bits of rubber lining. It took quite a few flushes to get it all out. Additionally, I think there was something wrong with the left-side speed bleeder, as it didn't behave as normal. I thought "aren't these supposed to make the process easier?" But it simply wouldn't work well. I actually had to use it like a traditional bleeder and tighten/loosen by hand between pumping. But eventually I got it bled. Thankfully, the right caliper bled like a dream! It literally took 5-minutes with the speed bleeder.

But I think I got it, and the feel on the lever is nice and firm. A world of difference. Makes sense considering this is what came out:

Thanks to all of you with your advice and patience as I worked my way through this, which I know is "old hat" to many of you. I learned a lot about the bike, and now am nowhere NEAR as intimidated about it. I have no fear about working on it now.

I will save my Vapor digital speedo/dashboard install for a later date. My intent was to get her back on the road. And just in time, as tomorrow (11/15/2012) will be the two-year anniversary of my father-in-law's passing. (Most of you don't know that I inherited this bike from him when he passed. I rode it for a year until the splines stripped.) I'm going to ride the bike to work in his memory tomorrow. I think he'd be proud of what I accomplished. RIP John.

That's too cool. Did you ride to work today? How was it?
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Old 11-16-2011, 05:13 AM   #30
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Hope you had a nice ride yesterday. FYI, if you still have a leak at the valve cover, look at these: valve gasket.
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