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Old 06-15-2015, 09:40 AM   #1
AK Rider/MotoQuest OP
Ride Alaska & Beyond
 
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Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Alaska, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles
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PHOTOS: Tales of the Dalton Highway - Alaska

Tales from the Dalton

Alaska's Dalton Highway is an icon in the world of adventure motorcycling. Those who have conquered this treacherous road will surely never forget the experience, and those who are thinking of crossing it off their list should come prepared for everything.

At 414 miles long, the Dalton Highway runs from Fairbanks to Deadhorse, taking anyone willing the risk from the center of the state of Alaska to the shores of the Arctic Ocean. Named for Alaskan engineer James Dalton, the Highway has made an appearance on a number of lists of treacherous roads and dangerous jobs, both in print and on television, including several seasons of the History channel hit Ice Road Truckers. But reality TV aside, the Dalton Highway offers travelers as many rewards as it does challenges. Take a look at some of the photos below from our previous rides up and down the Dalton, and scroll down to the bottom for some helpful information about planning your trip on the Dalton.

The group that just finished up our Prudhoe Bay Adventure last week just barely made it up the Dalton following some road closures due to flooding. They were told they were the first group of motorcyclists to make it through this season! Check out more in guide Dan Patino's tour update on our blog.





Heading out of Fairbanks, Alaska, you'll hook up with the Dalton Highway and head north across the Arctic Circle to your eventual destination at Deadhorse, Alaska. Along the way, you'll witness firsthand how vast and beautiful this state is.









No matter how nice the weather may seem when you embark on your Dalton Highway journey, conditions in Alaska are always unpredictable.



Riders must be prepared for wind, rain and snow and extremely slick, muddy roads.





You must always be on the lookout for the trucks that run to and from the oil fields of Prudhoe Bay.





The roads take a beating, and so do the bikes.





But if you can brave the potential storms and poor road conditions, you'll be rewarded with spectacular views of the majestic Alaskan peaks and pristine wilderness.











And along with the views, you'll hit notable landmarks like the Arctic Circle crossing and can even walk to the edge of the world on the slushy "shores" of the Arctic Ocean.





Want to start planning your Dalton Highway ride?

Join us on an organized group ride, like our Prudhoe Bay Adventure, which removes all the planning and includes the peace of mind of having a dedicated support truck on hand. If you're more of a do-it-yourselfer, then perhaps we can set you up with a bike rental. The Dalton takes a heavy toll on all vehicles that travel it, so spare your own bike and take one of our prepared dual sports instead! And whatever you do, make sure you read founder Phil Freeman's article on our blog: The 10 Dos and Don'ts of the Dalton. It is a wealth of information and solid advice for anyone considering making the trek.



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