ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-29-2005, 03:30 PM   #16
ThirdCoast
Gnarly Adventurer
 
ThirdCoast's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Houston, Texas
Oddometer: 331
I have two submissions for you. My first bike - The Water Buffalo, A Suzuki 750, three cylinder, two stroke, water cooled, chain drive. I loved that bike. That might have been the first water cooled bike, I don't know.

Another wonder, in that I wonder what it was for, the Honda 750 with automatic transmission, WTF.
__________________
Current bikes: K1600GT and F800GS.
ThirdCoast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2005, 05:31 PM   #17
kbasa
Colnago!
 
kbasa's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Marin County, California
Oddometer: 64,721
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT jim
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
Yep. The CB900C circa 1982 or so.

Honda sold, to my knowledge, two automatic variants in the USA. The CB750A and the CM400A. I think they both used a two speed trans and the "clutch" lever on the left bar was a parking brake.
__________________
IMHO.

Fuck Cancer. Ride bikes. - dave + tina
kbasa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2005, 05:33 PM   #18
kbasa
Colnago!
 
kbasa's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Marin County, California
Oddometer: 64,721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick G
Though I have never ridden it, I have read a couple of articles on this topic and the Suzuki Madura is generally regarded as the worst of the mid '80s Jap bikes. A cruiser that looks as if it were styled by someone experimenting with halucinogens. I saw one once at Mid Ohio during Vintage, and I have to agree. One ugly mofo bike!

I think any of the bikes from HD during the AMF years would also qualify. They put a new meaning to the term, "quality control", as they obviously did not have any!

Just my uniformed and opinionated $0.02 worth.

Rick

My personal worst bike of all time - the Madura.

Japan tried to build all kinds of customs back in the 80s and damn near all of them looked simply horrid. The original Suzuki Intruder was the first one that sort of started to get it right, but even those weren't exactly attractive.
__________________
IMHO.

Fuck Cancer. Ride bikes. - dave + tina
kbasa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2005, 05:42 PM   #19
Rider
Moderator Emeritus
 
Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: The Heart Of It All
Oddometer: 2,811
My worst: the 1976 Kawasaki KZ750 verticle twin.
DAMHIK it sucked.
__________________
2012 FJR1300 - In Search Of Fast Sweepers
My Voice
Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2005, 06:39 PM   #20
markjenn
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
Oddometer: 10,249
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpbarlow
There was another bike that was under consideration but, despite being heavily advertised, I don't know that it ever reached production: the 1970ish BSA Fury/Triumph Bandit- a a modern DOHC twin dual sport- the development of which went a long way towards putting BSA (who owned Triumph at the time iirc) out of business. Maybe it should get the award just for that. Certainly worth a picture
Very interesting tangent here. I don't think the Bandit/Fury ever reached production - it was pulled at the last instant when Triumph/BSA realized that they bike wasn't going to be reliable and was going to have difficulty matching the performance of the ubiquitious Honda 350 of the era, let alone the two-stokes like the Yamaha RD350, Kawa A7, etc.

Certainly the Madura ranks up there.

I'm not sure the RE5 has ever really made it out of the doghouse - yes it has some collectable value now, but only because of its oddness - it's cool only in the same way an Edsel is cool and you don't see Edsels selling for six figures on Barrett Jackson like other 50's American cars.

I'm not sure the TX750 really deserves such a bad reputation. It has some problems, but they were generally not fatal and a bunch of folks put 50K+ on them without major issues, albeit with some oil leaks, noise, and vibration. The TX500s were Okay and sold reasonably well. I think the big issue with the TX750 was that it came out after the CB750 and about the time of the Z1, H2 750, and Suzuki GT750. Tough time to be coming out with a plain air-cooled parallel twin.

This is going back to an earlier era, but the W650 Kawasaki wasn't a very good bike and never sold well.

I'd probably put the early oil-in-frame Triumph twins right up there. From 69 to 71, Triumph somehow managed to go from having one of the best bikes in the Bonny to one of the worst. The Victor 441s were pretty awful too. And this was about the time of the Bandit/Fury debacle. Wow, the British motorcycle industry just imploded on the early 70's, so if you're choosing a bottom ten list you almost have to choose a couple of these turkeys.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2005, 07:03 PM   #21
wpbarlow OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Central NJ
Oddometer: 9,618
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThirdCoast
I have two submissions for you. My first bike - The Water Buffalo, A Suzuki 750, three cylinder, two stroke, water cooled, chain drive. I loved that bike. That might have been the first water cooled bike, I don't know.
Odd bike for "worst" choice; as it was in production for a few years, Suzuki sold a fair amount of them in many geographies, it did everything it promised, owners (like you did) generally liked it, and it introduced some inovations- first volume production water cooled bike (Scott Flying Squirrel being the first iirc), and first volume production dual disc front brake. Even the first ones had a 4LS front brake which was just about as good as anything that was available at the time. Add to that the fact that it was a somewhat successful road racer (against the TZ700/750). LAstly, they make killer cafe bikes something about the fairing/seat/tanks that someone made for them and the asymmetrical chambers really looks cool as a package and allowed dropping of 75 pounds or so; and it's suprising how much power potential the engine had. Might not be on my short list, but I could own one under the right circumstances.
wpbarlow is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2005, 10:29 PM   #22
vintagemxr
old fahrt, nobody special
 
vintagemxr's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: AZ
Oddometer: 553
The very first batch of TX750's in the USA had flawed castings in their inner case halves. Yamaha actually dispatched special teams around the country to dealers to pull engines apart and swap in new cases.

I always thought the TX750 was a nice clean design but the early poor reviews and word spreading about the case issue pretty much sealed the bike's fate.

I can't remember anymore what the issues were with the TX500. I know it was one of the early 4-valve head designs but I don't recall much beyond that.

The Suzuki RE5 Rotary would get my vote as maybe the worst bike or poorest concept from the Japanese.
__________________
'70 Bultaco Sherpa in pieces, 2 Corgis, and a camera
My pics My Blog
----------
"Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength" - Eric Hoffer
vintagemxr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 04:59 AM   #23
wpbarlow OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Central NJ
Oddometer: 9,618
Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagemxr
...The Suzuki RE5 Rotary would get my vote as maybe the worst bike or poorest concept from the Japanese.
Except for 1 thing, I'd tend to agree with you. However, that 1 thing is pretty significant- the R5 was considered (at the time) the best handling bike coming out of Japan and (more importantly) a good handler in absolute terms. The next bike designed by the guy (not team) who did the RE5 chassis was the GS750- which is properly considered a real turning point for the Japanese building bikes that could handle.
wpbarlow is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 06:03 AM   #24
iillyyaa
Adwrenchurer!
 
iillyyaa's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Littleton, MA
Oddometer: 2,420
I don't think that TX750 was bad. It handled well, or rather as well as could be expected of a bike from that period, and had enough motor to keep me happy.




Here's an interesting shot of the TX. How do you repark the bike after you lock the steering and leave the key in the hotel room? Like this:


I can't cast a vote for the "worst motorcycle ever," because I haven't ridden them all. But I can tell you that riding the Harley XLCR was one of the most miserable experiences (aside from crashing) that I had on two wheels.



--
Ilya
__________________
'09 KTM 690Duke - the best street bike I ever had!
'13 KTM 350EXCR - so far so awesome!
'08 KTM 450EXC-R - four seasons of NE enduros, and still going strong
'02 Suzuki SV650 CCS/LRRS #760 Expert
iillyyaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 10:34 AM   #25
ShaftEd
Beastly Adventurer
 
ShaftEd's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2001
Location: San Diego, CA USA
Oddometer: 3,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by iillyyaa
II can't cast a vote for the "worst motorcycle ever," because I haven't ridden them all. But I can tell you that riding the Harley XLCR was one of the most miserable experiences (aside from crashing) that I had on two wheels.

--
Ilya

Yes, I still have a 1977 XLCR, and I have to admit that while it is a beautiful bike, mechanically, it is a complete pile of pooh. Bad brakes, bad suspension, wobbly frame, weak generator/electrics, funky tranny, and slow to boot. However, even with all that crappy stuff, I still hated my 1985 K100RS more. Yep, awful two piston Brembo brakes, horribly soft suspension, horrible shaft effect, poor FI throttle response, funky 18" front/17" rear wheel. Nope even my XLCR handled better than that K100 POS.
ShaftEd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 11:18 AM   #26
Pantah
Red Sox Nation
 
Pantah's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: India Wharf
Oddometer: 9,928
Cyclones

My vote goes to the Suzi TM400 Cyclone (the orange beast!). Thank God it wasn't mine or I'd never have made 25.

-pantah
__________________
Straight ahead and faster -Bo Weaver 1970
"There I was..." -Griffin Niner Three Hotel
"One day closer to a parade..." Jonny Gomes, spring training 2013
Pantah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 01:52 PM   #27
309
Special Purpose
 
309's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Boulder, CO
Oddometer: 5,451
I'm sure some will disagree.....

The Honda XR650L.

Bought one new in '97. Biggest P.O.S. ever. Three top ends and a second gear, all in about 5000 miles. The bike literally spent more time in the shop than on the road.
309 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 09:16 PM   #28
vintagemxr
old fahrt, nobody special
 
vintagemxr's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: AZ
Oddometer: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpbarlow
Except for 1 thing, I'd tend to agree with you. However, that 1 thing is pretty significant- the R5 was considered (at the time) the best handling bike coming out of Japan and (more importantly) a good handler in absolute terms. The next bike designed by the guy (not team) who did the RE5 chassis was the GS750- which is properly considered a real turning point for the Japanese building bikes that could handle.
Hmm.. Interesting. I didn't know that about the RE5. I can recall reading the test articles when it came out and have seen a couple of the bikes over the years but the only thing that stuck with me about the bike was the odd styling and especially the "flip open" cover over the instrument cluster.
__________________
'70 Bultaco Sherpa in pieces, 2 Corgis, and a camera
My pics My Blog
----------
"Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength" - Eric Hoffer
vintagemxr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 09:25 PM   #29
ShaftEd
Beastly Adventurer
 
ShaftEd's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2001
Location: San Diego, CA USA
Oddometer: 3,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by 309
The Honda XR650L.

Bought one new in '97. Biggest P.O.S. ever. Three top ends and a second gear, all in about 5000 miles. The bike literally spent more time in the shop than on the road.
Yep, had one of those POS's too. 2nd gear blew and cracked head by 12000 miles. They don't handle right in the dirt either. Strange as the XR600R was always bulletproof and handled great.
ShaftEd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2005, 10:10 PM   #30
DirtDOG
Same Dog, New Tricks
 
Joined: Jan 2003
Location: The Globe -- NC
Oddometer: 17,754
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpbarlow
Nope- it was a Honda- the CB900 Custom. Worked pretty well actually, and sold for a few years. There was also an 1100C that had the two range trans also.
Nope. 1000cc
DirtDOG is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014