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Old 04-19-2012, 02:43 PM   #436
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abenteuerfahrer View Post
My friends....you prevailed...you made it to the southern end of the Americas; Ushuaia, Argentina...too you did make it to the Northern top end to Inuvik, NWT, Canada.

Congradulations and what an accomplishment and hope to see you both do many more. You're an inspiration to both young and old. Your Adventures have no doubt left you with great memories for life and the stories you will tell your children and grandchildren! I am sure this trip left you wiser, more patient, and with a tiny bit more focus on things that matter.

And so as Mark Twain said, "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindness, all foes to true understanding. Likewise tolerance, or broad, wholesome charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in our little corner of the earth all one's lifetime"

Cheers....
Thank you, sir. We have been fortunate enough to see some pretty amazing places by motorcycle and I think you're right - we have a few stories to share because of it. There is still a lot of world to see though...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramon View Post
As others have said, great report! Actually got me seriously thinking about making Argentina, my retirement spot...and I am only 42! Looking forward to the next installment
I wouldn't blame you - it is gorgeous and wild and full of places to explore. You've got to get down here if you haven't been already...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Horton View Post
Wunderfull photos!!!

About the brake pads I will follow Abenteuerfahrer. And about the Fender. Next time give a try. Fix it weak. Not hard.

I just make a calculation about our Chile trip, end of the year. Valparaiso-Nazca-going south (not till Ushuaia)-and back, 12.000km
As per the fender, how do you mean "fix it weak"? I've found a very quality welder who is going to work on the situation within the next couple days. Do you think I should just try and beef up and brace everything?

That's quite the trip you have planned - lots to see - hopefully our report has helped you guys plan a bit.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadracer_Al View Post
I don't think anyone here advocates indoor gasoline fires, or standing over the fuel while igniting it. I'd like to think most people outgrow that degree of inexperience.

So, Matt, two things - I hope you're storing your original photos to the cloud, and.... is it too early to use the word "book"?
We have a ton of places we're thinking of sending the bike after South America... it may be a bit too early .

Quote:
Originally Posted by prometheus rising View Post
Amazing ! The trip, the writing, the photography are electrifying. You two are doing it up right,

I appreciate the time and effort you are putting in to allow us to "ride along" with you

Big Boy is quite the rig, here's to getting your oil issues resolved succesfully
Thanks very much - I have probably said this a few times already, but we really love putting together posts to report. It gives us a lot of joy to hopefully help others who might be interested in a similar trip and to have something later to look back on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeman View Post
The fall colors of the trees is amazing. I don't think I've seen too many ride reports capture the fall down there (don't want to get close to winter I'd imagine). Great shots!
Just wait til the next post - we got caught in some nasty weather though I know it's nothing compared to actual winter in Patagonia, it was pretty frickin cold...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldone View Post
Matt & Kristen,

I'm going on 69 yrs. old and not the best of health so reading this from my recliner and day-dreaming is about the best that I'll hope for anymore. Some of your comments assure me that you two are being totally very grateful for being able to do this and to have each other. As an old man it's really great to see that so thanks for the efforts to allow someone like me to enjoy life from my chair and to follow along.

I hope that time and your travels will continue to heal the hurt that both of you are dealing with.

Gary
I'm glad that you're enjoying the report and I hope that our gratitude is coming across... we are completely aware that not everyone gets to make a trip like this in their life - we're trying to enjoy and live in every moment.
Thus far, it has been extremely therapeutic to travel like this - Kristen has been really inspirational as far as that goes and we've had a lot of really important conversations along the way. We're coming up on the year anniversary of Ryan's death... I can't believe it...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogslayer View Post
Just checking in to see how you two were doing, hopefully you made it somewhere by now and are taking care of that oil leak problem.

I hope that German engineering hasn't left you stranded somewhere along the road..."knock on wood"....
We have officially made it to Santiago and the BMW dealership is taking a look at the bike as I type this. The bike ran great all the way down and back up here aside from the drooling problem. Hopefully it's nothing too serious!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagletalon View Post
Finally all caught up! I have to say that Perito Moreno has always been one of those destinations that I hope one day to make it to. Great pics as always and you guys seem to be having a blast. Thanks for the constant updating. It has been amazing to be part of this ride with you guys.

Later
John
Thank you, John. We are truly having a blast - lots of laughter and joy at being in such a beautiful place. We've got a lot more to go though - I hope you'll continue to follow along...

As far as all the responses to the brake pad situation, thank you so much for your time. We were able to make it to Santiago on our old pads and we're hoping that after we get the leak taken care of, all will be well with the brakes once we swap out old pads for the new. Thanks!
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Old 04-19-2012, 03:01 PM   #437
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Day 45-48 in South America: Ushuaia to Puerto Natales

Day 45-48 in South America: Ushuaia, Argentina to Puerto Natales, Chile



Any decently intelligent human could tell you that the seasons of Patagonia, seeing as it resides in the Southern Hemisphere, are reversed from that of the USA. Fall in Texas is Spring in Chile. Summer in Montana is Winter in Argentina. Pretty basic stuff. However, knowing these facts and respecting them are two completely different concepts...

*

After hiding from the rainy weather for too many days, we finally decided to leave our comfortable hostel and Ushuaia. BigBoi was a bit upset about the whole thing seeing as he was finally making a few friends.


The morning looked bleak. It was spitting rain, cold, muddy and just all around miserable outside. The girl at the front desk was completely floored when we said we were finally taking off. She could not comprehend why anyone would venture out into such nasty weather. One of the cleaning staff actually said a quick prayer for Kristen as she was walking out. I was suddenly reminded of our experience in Eagle Plains, Canada as we were trying to ride the Dempster Highway in historically horrible weather. As we were walking out into the now freezing rain, Kristen mentioned something about possibly taking a look at our decision making paradym...

*

As BigBoi was warming up and Kristen had stepped inside for a moment, an old man who had been staying at the hostel with a group of other military veterans (for the 30th anniversary of the Falkland War) came out to speak with me. We had passed each other many times over the past few days and had shared a few smiles and warm greetings but nothing more. But now, the man was intent on having a conversation before we left. He started in with a quick and lisp-ridden Spanish which I absolutely could not understand. I tried to interrupt just to let him know that I spoke only a little Spanish but he stopped me and said, “escucha” - “listen”. He continued with huge, sweeping hand movements, a slight grin and a sparkle in his gray eyes. Finally, he grabbed my shoulder with his left hand, placed his right on my heart, and spoke slowly, “Argentina es para su corazón. No se olvide” - “Argentina is for your heart. Don’t forget.” Although I could only understand 10% of what he was saying, his words struck me with force. We shook hands, he winked and we went our separate ways.

*

We then began our trek out of town after waiting in line for half an hour for a tank of gas for the bike.


*

As soon as we got past the city limits, the rain changed to sleet...


*



*

...then snow.


*

As we rose into the mountain pass the roads really got nasty. The line of cars we were following were crawling along at 10 mph and we ended up passing a car that had just slid off the road into a ditch. I tried braking at some point and immediately lost control - engine braking was a much smarter choice.


*

The worst of it came right at the peak of the pass. I stupidly decided to stop and grab a picture right when the wind started really gusting. Needless to say, we were a bit chilly.


*

At some point as we were riding, the bike thermometer read 27 degrees with a mean-spirited, flashing snowflake symbol that reminded me that it was indeed cold outside as if my frostbitten hands weren’t reminding me enough. Speaking of hands, my Rev’it H2O Winter gloves are neither waterproof or warm. Seeing that I’m already complaining, I should also mention that my Gerbing heated jacket only works on one side and that my left heated grip on the BMW has quit. Ok, I'm done...


*

Throughout the day, the snow turned to rain and then cleared way for a crushing wind from the West. We crossed back into Chile and hit the nasty bit of gravel road that had broken the sidecar fender on the way South. Sure enough, it took another casualty as the plug we had for the rear tire failed. Thankfully, Kristen comes from generations of men familiar with the art of tires and tire repair - her Grandfather owned a tire store in Ohio and her father worked there for a time. She got us set up with a new plug and we were off.


*

We eventually made our way through 50 knot gusts to Rio Grande and called it a day. We found a hotel, dragged our gear inside, turned the shower on as hot as possible and cramed ourselves into the tiny bathroom with all our clothes on. Needless to say, we were whipped.

*

We woke up the next morning and made our way off of Tierra del Fuego and back towards Punta Arenas. Again, snow was everywhere and the roads were slick.


*



*



*

Kristen was wondering why we weren’t on tropical beach instead...


*



*



*

After a muddy night in Punta Arenas, we shot up to Puerto Natales once again. After finding a pretty nice hostel with secure parking....


*

...we ran out to do some urgent business. Within the hour, we had secured a berth on the Navimag Evangelistas - a ferry that would take us on a five day journey from Puerto Natales to Puerto Montt. With a few days to burn before leaving, we set about seeing the town a bit more and doing a few chores.


*

Kristen was able to find two rings that she adores from a tiny jewlers shop. The man who crafted them held us captive for an hour and a half to practice his English and pepper us with questions about our trip - we didn’t mind as his dog was sweet and so was the conversation.


*

It took some searching, but we were able to find a good hardware store that had several things we needed - straps, some nuts and bolts, oil, tape and a few other various tools.


*

They also had a whole row of diving gear - never in my life have I seen a 14 mm wetsuit.


*



*

Other than that, we found a huge german shepherd with no tail that we nicknamed “Nubs”. He followed us everywhere and was continually trying to get us to play fetch with the rocks he picked up and then spat at our feet. I shot some video of him that I’ll have to share later.

*

We also did our fair share of eating and I thought I’d document a pretty normal meal for us when we actually eat out.

As far as we can tell, both Chile and Argentina loves bread. You get it with every meal and most times it is served with salsa. Kristen is not much of a meat eater so much of what she orders revolves around avoiding it. Grilled cheese is a favorite. I personally will eat just about anything, so much so that I will probably end up getting sick at some point. This particular meal was a soup called Paila Marina - essentially just a broth packed with all sorts of shellfish. Delicious.


*

It also should be mentioned that the service in restaurants is very different than that of the USA. We’re used to sitting down, food coming quickly, and then the wait staff politely urging us out the door as to fill our spots with more paying customers. This particular occasion was a perfect example of how things operate around here:

1. We sit at an empty table.
2. We wait for 5 minutes before our drink order is taken.
3. We wait a 5 more minutes and menus are brought out.
4. We wait 10 minutes and our order is taken.
5. We wait 5 minutes and bread and salsa is brought out.
6. We wait 10 more minutes and food is served.
7. We eat.
8. We spend the next 15 minutes trying to get someone’s attention so that we can beg them to let us pay.


It is, of course, just a cultural thing, but Kristen and I have never been a couple to make eating an “experience”. We normally like to enjoy our food and then promptly leave to do other things. This is not possible in South America thus far. I suppose it’s a good exercise in patience...

*

Next up: The Ferry.
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Old 04-19-2012, 10:18 PM   #438
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I've observed in Mexico that you are generally left alone until you give a little wave or nod to your waiter, then they come over. They don't automatically fill water glasses either. If you understand that is the way it works, it takes a lot of the bad spin off.
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Old 04-20-2012, 03:41 AM   #439
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Howdy. I hope all is well with you, Kristen and the bike. Nice meeting you in Puerto Natales. Maybe we'll see y'all down the road. Troy
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:13 AM   #440
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Old 04-20-2012, 10:23 AM   #441
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I believe to get the check, make eye contact with the waiter or waitress and make a writing motion in the air, mouthing "la cuenta." I think that'll do the trick. Watch other people to see if they do it, not sure if that's common outside Buenos Aires.
Time is a German concept in the U.S., you eat and drive fast, often sleeping little and heaven forbid you show up late. You wake up early in the morning and expect everything right now, this minute, yesterday. You'll learn to relax. Everything is slow down there, don't know exactly why, but they're more into the siestas, stay up all night, show up late and savor every minute of the day schedule. That I find awesome and frankly, I miss it.
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Old 04-20-2012, 01:05 PM   #442
mightymatt43 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadracer_Al View Post
I've observed in Mexico that you are generally left alone until you give a little wave or nod to your waiter, then they come over. They don't automatically fill water glasses either. If you understand that is the way it works, it takes a lot of the bad spin off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ishdishwishfish View Post
I believe to get the check, make eye contact with the waiter or waitress and make a writing motion in the air, mouthing "la cuenta." I think that'll do the trick. Watch other people to see if they do it, not sure if that's common outside Buenos Aires.
Time is a German concept in the U.S., you eat and drive fast, often sleeping little and heaven forbid you show up late. You wake up early in the morning and expect everything right now, this minute, yesterday. You'll learn to relax. Everything is slow down there, don't know exactly why, but they're more into the siestas, stay up all night, show up late and savor every minute of the day schedule. That I find awesome and frankly, I miss it.
Hopefully it didn't sound like I was complaining. I was actually just trying to report on the difference between service in the States and what to expect down here. It's honestly grown on both of us and we've never had anything but pleasant experiences once we get the wait staff's attention. Most everyone has actually been really nice and patient with our bad Spanish. Especially as we've learned the keywords that get results. It's part of the refining process of travel... one of the many reasons I like getting out of my comfort zone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by troyfromtexas View Post
Howdy. I hope all is well with you, Kristen and the bike. Nice meeting you in Puerto Natales. Maybe we'll see y'all down the road. Troy
Good to meet you too - ride safely and definitely let me know if you need anything from the States when we go back for a few weeks, I'd be glad to bring back some parts, etc.


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Old 04-20-2012, 01:12 PM   #443
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Yes things are definitely slower in South America.

When we were traveling around down there, we would go out to eat 'late' in the evening by our standards, i.e. 7-8pm, and we would literally be the only ones in the restaurant. Most others were just starting to trickle in by 9pm and by 10pm when we were leaving the place would be hopping.
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Old 04-20-2012, 02:00 PM   #444
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Good God! That weather! Hopefully you are driving out of it.
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Old 04-20-2012, 05:07 PM   #445
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Thumb This!!



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Old 04-20-2012, 11:56 PM   #446
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CessPool View Post
Yes things are definitely slower in South America.

When we were traveling around down there, we would go out to eat 'late' in the evening by our standards, i.e. 7-8pm, and we would literally be the only ones in the restaurant. Most others were just starting to trickle in by 9pm and by 10pm when we were leaving the place would be hopping.
Jep, the same in Southeurope. As a german in Spain, Portugal or Italy, you are way to early in the restaurants. And, it is unusally for a german, you have to wait for the waitress. You'll be seated! Ups!!!

In Spain no ones went directly to the restaurant. First have a drink in the restaurant bar. You looking around. Oh, nice, an empty restaurant. . .

Big mistake. . .



I tell my wife, to follow your thread to. So she know, what could happen in Southamerica. . .


How to make weak and fix?!? Okay, I have to travel, Job, to Sardinia tomorrow, for three weeks or so. So I have time to take a look for parts to name them, to explain.
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Old 04-21-2012, 03:15 PM   #447
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Hallo Horton, glaube dass Ich es Matt erklaeren kann was Du meinst ueber "weak"!

Hi Matt and Kristie...what inmate Horton meant by "weak" is NOT to tighten the nuts/bolt to it's torgue but let it a bit loose so that it can basically "give" a bit... but assuming you are using a Nylok nut!

We cannot see the actual fender fittings...you got a huge fender that is I assume held together by only 2-3 hold-downs. One really needs 4 and with rubber pushings to boot for Ruta 40 like terrains.

Cheers..
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Old 04-21-2012, 10:38 PM   #448
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Thank you both, a true inspiration

Your love for each other shows strong & deep. Thanks for sharing such a terrific journey.

Did you know the drummer for Rush who lost his wife & I believe his daughter also in an auto accident took a yr or so off from playing. He just rode his BMW all round North America. Travel has a way of clarifing and healing life's changes to us. I have you in my prayers, vio con Dios mi amigos.
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Old 04-22-2012, 01:38 AM   #449
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I guess it is all a matter of perspective, we think you guys do things too fast, that you dont take the time to savour life.

And you DEFINITELY have dinner way too early who's even hungry at that time

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Jep, the same in Southeurope. As a german in Spain, Portugal or Italy, you are way to early in the restaurants. And, it is unusally for a german, you have to wait for the waitress. You'll be seated! Ups!!!

In Spain no ones went directly to the restaurant. First have a drink in the restaurant bar. You looking around. Oh, nice, an empty.
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Old 04-22-2012, 06:44 AM   #450
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CessPool View Post
Yes things are definitely slower in South America.

When we were traveling around down there, we would go out to eat 'late' in the evening by our standards, i.e. 7-8pm, and we would literally be the only ones in the restaurant. Most others were just starting to trickle in by 9pm and by 10pm when we were leaving the place would be hopping.
That is another really funny thing about eating out down here - the time schedule. Especially in the big cities. I have a feeling that the US is all alone on this one... only families with children and older folks seem to eat at 7-8 pm. You can really spot the foreigners by when they go out to dinner!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Horton View Post
Jep, the same in Southeurope. As a german in Spain, Portugal or Italy, you are way to early in the restaurants. And, it is unusally for a german, you have to wait for the waitress. You'll be seated! Ups!!!

In Spain no ones went directly to the restaurant. First have a drink in the restaurant bar. You looking around. Oh, nice, an empty restaurant. . .

Big mistake. . .

I tell my wife, to follow your thread to. So she know, what could happen in Southamerica. . .

How to make weak and fix?!? Okay, I have to travel, Job, to Sardinia tomorrow, for three weeks or so. So I have time to take a look for parts to name them, to explain.
I guess that's just part of travel - learning to relax and go with the flow of the culture you're in. The longer we're away from home, the more relaxed we'll get. I can already tell that by how we choose hostels now as compared to how we chose hostels at the beginning. Your wife will be fine! It's all in good fun. As far as making a weak fix - I think Elmer weighed in on that...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Abenteuerfahrer View Post
Hallo Horton, glaube dass Ich es Matt erklaeren kann was Du meinst ueber "weak"!

Hi Matt and Kristie...what inmate Horton meant by "weak" is NOT to tighten the nuts/bolt to it's torgue but let it a bit loose so that it can basically "give" a bit... but assuming you are using a Nylok nut!

We cannot see the actual fender fittings...you got a huge fender that is I assume held together by only 2-3 hold-downs. One really needs 4 and with rubber pushings to boot for Ruta 40 like terrains.

Cheers..
Ah, I see. I definitely would need a Nylok nut to do that - I haven't searched really hard but I have looked at a lot of smaller hardware stores. No luck so far. We head back to the States for a few weeks for my sister's wedding in a few days so I'll pick some up then. Thanks for the heads up. I'll have to get some rubber pushings too...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Go-4-It View Post
Your love for each other shows strong & deep. Thanks for sharing such a terrific journey.

Did you know the drummer for Rush who lost his wife & I believe his daughter also in an auto accident took a yr or so off from playing. He just rode his BMW all round North America. Travel has a way of clarifing and healing life's changes to us. I have you in my prayers, vio con Dios mi amigos.
Thanks for following along...
I actually started reading the book, Ghost Rider, years before Kristen's brother passed. At the time, I wasn't really prepared to read something that intense and I ended up putting it down. I really ought to look it up again.
I am thoroughly convinced, even after only about 5 months on the road, that this trip has been monumentally healing for the both of us. I don't know how things would have gone had we stayed put. Thank you for your prayers.


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Originally Posted by antipode View Post
I guess it is all a matter of perspective, we think you guys do things too fast, that you dont take the time to savour life.

And you DEFINITELY have dinner way too early who's even hungry at that time
I can totally understand that. Taking time to relax is something that we could both do better - I will say, however, that we definitely are savoring where life has taken us!
As far as the time of dinner - I don't think that's something that will change for us... so late!


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Originally Posted by Toadride View Post
Good God! That weather! Hopefully you are driving out of it.
Yeah man - as a couple of Texans we were pretty freezing. Thankfully we're out of the snow for now!

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Muchas Gracias!
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