ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-06-2013, 07:04 PM   #2266
DomEOD
'murica
 
DomEOD's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Ft Carson, CO and SoCal
Oddometer: 2,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhb View Post
Well, after much debate on either replacing my 2004 1150RT with a 1200GS or 800GS, or keeping the RT and buying something smaller, I decided on the latter, and picked up a 2013 Sertao this weekend.

Put 150ish miles on it this weekend, really a blast to ride. My one only concern so far is the trans - it seems to really dislike shifting from 2-3-4. No issues w/ 1-2. Seems like it wants needs extra time for the RPM's to drop before it'll allow the 2-3 shift, but even after I've been off the throttle for plenty of time, and clutch in. Definitely like nothing I've experienced before, and I don't recall any break-in issues when I got my RT years ago. We'll see how it goes.

Anyway, a minor issue for now, unless it doesn't fix itself.

Sorry - no great pics yet, other than the obligatory:

I hate that Starbucks. I met my Ex there
DomEOD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 07:19 PM   #2267
kdennan
Studly Adventurer
 
kdennan's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Vermont, USA
Oddometer: 621
SHIT!!!!
I was just goofing around, reading some threads and I went into the face plant section and came across a thread from some poor lady that had the fork on her G650GS (2011) break on the right side axle clamp. She was very lucky to not be totally wrecked from the fall, but now I'm a little concerened about my forks. Does anyone know anything about this?
__________________
"F#%* you I won't do what you tell me!"
Rage Against The Machine
kdennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 07:25 PM   #2268
Adventure MotoX
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Adventure MotoX's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates / Used to be Ottawa
Oddometer: 271
Oh man, don't open that can of worms... that G650GS thread was beaten to death and died... Yeah there was one photo and incident but most of us concluded that the axel was bent in the pic and there must have been something else to the story. BMW had an issue with the forks on the 650's back in the early 2000's until about 2003 or so but has since redesigned them. The forks them selves are made by Showa.

I was worried at first but no longer.

Cheers


Quote:
Originally Posted by kdennan View Post
SHIT!!!!
I was just goofing around, reading some threads and I went into the face plant section and came across a thread from some poor lady that had the fork on her G650GS (2011) break on the right side axle clamp. She was very lucky to not be totally wrecked from the fall, but now I'm a little concerened about my forks. Does anyone know anything about this?
__________________
Motorrad

www.AdventureMotoX.com
Adventure MotoX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 07:59 PM   #2269
ferals5
f5eral
 
ferals5's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Goulburn, Australia
Oddometer: 1,021
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdennan View Post
SHIT!!!!
I was just goofing around, reading some threads and I went into the face plant section and came across a thread from some poor lady that had the fork on her G650GS (2011) break on the right side axle clamp. She was very lucky to not be totally wrecked from the fall, but now I'm a little concerened about my forks. Does anyone know anything about this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by studioe6 View Post
Oh man, don't open that can of worms... that G650GS thread was beaten to death and died... Yeah there was one photo and incident but most of us concluded that the axel was bent in the pic and there must have been something else to the story. BMW had an issue with the forks on the 650's back in the early 2000's until about 2003 or so but has since redesigned them. The forks them selves are made by Showa.

I was worried at first but no longer.

Cheers
ferals5 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 04:11 AM   #2270
kdennan
Studly Adventurer
 
kdennan's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Vermont, USA
Oddometer: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferals5 View Post





I got a little nerved. The wife had been up my arse all day
All good
besides, I've beat the shit out of mine already so they would have broke by now.
sorry to bring it up
__________________
"F#%* you I won't do what you tell me!"
Rage Against The Machine
kdennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 10:18 AM   #2271
windowto
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: NJ
Oddometer: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by nylon2000 View Post
Shifting? Lol, mine's a mess from 1-N-2, but the rest is ok.

I've 5,000 miles on mine, and currently have to hold the lever up, while releasing the clutch, as it won't take in second unless i continue to hold it up until the gears engage.

Plus, i can get into neutral without the light showing up about 25% of the time.

Lots of wasted times at stop lights etc, as i "search" for neutral, while staring at the dashboard.

I'll tell BMW at my 6,000 mile service, but i doubt they can do anything productive.

I've just learned to deal with it.
Guys,

While the shifting on the Sertao is not Japanese-smooth, I really believe the gearbox is not THE problem. I Really think it's the clutch. The clutch just does not disengage fully. This puts a load on the gears and inhibits smooth shifting. The problem is that the clutch lever does not have enough throw (pull). As I said before, if you try to adjust the cable to have the required 1-2 mm play, it would shift like a tractor.

If you don't believe me, try an experiment. Adjust clutch lever to have maximum throw (furthest away from the rider). Tighten the cable a little. Take out the play and then tighten a little more. Take the bike out for a spin. Bet you it will shift much better. Of course everything comes at a cost: over-tighten the cable, and the clutch slips. Also the pressure bearing is always under load.

So, without modifying the bike, you can only find a compromise tension on the cable. It still puts more wear on the clutch components, but provides smoother shifting. I also prefer to replace a clutch down the road instead of ruining the gears.

The better solution would be, if it was possible to find non-OEM clutch lever with longer travel.

My 2 cents.
windowto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 10:32 AM   #2272
Gundy
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Philly 'burbs
Oddometer: 921
shifting

I guess I am pretty lucky or am just used to bikes that are much worse. I did notice that changing my timing just a little so that I am putting a little pressure on the shift lever before disengaging the clutch helps...think of taking the slack out of the system so its ready to go when you finally squeeze the clutch. Quicker smoother shifting is the result. I have a had a couple of Japanese bikes that did not even need the clutch in the dirt if you timed it well...probably wouldn't try that on the pavement though...
__________________
'12 Sertao
'00 KDX220

'12 Tenere, '04 Tiger, '09 WRR, '06 DRZ, '06 TW, '01 250 EXC, '09 KLR
Gundy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 11:24 AM   #2273
matloik
kludge
 
matloik's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: PDX | Hood River
Oddometer: 1,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gundy View Post
I guess I am pretty lucky or am just used to bikes that are much worse. I did notice that changing my timing just a little so that I am putting a little pressure on the shift lever before disengaging the clutch helps...think of taking the slack out of the system so its ready to go when you finally squeeze the clutch. Quicker smoother shifting is the result. I have a had a couple of Japanese bikes that did not even need the clutch in the dirt if you timed it well...probably wouldn't try that on the pavement though...
My understanding and experience with this bike's solid, tractor-like tranny/clutch/shifting is that a few things apply and make shifting better: 1) Get the revs up, don't wussy foot around shifting at low rpms, 2) Pre-load the shifter, and nik it into gear as part of the clutch lever pull--not after you've fully pulled it in all the way, 3) Clutch lever play matters, it likes to be at the right admustment.
__________________
'08 Versys & '08 450 EXC-R / '11 G650GS & '06 KLX250S (wife's)
Portland Area Off Pavement Rides ~ Hood River Rides ~ Vancouver Island Trip
matloik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 03:09 PM   #2274
kdennan
Studly Adventurer
 
kdennan's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Vermont, USA
Oddometer: 621
My shifting was a little hit or miss in the beginning, but after just about 1k it got better. IMOP it's not a high end racer, so I usually just get her up and pull the clutch and make a nice deliberate shift. No speedy shift. But now after 6k I do get frisky when I take her in the woods and no complaints from the gearbox at all.
__________________
"F#%* you I won't do what you tell me!"
Rage Against The Machine
kdennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 03:37 PM   #2275
windowto
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: NJ
Oddometer: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gundy View Post
I guess I am pretty lucky or am just used to bikes that are much worse. I did notice that changing my timing just a little so that I am putting a little pressure on the shift lever before disengaging the clutch helps...think of taking the slack out of the system so its ready to go when you finally squeeze the clutch. Quicker smoother shifting is the result. I have a had a couple of Japanese bikes that did not even need the clutch in the dirt if you timed it well...probably wouldn't try that on the pavement though...
Hey Guys, whatever floats your boat. If it works for you, why bother? It works for me too. This is why I never really brought it up until now. I was just responding to the discussion. In my opinion the clutch not completely disengaging has a lot to do with rough shifting. This is why you get that clunk when you put it in first gear to begin with. Yes, it all gets smoother with time ( the clutch gets smoother too).

As Gundy pointed out you can shift without clutch altogether. I've done it on this bike without a problem. But this does not prove it's not the clutch, it only shows that you can compensate for the clutch to a point where you don't even need it (except for initial go from fully stopped). Compensating is what many do by adopting their shifting technique to the bike.

I don't want to get into a big pissing competition and to try to prove me right. If you are curious, you can experiment with the cable tension to satisfy your curiosity. Wouldn't cost you a penny. If you are not, don't bother.

As I said in the beginning: whatever floats your boat . Next topic?
windowto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 04:37 PM   #2276
swamp
U lie&yo'breff stank
 
swamp's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: lower appalachia, Alabama
Oddometer: 1,795
itll be ok

just dont look at it and it will go away
__________________
Enduro Earth
YOUTUBE

off the grid and deep in the woods
swamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 06:48 PM   #2277
kdennan
Studly Adventurer
 
kdennan's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Vermont, USA
Oddometer: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by swamp View Post
itll be ok

just dont look at it and it will go away

Did you notice any thing like a bit of a stumble from idiling down to back on the throttle at 2,500 rpm's after you installed the Leo Vince?
I get a little bit when I'm puttering along in 3rd while smelling the maple blossoms:)
__________________
"F#%* you I won't do what you tell me!"
Rage Against The Machine
kdennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 07:14 PM   #2278
swamp
U lie&yo'breff stank
 
swamp's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: lower appalachia, Alabama
Oddometer: 1,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdennan View Post
Did you notice any thing like a bit of a stumble from idiling down to back on the throttle at 2,500 rpm's after you installed the Leo Vince?
I get a little bit when I'm puttering along in 3rd while smelling the maple blossoms:)
yes, you have to reset the computer thingy
__________________
Enduro Earth
YOUTUBE

off the grid and deep in the woods
swamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 09:04 PM   #2279
windowto
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Location: NJ
Oddometer: 799
Quote:
Originally Posted by swamp View Post
itll be ok

just dont look at it and it will go away
Like the Police car in a rear view mirror .

Swamp,

Just curious, why did you go with the 18 inch wheel?
windowto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 09:18 PM   #2280
swamp
U lie&yo'breff stank
 
swamp's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: lower appalachia, Alabama
Oddometer: 1,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by windowto View Post
Like the Police car in a rear view mirror .

Swamp,

Just curious, why did you go with the 18 inch wheel?
because the YZ forks raise it in the front. have to even it out in the rear with the 18. also 18 is better off road . the bike is taller than stock now, more ground clearance.
the problem i've found is that i need to be careful with tire sizes and chain length... you may have noticed the consequences of getting it wrong.
__________________
Enduro Earth
YOUTUBE

off the grid and deep in the woods
swamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014