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Old 10-09-2011, 09:24 PM   #16
Cpt. Ron OP
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Location: Sacramento, CA
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Last year, the large tank on the XR was quite an advantage. We had multiple gas stops available and planning became a key to the strategy. Today, there was one stop on the course, and that was provided by the support crew. I stop to add some fuel and take the time to partially refill my drinking bladder. I also take some seconds to eat most of a granola bar. Though Iím quick with my stop, I donít gain a position on Megan who left soon after I arrived. Before my departure, Henrik screams into the pit. I snarkily remark that he may want to strap one of the fuel cans to his back before I leave in a cloud of dust.

The run north on the highway is a drone to say the least. I keep my speeds in the legal range, at least until I hit the dirt again. Once in the dirt, I finally open up the XR for what sheís worth. Iím getting fired up about catching Megan and keeping Henrik behind me as long as possible. Why I didnít do this earlier is beyond meÖ.



These are fast roads, and the miles disappear quickly. We turn north towards Currant, NV. Again, the road is fast and smooth. Just a few zigs and zags and some disbursed ruts and bumps to keep your attention. But otherwise, this is fast desert running. Zoom out the gps to a couple of miles to see the general route and major upcoming turns. Lean forward and twist itÖ.



After the quick right turn in Currant, itís back towards the mountains again. Iím on a roll and really making time.



In the hills, I start encountering dust. Either itís just hanging due to the lack of breezes in the hills or Iím catching someone. Amazingly and to my surprise, Iím catching someone. Learning my lesson from earlier, I keep track of the gps to see if I can capitalize on a nav error. At a minimum, maybe I can pull off a sneaky maneuver at a direction change, where they stop to verify the correct route. My timing couldnít be more perfect as I catch Megan as she slows to verify the left turn up into the steeper hills. With her slowing, the dust is minimal and the pass is completed safely and easily. The funny thing is that within a mile, Iím off the course following the gps breadcrumbs instead of looking at the big picture of the general course direction. And yes, I handed the position back to Megan. To my credit, she did compliment me on my speed through the roughÖ.As much as I tried, I just couldnít find an easy and safe way to pass for the next 15-20 miles. Her pace was quick, the dust thick, and the course just didnít have a flow that allowed passing here. There were twists and turns at unexpected times, with signs of many previous riders nearly or completely missing some of the blind turns. I decided in my best interest to just bide my time and follow her dust for a whileÖ




At a right hand turn towards Lund, Megan finally makes a nav error I can capitalize on. I make the turn before sheís able to get back on the correct track in front of me. I twist it all the way to give her a little taste of some dust. Damn that was a good run, thanks Megan!
From here to the checkpoint at Highway 6, I donít see a familiar face. The support staff inform me to take it easy for a couple of miles northward until out of the ranch areas. The course is easy and smooth, so time is easy to make once the ranchettes are behind me. This is lonely riding out here. Nobody in sight, and not much to see. That is, until we start the climb up to Treasure City and Hamilton. This is high country mining from the old days. I canít imagine living here year-round back in the day. This is country near-or-above the timber line. Oh yeah, remote, too. The course for us is steep, tight and twisty. I canít find a groove on the BRP, I just trudge my way up the mountain. Some of the views and sights are worth the effort, though.




Itís not until the end of this section where I finally see a dust cloud approaching from behind. Henrik pulled a trick from my book and waited until a dust-free section to motor pastÖ.Highway 50. We cruise at semi-legal speeds, but once back off the asphalt at the farm, Henrik checks outÖ.



My water is gone again, I have an upset stomach and Iím tired. I know Iím close to the end, just need to cross those mountains in front of me. Just ride smart and get there. Thereís a lot more riding that needs to be done in the next several days. Amazingly, in the mountains, I catch Henrik. And itís not because of his fuel consumption. Baja Joe picked the wrong time to sightsee and ride at the same time and went off the course. By the time I arrived, Henrik had already halfway muscled the bike back on the road. Of course, I snapped a pic before jumping in to helpÖ.



With his bell slightly rung, Joe takes his time getting back in the saddle. Henrik splits before his fuel has a chance to evaporate from his float bowl, and I just motor on trying to finish. One of the final stretches along the mine road are sketchy as hell, like riding on ball bearings. Later, Megan mentions how much easier it was to ride in the gully next to the roadÖlesson learned. The finish was almost anti-climatic. It just ended. No victory jumps, no champagne showers, no podium. But our comrades were there with cervezas and cheer. Good enough for me. After imbibing a beer, I snag some water to take my meds and ponder my gut. My body wants to revolt, but my mind wants to rejoice. Another successful leg of a KOTW under my belt. One thing is for sure, though. The competition is definitely a step above last year. Forget placement. If the course is going to be like this the rest of the rally, I'll be happy to finish in one piece and in daylight.

Fuck you Rob!
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"I don't know what you do, but I know what I do, and I don't do that." --Uncle Doug, R.I.P.
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:14 AM   #17
mxbundy
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Yeah,
That mine road was a SOB!! But the ride through the forrest before it was EPIC!

OH yeah.......F YOU ROB!!!!!

Bundy
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Old 10-10-2011, 11:22 AM   #18
Baja Ho
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Nice, looks like fun. Thanks for posting.
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:18 PM   #19
notmybikemodelname
KOTW is a myth!
 
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Location: I'm in jail Dad, and I like it here.............
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If this event actually took place and if it was a race, the results would look like this.

DNF's are treated as start time + last finisher for the day + one hour.


notmybikemodelname screwed with this post 10-10-2011 at 02:40 PM
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Old 10-10-2011, 03:32 PM   #20
notmybikemodelname
KOTW is a myth!
 
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PROLOGUE:

Here’s my take on this year’s event.

When I first came up with this idea while drunk on December 19th, 2009, my goal was to do this once and have it out of my system. As with any thing bad for you, that involves risks, danger, the unknown and the chance that everything could go to shit, there’s no possibility of doing it once and only once. It’s like getting a tattoo, One is too many and two is not enough.

So I posted up:

Quote:
Originally Posted by notmybikemodelname View Post
It's barely been three weeks since the first KotW ended and I can't help myself. I'm already planning THE REMIX for next year.



Here's what I can tell you:
  • Somewhere in Cali and at least two other states.
  • There will be no entry fee, but you must be a member in good standing with Club KotW. Club KotW's only purpose is to promote long distance motorcycle riding in the spirit of the original KotW.
  • Club KotW will only allow 50 "rider" members and 20 "support steward" members for the 2011 year. We curently have 35 original "rider" members and 10 original "support steward members"
  • It will take place in the late Spring/early Summer
  • It will once again be a pure GPS navigation "self guided" ride.
  • You get the following with your fully paid membership:
    • The privilege to ride in all of the KotW events for the whole year, but there will only be one
    • All GPS tracks in order to self guide your ride using our starter system on a predetermined day and time.
    • Free KOTW schwag including Jersey, t-shirts, stickers and discounts with our CLUB KotW sponsors.
    • All of your meals are free during the event with your club membership
    • The transporting of your gear, including tools, spare rims and tires from one daily stop to another for no additional charge.
    • Free hotel/motel stays during the ride.
    • Free and full support from the "support stewards" during the event.
    • SPOT tracking and online support during the whole event from our "based" and "mobile" spotters.
    • And more with your fully paid membership.
So, we have very few memberships available and I belive that they will go fast.


Club KotW memebership dues are yet to be determined and will be communicated on a need to know basis after we have reviewed your application. Club KotW will be a non-profit organization.

To be considered for a "rider" or "support steward" membership, please contact kingsofthewestrally@gmail.com
We will send you a membership application for you to fill out and return.

Thanks,

and,

Viva la KotW!

Fast forward to October 18th, 2010, only 15 days after the end of what was to be the only event known as the KotW to ever be run. I felt like a criminal returning to the scene of the crime to see what else I could steal. But………not until I had buy-in from my trusted group of cronies. Jim W, Jim J, Keith, Gary and Matt. Oh Shit! They are all in. Now I must move forward.


Over a two to three month period we had many people contact us who wanted IN. We sifted through over 150 applications and narrowed it down to 40 people who we felt fit our criteria for this event. What was our criteria you may ask? Who were we looking for? Our perfect candidate is a cross between Steve McQueen (the racer side, not the actor), Eric Cartman, and Butch Cassidy. We needed people who still had that desire to ride 300+ miles of dirt, rocks, sand, silt, trees and ravines all in one day, day after day, while riding their bike like they stole it and laughing like a maniac no matter what come their way, AND just for bragging rights. This doesn’t exist anymore, but for a very select group of psychos, who for some unknown reason, I seem to be able to attract.

Fast forward again through the following months of planning that ensued and stop at the end of May, 2011. As Jim W and I are driving/riding and searching for some of the most killer terrain imaginable in the western states, it suddenly occurs to us that the route we want to take can only partially be ridden due to the heaviest snow fall that the west has seen in over forty-years.




With a heavy heart and some consternation, we decide to postpone the event until late September. Unfortunately, this did not work out for everyone as it’s not so simple to just take a week off to go fuck around in the dirt with your friends.

Another fast forward here to June 15th, 2011. I like to drink when I ride, and I like to ride when I drink. Sometimes……………………….I drink too much! Much too much for riding.




Oh Shit, how in the fuck can I finish the course now and get all of the planning done. It became very obvious to me that I was going to have to go into disaster mode here and I needed some riding/planning help. Enter, Jim W. (Herrhelemet), my trusty cohort in everything wrong and that could end in divorce, jail, losing lots of money, etc, etc. He’s always game if risk is involved. So I go into overdrive and pull out my tracks from KotW 2010. I spend weeks surveying some of my previous solo exploring and doing some more GE exploring. Over time, I put together a route which I believe will be very challenging for most any size bike. Now I ask Jim to ride all of the Utah route that I had not been able to lay tracks on myself. He does this one weekend while we stay in constant contact via cell phone and text. When he gets stuck, I quickly jump onto GE and plan his route out or around and send him off again.

This alone was not enough. The Friday before the event began, I had some worries about how close our course was going to intrude onto the Area 51 complex and was having nightmares of riders being chased down by black helicopters (Hmmm, didn’t this happen anwyays). So Jim and I loaded up his bike and drove out at 10pm on Thursday night to about 30 miles west of Caliente, Nevada. I had already uploaded the sections of about 120 miles into Jim’s GPS and I sent him on his way, telling him I would meet him at the next point where the course crossed the 375. It took about 3 hours before I saw his dust trail. We regrouped and discussed what he had just ridden and signed off on it. We then go down the hwy about another 3-4miles and I point him into the wilderness heading straight into the Area 51 complex, but be sure to tell him not to worry and that they’ll stop you before they shoot at you (so I had heard).

About three hours later, after I had gone into Tonopah for some beer and burgers and as I was sitting off the hwy on a dirt road that was directly on the planned course, Jim pulls up and gives me another thumbs up for addition to The REMIX.

Planning is done, lodging is complete, dining plans are a go.

Now we can just sit back and relax and see everyone in Tonopah.

Except for:

  • Getting everyone to enter their SPOTS in Spotwalla
  • Compiling the emergency contact lists
  • Completing our checkpoint sheets
  • Renting a trailer
  • Tracking down our satellite communications gear
  • Hoping our custom jerseys were really on the way from the garment maker in China
  • Meeting with Mr Murphy to try and appease him and work out a deal for next few weeks
  • Check in with all of the support personnel and be sure they were still on board
  • Try to find where our photographer was and be sure he was still on board
  • Buying a shitload of beer and other types of booze
  • Transferring money to my debit cards
  • Filing travel plans with my banks so that they wouldn’t freeze my cards when saw a crap load of charges in other states (this still happened)
  • Etc
  • Etc
  • Etc
  • Etc
  • Etc
More to come.................................

notmybikemodelname screwed with this post 10-10-2011 at 03:58 PM
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Old 10-10-2011, 09:38 PM   #21
bump
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Great Storytelling Ron

As usual your story telling shines.

Thanks for the effort.

Hope you're feeling better in the gut now. Saw the symptoms on the May Clinic site. YIKES!
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Old 10-12-2011, 10:07 PM   #22
airborndad
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Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Montclair Ca.
Oddometer: 2,476
photofuckit sent me a note saying I have reached my limit if I post any more all of my pictures will not show so I'll have to wait until the 21st (I think) to post pictures of day 3 rest day and days 4 & 5 ride days
so stay tune for some more good pictures
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:49 PM   #23
Cpt. Ron OP
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Location: Sacramento, CA
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Day 2







Pucker and I start together again and slowly make our way out of town. The highway burn passes slowly as we maintain posted limit, but we slowly increase the speed once off the pavement. Itís still several miles of wide, graded dirt road. We ride side-by-side to avoid eating each otherís dust. Alas, lastplace isnít up for such niceties, and blows past us at full tilt. As much as I want to chase him down, I refrain and just let my day be my day.




I miss the first real dirt turn, but Pucker doesnít. I turn around for the short run and see that at least one other rider has beat me to it. There isnít much of a track here, and some people are wandering around while reading their gpsí. I recall this section from my computer research, so I soldier on through and around the scrub brush and small trees to the gate. After opening the gate, I turn to find my bike on itís side due to the soft ground. Just what I need. As I struggle to get it uprighted quickly, more riders arrive. I grudgingly wave them through as I fight gravity. We motor along again, and come to a Y in the trail. I instinctively follow the dust to the right, but quickly realize the mistake. I turn into the scrub brush to turn around before tipping overÖ.againÖ.As I wallow in the brush and sand, Megan passes by without seeing me. Sweating and swearing now, I pick the bike upÖ.again. I return to the real course and start making some time. Itís rolling two track again with trees obstructing the corners, mostly second and third gear running. With the other riders off in the wrong direction, I donít have dust to deal with.

Coming around a corner, I find a bike off the course and two riders standing there. Wally has run off the course, Baja Joe is looking around in the dirt. From the look of things, Wallyís bike lost the crankcase plug a while back and was blowing oil. When he tip-ovahed, he lost some more. It was probably a good thing, actually. He may have kept going until the motor lost oil and really done some damage. Meanwhile, other riders start showing up, mainly the ones I saw that got mis-directed after my tip-ovah at the gate. I convince the others to take off as Tim and I assist Wally with his predicament. No need for a bunch of us to stand around wasting time and then sucking dust together once back on the road.








A stick, some duct tape and safety wire, and heís good to go. Also some spare oil donated by somebody who left previously. Not the prettiest thing, but it beats the crash rig or walking.





Hey, Wally, you wanna learn a neat trick?




Now, now, where were we? Oh thatís right, a non-event across the desert that isnít timed or anything. Iím now third from last and have only gone like 20 miles or so. Crap itís going to be a long day. The nice thing is that I have clean air in front of me and plenty of tire tracks to help find the way and remind me of upcoming turns. I continue on this rough two-track until we come out on a nice graded road that follows a narrow river valley. The same one we were on before all of this navigation and mechanical stuff happened. Top gear and twist it, I say. The front wheel fights gravity over the tops of the hills, the rear fights for traction on corner exits. Sometimes, they both vie for elusive friction during hot corner entries. As Charlie would say, ďFun, fun!Ē Soon enough, the run has to end. Itís a sharp right turn through a gate into a pasture with really tall grass. I putt through this stuff while watching the gps, no need to auger into a hidden hole. Across the other side and the trail starts up a hill. I get on the gas only to find that Iím rapidly approaching another gate. Downshifts and brakes arenít enough to prevent from ramming into the barbed wire. Shaking my head, I roll backwards and proceed to open it. No sign of tire puncture, so I roll on, verbally abusing myself for letting something like that happen.

The two track continues with some funky zig-zags of fencing and gates to cross through Haggerty Ranch. We continue southward on some quicker two-track before I turn east onto a smoother road. Up ahead, I see dust from a pickup going my direction. The first dust Iíve had to deal with for quite some time. Before I can catch him though, I come to Puckerís crash site. Jamin and Jeff are still there, informing me that Brian had just left in the truck I saw. This is a real bummer. With nothing to help with, I continue up to the checkpoint where Duane is standing by. I turn right and head for the open desert.

This section of trail got old real quick. Narrow, rutted two track that the bike just didnít want to track right. I tried it in the rough next to the course, but that was worse. I resigned myself to just get through this by zooming out on the gps to see where in the hell I turn off of this stuff. Itís late morning now, and the temps are rising. I drink some more water and slog through the ruts. This valley is covered by sage that is apparently harvested from time to time. Turn east across the valley then south again on a smoother road. This continues for several miles as the sun continues itís climb along with the temperature.



One thing I can say is that Iím riding a decent pace without risking too much. I donít stop of course, but for a while I feel like Iím at least doing OK. But as the miles drone on and the landscape opens up, I start to feel very alone. I havenít seen a comrade since Puckerís crash scene, and no sign of dust in front or behind me. It gets even more strange when Iím trying to find another one of Robís sneaky turns off a nicely graded dirt road. There are construction trucks everywhere working on a powerline or something, and Iím circling around looking for a hare trail through the brush. I see the marks of previous lost riders, so I know Iím in the right place. Some bushwhacking and gps wandering and soon enough I find the trail. This is a short run of rough stuff before landing on another decent graded road, if not a bit roller-coaster like. This demands some speed control so the bike doesnít g-out in the troughs or loop over at the crests.

Finally, I see the faint hint of dust up ahead just cresting a hill. This is the motivation I need at this time. Soon enough, my bike is topped out for a couple of miles of smooth straight roads, slowing only to jump over a cross road (Sunnyside Road) just in front of a big rig.





At the spot where I last spotted a dust cloud, there is a funky corral and tire marks everywhere. With my gps zoomed out, I see the general direction Rob intended and fight my way through some brush to parallel the fence and continue southward. The course is again rougher, but I gain sight of the dust again and hammer on. The course turns right on a smoother road and I wick it up again. The dust closes in. Looking for a changes in the course where I can capitalize on little dust, I see some turns coming up. The course turns east across a dry lake and the dust really gets thick, but Iím still closing thanks to the wind blowing across the path. Amazingly in my luck, I catch SteveO at a gate crossing in the middle of the dust-filled dry lake. He waves me through and I take off again eastward. The trail is gone and this is rough going once more. Knowing someone is breathing down my neck now, I hammer on and never look back. Pioche here I comeÖ



The supposed checkpoint is empty save for an abandoned U-haul trailer. If passerbys only knew how much crap was stuffed in that thingÖ..I roll into the gas stop for mandatory fuel and water. Iím empty and dry, my thrist never really ending. With my jacket off, I also take the time to gobble a granola bar. Probably less than 5-minutes and Iím out of there. FYI, if you take note of the local terrain, you can drink and go at the same time in the middle of a gas station without getting your own boots wet. But do you really care at this point?

OK, this stuff just after Pioche was some fucked up shit. I mean, Iíve got over 6-gallons of fuel on board and now I have to beat my way through narrow sand washes and sage brush? Oh wait, the tire tracks Iím following arenít on the course, ergo, neither am I. When you get exhausted and hot enough, you start to not really care about the Ďrightí thing to do. Or maybe your idea of Ďrightí changes. Regardless, at this point I just aim for the edge of the 3-foot deep wash, loft the front wheel and pin it, half throwing myself and bike up-and-out of the sand snake and into the evil sage brush. At least up here I can get some bearings. I finally find the faint jeep trail and start riding ridges. Sure, itís rocky with trees encroaching on the course, but it beats fighting gravity and an ill-handling bike in the sand. At least there are some decent views and a light breeze up here.




But it doesnít last. The course drops into another sandy wash, luckily only to cross this time, and then onto another smoother dirt road heading northeast.

That reprieve is shortly lived, too. A right turn off of this nice smooth road onto an ATV trail that leads us to the downhill wash of death.



Sand, rocks and steep rises separated by ventures into the trees with off-camber and loose corners. Sometimes this side of the wash, sometimes that side of the wash. None of it is easy. It just goes and goes. After a little while, weíre just in the wash fighting the sand and rocks. Me and my bike really donít like this stuff. The front will hook for a second then wash out. The gas cap gasket leaks fuel and fumes. Iím hot with that nasty metallic-taste still in my mouth and thoughts of throwing up. Yeah, this is fun. Did I mention to go fuck yourself, Rob?

Finally learning my lesson, I see the right turn out of the wash coming up on the gps. But I donít see the trail. Lots of tracks going everywhere, mine included. The narrow wash doesnít allow an easy turn around, so I use several washes to accomplish the u-turn. At least I caught the turn before some of the others before me. It sure looks like they were having fun, though. The even-fainter track going up and out of the wash is hard to follow since there are ATV tracks going all over. So I take my time, despite my radiators pouring out the heat, to find the right course the first time through.

I finally roll into my first manned checkpoint in Spring Valley since Dwayne back at Puckerís crash site. I inform them of Wallyís issues and that Tim was with him, as well as the Pucker situation. Iím told to tell Fore!, who activated his HELP button, that a truck will be on itís way to get him, it just might be a while. Again, Iím off and riding.

The next several miles are easy going, gaining some altitude and generally just riding smooth and fast. But at the next downhill in the trees, itís very obvious to see Robís plan. Yeah, thereís a trail. Itís pretty easy to seeÖ.underneath all of the deadfall. What windstorm he concocted to cause this I donít know, but thank god itís at least downhill. You just need to pick your line carefully before committing, because turning around can be a bitch. Itís amazing how slow nasty stuff like this doesnít get to me (I do ride in the woods a lot). I just pick my line and twist the throttle, ducking my helmet whenever necessary. Iím not ashamed to bash into stuff as long as I keep moving. You can imagine my surprise at finding riders in here. I thought for sure everybody would be gone. Turns out Jean-Luc and Dirk had stopped to help Megan with a flat a while back, so they stuck together as they rolled into this. They looked hot and tired. At the one tough spot, Megan verified the line of choice and even held some of the branches back for me. I cleared it and helped her break some more off to make it easier for the two gentlemen to pass through. Since I really wasnít needed here, I continued on my way. More trees, more bushes, more bushwhacking. Fun fun!

The road opens up and my speeds increase. A right turn on a smooth road for a while (with full throttle, too) and weíre making time again. From here it starts to become a blur. I do remember bombing up this smooth road, gaining altitude and approaching more mountains when I had one of those Come-To-Jesus bike upsets that snaps you out of your exhausted, drug-induced hazes and makes you realize you REALLY need to concentrate to finish this day. It was out here, some 10-20 miles before Lund where I came upon Jamin. He followed me while I navigated downhill into the broad valley. At first, I had some navigation challenges, but eventually we were on a run due east and making some time on the two-track trail. Once on the smooth road, I took a little time to grab a snack before buttoning things up and twisting the throttle. Sorry, Jamin, but I need to make some time. Itís getting late.

Just outside of Lund, I find Jim with Fore!ís bike (as well as Fore! Himself). I do my job and inform him that truck will be along shortly for him and his bike before apologizing to Jamin and heading off eastward. This is somewhat familiar territory due to last year. Or so I thought.

Too soon, the course veers off the north side of the road and into the bush. Or sage to be more accurate. Oh, and sand, too. And letís not forget that despite appearances from a distance, this shit is NOT FLAt. And the coup de grace (ask Jean-LucÖ.), there is no fucking track. Just empty wasteland. And we have to ride through it. Yeah, hereís to you, Rob. And don't let this picture fool you, this was an easy section where I had the time and energy to take the camera out and snap a pic...







The fun exercise with the missing gate in the middle of all of this shit was just golden. Yeah sure, there were tracks going the right way. But they went the wrong way first, before backtracking to get back on course. And so was I.



Thankfully, none of the riders behind me were in sight. Iím feeling pretty good about my riding despite the break I took early in the day. And yes, this stuff is quite varied. Slow rough stuff, meandering two-track, and fast, smooth graded roads. Time can be made, but unexpected turns can easily take it away. Itís always a gamble between looking at the gps or looking at the road.

A couple of miles before the road crossing at Minersville Highway, I come upon a ranch truck. Once Iím in the zone, she speeds up and gets in the center of the road. Thereís no passing this with this dust and attitude. At the highway, she turns left. Thank god. I go straight and nail it. A mile or two later, Iím turning right onto a highway again (Gap Road), and there she is again. Lucky for me I cut the corner faster than her and took off. F U.

Yes, this is a public highway. Yes itís getting late. Screw the 25-mph speed limit through the rockfall-prone road. The faster you go, the less time youíre exposed to the hazard, right? Through Parowan Valley (or whatever itís called), I maintain a courteous pace near the ranches, but open it up again for the long straight to the undercrossing. Being chicken, I slow below 70 for the UC, but twist it again heading into the final stretch. Iím tired but thrilled. The day is almost over.

The final jab is the wet, weird stuff all over the road just before the end. Iím too chicken to test its properties, I just want to get off the bike. Instead of congrats, you finally made it, or, what took you so long, Iím greeted with jeers, giggles and finger pointing. ďHey, whatís up with the Harley pipe?Ē Rob says.

Huh?

It would seem my silencer mounting straps disappeared recently, allowing the pipe to sag enough to be nailed by the rising caliper on the swingarm, before rotating out 45-degrees, looking like some freak show thing from American Choppers. WTF?

It made it this far, I just need to go 2 more miles to the lodge. F-it, give me a beer.
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"I don't know what you do, but I know what I do, and I don't do that." --Uncle Doug, R.I.P.
"Without the possibility of death, adventure is not possible"--Reinhold Messner
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Old 10-14-2011, 10:32 PM   #24
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Some more nice story telling Ron. Shit Howdy!
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Old 10-14-2011, 10:50 PM   #25
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Fantastic report once again Ron!!! I love it and it makes me feel like if I was still there. My memory is definitely not as good and I barely remember how many times I crashed that day or how many times I thought f u Rob

You're always so cheerful and helpful that I'm almost "glad" to realize that it was really tough for you too. The forest of fallen trees can't be forgotten of course and the sage going on forever neither. The last section of the ride though was superb with fall colors on the Aspen trees and the beauty of a scenery at 10,000ft. Plus the joy to realize that the next day is a rest day
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Old 10-14-2011, 11:17 PM   #26
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Ron this is some of my favorite trails of the trip. I think the boonie bashin is a very real part of the nevada ride . I also had a complety different out look that day. Now the first day was almost as bad as the last for me
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ps Middlegate november?
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Old 10-14-2011, 11:21 PM   #27
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Jean Luc
rest day at 10,000 feet.....................on the third floor of the hotel
im old and fat fuck you rob
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Old 10-15-2011, 06:51 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean-Luc View Post
Fantastic report once again Ron!!! I love it and it makes me feel like if I was still there. My memory is definitely not as good and I barely remember how many times I crashed that day or how many times I thought f u Rob

You're always so cheerful and helpful that I'm almost "glad" to realize that it was really tough for you too.
Cheerful? That's not really the way I remember it.... I really was not my jovial self during this trip. Maybe I put on a good show during the gatherings, but I'm sure Charlie can chime in on my attitude when not in the spotlight. Not that I was mean or anything, just not happy-go-lucky me. Well, maybe except for the discussion of bandaids and nipples...Most nights were a struggle to remember what needed to be done and fighting for the energy to do it. The night at Jim's after day 2 was about the only time I said fuck it and let loose.
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Old 10-30-2011, 09:20 PM   #29
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Rest (?!) Day

After leaving the finish line yesterday evening, it was a short ride to the Cedar Breaks Lodge and Spa in the middle of downtown Brian Head, Utah. And despite our presence here last year, it looks like weíre welcomed back.





Check-in, unload, find the room. Oh, and letís not us forget up the climb up the stairs. Yeah, itís only two flights, but damn itís tiring at 10k feet up after riding all day. The evening is kind of a blur to me. I drink lots of water, take my pills (belatedly), and then think about dinner at Herrhelmetís villa in the trees. And even once there, most of the evening is foggy for me, and that was before we hit the cave of despair on the lower levelÖaka the bar. The things that stick with me are the birthday songs for Megan and my talk with Dirk. As crappy and unsocial as I was feeling, I also knew that I didnít have to ride tomorrow (at least while being timed), and that I could sleep in a bit.

OK, so sleeping in didnít happen. Like last year, the altitude made sleeping difficult. At least I was more hydrated than last year. Worrying about getting my exhaust issue handled, I decided to forgo breakfast at Jimís and ate at the hotel. Soon after, I was hitting the local general store looking for anything that might securely hold my exhaust in place. Finding no-joy there, I waited for the ATV/Sled shop to open to see what they could offer. After a little searching through their stockpile, they suggested that I head down the hill to Parowan for a real hardware store. Great. More riding, and now with a known broken bike. The upside is that Iíd be losing some altitude and gaining oxygen (and heat, as Iíd soon find out).

All well worth it. H&R Hardware was the oasis in the middle of my desert dusted funk of mechanical issues. Itís one of those small joints with stuff packed everywhere. With a rested and non-drugged mind, itís all stocked logically and pretty easy to find. And then thereís Cpt. Ron in the houseÖ.Despite the extra O2 just freely floating about, I still canít remember her directions on where to find the plumbers tape. So back to the counter to refresh my memory. A short hand holding exercise gets me what I need. In my previous efforts, I already located the fasteners I needed, now just need to find some tin snips to cut the stuff and a cold chisel to adjust my rear preload once Iím back in the stratosphere (Iíll source a hammer locally). The yard dude was kind enough to let me borrow his tin snips as he watches over my repairs in the parking lot and tells me about his C&J framed something-or-other vintage bike he has.



As Iím preparing to leave, I meet a local named Bob, who happens to be a WWII B-24 and B-29 vet. After some awesome stories, Iím back on the road heading for the mountain to commence the tire change and preload adjustment.





Back in the parking lot, a lot of activity is happening. Oil checked, air filter cleaned, tires changed, and EFI systems flushedÖ.






During my tire change, I discover the liquid sealant I used didnít evenly coat the interior of the Tubliss-enabled rear wheel system. And this is after following the directions explicitly. Well now, this is a new twist. The new tire, extra specially clean and dry on the inside goes on without issue. The subframe comes up with a little protest so I can access the rear shock to add ľĒ of preload. Iím hoping this will help to alleviate the front end pushing under acceleration that Iíve been dealing with for the past two days. A fresh air filter and tire sealant in the rear, and Iím ready for a shakedown run. Since the sealant directions say to ride for 5-10 minutes, I decide to head down the hill one more time since itís over 15 minutes to get there. Oh, and thereís a few more Oís there, too. Once down the hill, I end up back at H&R to get some bailing wire for Spafixer and some metric bolts for Jamin. On the return, I stop at a fruit stand and gorge on a peach and pear, both locally grown, and pack away some raspberries. The altitude and oxygen has finally let my appetite return, and Iím feeling famished. I stop at a local market for water to refill my hydration bladder (3l disappeared since this morning), and end up downing a half gallon of chocolate milk Ďcause it just looked so damn tasty. And oh boy it was.
I stopped partway back up the hill to rest by the stream and eat the berries and drink more water. As much as I wanted to nap, it just wouldnít happen. It was getting late in the afternoon and there was another catered dinner to be had. Gotta get going.



A quick stop at the hotel room for my latest prescription dose and some warm clothes, and then Iím off on the bike again to the chateau. Lazy me doesnít take much in the way of pictures, but the food was over the top. I may not have ridden like a king on this ride, but I sure did eat like one.



Due to the game being back on tomorrow and such, I make it out as early as possible so as to pack and rest for tomorrow.
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Old 11-02-2011, 07:38 PM   #30
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As always Ron, well told.
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