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Old 04-08-2012, 06:06 PM   #16
CurDog
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Holy Smokes!!! This is Great!!

This RR is fantastic! I am just starting to catch up with past videos but I wanted to quickly share how much I like what I have seen so far. Jackson you do a great job of narrating throughout the video while interspersing action shots. This is 5 star material. Keep it up.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:22 AM   #17
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I'm in on this one. At the very least I need to find out if this friendship can be "something more".
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Heh heh, will see, will see.

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Originally Posted by CurDog View Post
This RR is fantastic! I am just starting to catch up with past videos but I wanted to quickly share how much I like what I have seen so far. Jackson you do a great job of narrating throughout the video while interspersing action shots. This is 5 star material. Keep it up.
Ah mate, appreciate your comments! They take time but I think they are worth the effort... if you watch back over the past ones you will see how I am honing the format and improving everything each time as I go. My goal for this week is the get the next video up and put in another 2 written ride reports.

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Old 04-10-2012, 04:28 AM   #18
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Very very good reports, keep it up and good luck! your doing something i dream about. With money being my issue, how much have you budget for this trip? if you don't mind me asking.

all the best
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Old 04-11-2012, 06:35 AM   #19
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Here is the latest video blog... if you are reading the written reports here I am ahead in those and then catching up in the video blogs. I have now cracked 2.5 hours of total edited video blogs since I started last October! At this rate by the time I am finished I will have about 7 hours of total edited video blog.



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Very very good reports, keep it up and good luck! your doing something i dream about. With money being my issue, how much have you budget for this trip? if you don't mind me asking.

all the best

My budget for this trip is 30k. Take into account though that I also spent 3 months travelling around Asia and I took the Trans-mongolian railroad 1st class to Moscow (things I had always wanted to do) - so about 5k alone went on that. I also spent a lot more money before I left on things like immunisation ($700! can you believe that), $1k on travel insurance, etc. etc. and other things than what I expected. Chances are my plans are going to have to change a fair bit from what you would see in my first blogs. May have to go home for a few months and make some more money before heading to South America. Will see... Realistically, if I was to look at it again after being on the road this time, to go around the world in relative comfort (that is not eating rice everyday) I would want about $40k (USD) plus the bike - assuming I am not stopping to work along the way and going to travel for at least 12 months on the road. Having said that, if you wait for everything to be perfect you will never leave.
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Old 04-11-2012, 10:37 PM   #20
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I'm in for this

Great vids and narrative I'm in for the duration
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Old 04-12-2012, 08:24 AM   #21
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Only getting Better!

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Ah mate, appreciate your comments! They take time but I think they are worth the effort... if you watch back over the past ones you will see how I am honing the format and improving everything each time as I go. My goal for this week is the get the next video up and put in another 2 written ride reports.
Jackson... I can only imagine how time consuming each video is. I know how long it takes me to put together a slide show... selecting my shots, editing, adjusting, etc and that has got to be infinitely easier than what you are doing. How many minutes of video do you shoot to produce a 10 minute clip? I would imagine a lot.

You are definitely getting better. I just watched your latest video and have also watched 10 of the early ones. I like how you run the audio independent of the video. This allows the video clips to keep changing but the audio provides a consistent theme.

The only criticism is the camera you are using does not handle low light very well. But you are making the best of what you got... and so what, a little dark does not hurt the story that you are telling. Keep it up! I am loving it.

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Old 04-13-2012, 02:44 AM   #22
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There is probably about 1 hour of Gopro footage and 2.5 hours of camera footage that I break down to about 10 minutes, you need to capture so much crap to ensure that you get the good stuff. A lot of the time if I am with people I just plonk the camera down and then let it run for 10 minutes, but I might only use 10 seconds of that footage, if that.

You're right, the narrative is really important. Without it, it is next to impossible to keep a story line going and ensure the viewer knows what is happening. I am honing that as I go along. I keep it black and white so that the viewer can distinguish between what is me talking now about what happened in the past and what is actually happening. Sound quality is also an issue. It is easier to record much better quality sound somewhere quiet for the narrative, than it is to try and do it wherever I am on the day. Plus I enjoy telling the stories and I hope that comes through with enthusiasm.

The light is a pain in the ass. In an ideal world I would have a DSLR that could record really high quality footage. However I started with a point and shoot, then I got my hands on a camera designed for video footage, the Panasonic HX DC1, just another small handycam which pulls pretty good footage, you can see the quality improves dramatically after Log 15 - after that everything can be watched in 720p, you just have to increase the quality on Youtube as it defaults to like 360p to ease the load on the servers.

Cheers again, I will get cracking on editing the next one today.
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Old 04-18-2012, 04:22 AM   #23
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AVIGNON-NICE-GENOA-CINQUE TERRE-PISA FEBRUARY 22-24



With Nicole comfortable on the back we head off for Nice. It is the first time that I have had a pillion plus gear on the back of the bike. We are really pushing the bike at about 75% of it's recommended max weight capacity and the handling suffers noticibly. We settle into the road and chat on the intercom. Not wanting to pay for toll roads or pass by the scenery at a pace I set the GPS to avoid tolls. Using google the night before I had checked where a 'no tolls' route would take us. It was up through the mountains going over 1100 metres elevation. After checking the temperature forecast along the way I decided the mountains would be ok so long as we got through in the peak of the day.



We head towards Apt through vineyards and rustic farm houses. The sun shines golden on everything that is dry and brown from winter. A sense of warmth and optimism is created by the colours, overpowering the 8 degree air that blows through us. Rows of trees line the roads as is typical in this area and the sun flashes through them as we ride by. A beautiful but dangerous custom for motorcyclists.

We stop in Apt to pick up some fruit, olives, fromage and baguette. Nicole is fluent in French which makes everything in France a lot easier.

There are countless opportunities to pull over and take photos but we have to stay disciplined to make it through the mountains. Sometimes you pull the camera out to early and waste your battery then later on in the day when it really gets put on for you, no battery. I don't want that to happen.



A small side road is perfect for us to stop and eat some food. The temperature has risen and it is about 15 degrees so the layers come off and we soak up the sun. It is a perfect day, we are both full of enthusiasm for the weeks ahead. The local produce is rewarding, cheese, olives and wine are so good in this part of the world and a pinch of the cost that we would pay back home so we take the opportunity to dig in.



Back on the bike we head towards the snow capped mountains.



Every time we think the scenery can't get any better it astonishes us again. We are both beaming smiles, every third word is "wow", "woah", "look.. at.. that!". The tarmac is perfectly smooth, maintained and massive rock faces rise up on either side of the road. We follows a river that carves it's way through thick snow and to my surprise the temperature remains above 12 degrees despite the 100's of metres we gain in elevation.



We stop at an old train station that looks as though it may still get some use. There is a huge pile of snow and after a photo with the bike I can't resist spinning up the rear.



Up we climb and the road starts to carve into the cliff face, dropping off a hundred metres to one side. I am really enjoying the turns and the bike still has plenty of power despite the 175kg load. We pass through a giant hole cut out of the mountain face as we reach the top of the range at about 1000m.

We realise how lucky we are to be seeing this spectacle at this height. 2 weeks ago the temperature would have forbid us coming even close when temperatures were -10c. Today the temperature is perfect. In another 2 weeks all this snow will melt and the landscape won't be the winter wonderland it is today.





After riding past snow fields we decent around 20 hairpin turns to Castellane. The whole time we can see this church on the edge of a cliff overlooking the city. Nicole is eager to stop to get photos.



We climb again to elevation and have the choice between a route to Cannes or direct to Nice, our destination for the evening. Cannes it is. Our whole afternoon is winding roads up and down, around through the mountain range until late afternoon we finally peak through and can see the meditteranean for the first time. Like someone had flicked a switch the vegetation went from alpine to tropical. Palm trees line the roads. The houses are painted the typical meditteranean colours, ochres, madarins, maroons.



In Cannes we stop for a snack, crepes with nutella, as we watch old men play bocce in the park.



It is just after 5ish and the sun is starting to set, we pull over to take photos. It is up there with one of the best sunsets I have seen.
Carnavale is on and what was meant to be about an hour drive to Nice takes two. Finally we arrive, find a hostel and a safe place to chain up the bike before getting some cheap chinese food and pastries.



In the morning we say goodbye to Nice and head towards Italy. The sun is shining bright and warm. As we leave the city we climb up a hill to the east that gives us a pretty stunning view.



Following the coastline we take the scenic route. The road winds along the mountains that run into the ocean. It is busy with scooters constantly flying past and road works along the route. We are not making very good time but it doesn't really matter. Today is going to be a big day with about 5-6 hours riding on the bike. We got away from Nice around 10am and so hoping to get to Genoa by about 6:30pm.









Monaco is along the way and I have always wanted to see it so we stop through for a coffee at a little cafe called le Bambi. A lot of super yachts dock here. I have heard my friend Renee back home talk about working on the super yachts. Apparently it is a pretty good gig. There are 4 mid twenties sitting at a table next to us. A couple of british and maybe some Americans. One struggles with a "sil vous plait, one coffee please" to the waiter who responds in perfect english "One coffee for you." They are talking about what I can only assume is the owner of the yacht, who by the conversation, had a huge party the night before, leaving the yacht a mess and they had to clean it all up.



Not long after and we are at the border to Italy.



WE'RE IN ITALY!

There is a marked difference between ether side of the border. Immediately everything looks more disorganised, rustic, random, rough. I like it. I wait for the driving to get worse. Reportedly the Italians care very little for rules on the road.



The first thing I notice about the roads is the scooters. They are everywhere. I mean, they were there in France but here they are in droves, everywhere... they fly around the traffic, weaving in and out. You have to shoulder check every time you reposition the bike to make sure a scooter isn't about to fly past you.

Cars are not indicating, everyone is trying to cut corners to get ahead but somehow it works and I find my groove.





We stop for lunch on the beach. It is quiet apart from a man reading a book near us.



Half way through our lunch a plane flies low, directly over our heads.



We watch as it lands in the water.



5 minutes later the same plane goes past again.



It takes us a few times to realise that the plane is picking up seawater and flying it to a bush fire in the hills behind us. We notice two planes and a helicopter all working on the fire. People start to leave their houses to watch and the street gets busier.



We look fairly conspicuous and have bee getting our fair share of stares and attention. You can see in this photo the hand out the window on the left giving us the wave. They beeped and carried on when they went past us.



The night before we wrote down a few possible places to stay in Genoa. I am trying to preserve cash and I have suggested that we camp along the way. There are a lot of campsites on the maps and we have already passed many since leaving Nice. It is starting to get dark and we have been on the road a few hours since lunch. We see a campsite about half an hour from Genoa and stop in to enquire. Nicole hops off the bike to ask and I can hear her try to struggle a conversation in Italian. She comes back to the bike. They want 25 euros for us, the bike and the tent - each item gets a separate charge. I am used to paying maybe 5 euros a night for camping back in Australia. Cosidering we can stay in a hostel for 16 euros each, making it only 7 euro more expensive - we opt for the hostel.

It is completely dark by the time we near Genoa. I have the hostel address punched into the gps. Traffic is hectic and I am weaving and avoiding the whole way. We pass shipping yards and a port. They must run a lot of ferries into the mediterranean out of here. Completely slave to the GPS we start weaving back and forth up a hill. I come around a hairpin corner and a bus is coming straight for us. My instict pulls the bike to the left, to where the left lane would be and I have to fight it and pull quickly back to the right. The bus beeps and my stomach turns as our margin for error was very thin.

We get to the hostel at the top of the hill. It's an old school looking building with a view over the whole city. The Hostel is part of the 'Hostelling international' chain. It was my first experience with the chain and I wasn't impressed. First thing we were told that there were no shared dorms and that we would have to sleep in separate dorm rooms on different floors. It is handy being in the same room, you can watch over eachothers stuff while the other person showers etc. They also charged us 3 euro extra to buy a membership card for 'hostelling international', which is a bit of a sham as this is compulsory but not advertised online. In all the place was overpriced and felt like a hospital. Not much we could do though as it was the only hostel in the city. In retrospect, and for those ever in Genoa looking for cheap accommodation you would be better off paying the extra 5 euro and staying in a b&b. This Hostelling International comes from a time when YHA's and so forth required membership and were run like glorified school camps. Hostels have changed a lot since then except where competition is scarce. Enough whinging, back to the good stuff.



Our plan for today is to see the Cinque Terre and then make it to Pisa where we found a very cheap hostel online with good reviews.



Our route takes us straight back down the hill that we came up the night before. Genoa has a very industrial feel to it with everything built up the sides of the mountains by the sea. Massive viaducts cross overhead, it is the autoroute. The beamer display is telling me I only have 12 miles to go until I need to refill the bike and we are heading through the mountains. I search for fuel stops in the GPS and fine one about 20 k's away. This is becoming a habit for me as the range on the bike is only about 300k's and I keep trying to push it to the end each time to reduce the number of fuel stops we have to make. With only a couple of miles left on the hud we fill up with gas.

The woman at the hostel had told us that we would be able to ride into Riomaggiore from the north and the road was open. In october last year there was devastating flood through the area which destroyed a lot of buildings and roads in the cinque terre. You can see some pretty insan footage here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DAuXFUx9r8 It was hard to get reliable up to date news about what parts of the area were open so our plan was just to go there and find out.



We ride through the mountains which follow the coastline. It's a touch cold as we climb high but the sun is shining bright and the views straight out to the ocean are brilliant.



After a stop for some food we reach a fork in the road and a sign that says Strada Chiusa.

We knew that Strada meant road, but what the fuck does Chiusa mean?

Logic and the interpretation of a red circle crossed in the middle planted right in the middle of the road would suggest it means closed. However our unbridled optimism and eagerness to see Cinque Terre has us searching our Italian travel phrase book for the word chiusa. A little 3 wheel piaggio comes past us with an old couple inside. We struggle a few phrases but the basic gist is that we have to go all the way around to La Spezia and come in the back way to get to Riomaggiore.

Just a sidenote on the 3 wheel Piaggios, these things are everywhere in Italy. A lot of farmers, builders and labourers in general use them to move their goods around. Originally they were just vespas with an extra wheel on the back and a tray but they have evolved into these things today. Unfortunately I didn't get a photo at the time and can't really see where to find any online. Either way, here is what they look like courtesy of wikipedia.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...F.dsc01304.jpg



I play with the GPS to find the route we need to go consulting with Nicole. It is going to mean we won't get into Pisa until 7:30-8:00ish. We agree it's fine and we take a back road which is a little worse for wear and hasn't been repaired since the flooding.



We arrive at Riomaggiore and start the walk along the Cinque Terre, we are going to try and see 3 of the 5 towns in the day.


Riomaggiore.

I am going to put in a fair few photos that Nicole took here because I think they are all great.


This must be a very 'romantic' thing to do. All along the walk couples have scrawled their names and initials on any possible surface. Even on plant leaves.

I think the idea here, which is becoming overdone in a lot of places, is to put your initials on a padlock and those of your partner. You lock the padlock somewhere and throw away the key. I had seen this on a bridge in Cologne 3 months prior. I read an article that in Dublin they had to remove them from the halfpenny bridge because so many had accumulated and were putting the structural integrity of the bridge at risk from the extra weight. The trend is everywhere over Europe and in Italy is gaining popularity here.




We get to Manarola where they are rebuilding still after the floods but most of it is back to normal. We stop for what is, brilliant and cheap coffee with tourist-priced gelati.





On the way back it must be that time of the day and all the older Cinque Terrians are out and about going for walks and sitting watching the sea. The women are knitting and then men are chatting and smoking.







As we are riding to Pisa the GPS takes us all the way to the end of a peninsula thinking that we can cross a bridge back to the mainland. The bridge is closed. It takes us another 45 minutes to get back around and so by the time we get through Viareggio and on to Pisa it is dark and cold. It drops down to 6 degrees and I have less warm gear on than normal. Nicole has her arms wrapped tightly around me though, keeping me warm and our conversation distracts me from how bloody cold it is. We finally make it into Pisa about half 8 and settle into our hostel for the night.
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Old 04-18-2012, 02:49 PM   #24
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Great video of Ireland mate, but you missed out the Donegal coastline and the Rosses. I don't blame you really as the weather looked a tad chilly. Just back myself after a few weeks in Donegal, the first week being cold and showery, but the second sunny almost every day.
Your journey through Nice and Monaco reminded me of a holiday we had there a few years ago, the Cote D'Azure is so scenic.
Those Italian 3 wheelers are called "Apes" and pronounced "Arpays" in Italian, great little work horses.
Look forward to some more video footage and images. Stay safe and enjoy the moment as I do when reading your blog and others whilst on lunch break at work.
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Old 04-29-2012, 12:13 PM   #25
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Cheers, yeah I was running low on time and it sort of came down to having a place to couchsurf in Letterkenny and it being so bloody cold.

Are you doing up a ride report at all? I have been flat chat for 2 weeks at this horse ranch I am working at in Spain. Only getting time now to edit together the next video log.
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Old 05-04-2012, 09:35 AM   #26
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Hi I just found your report ,enjoyed the videos. maybe a bit premature but if you make it to El Paso Texas U.S.A. let me know I have tent space and a shower.A little Local knowledge.
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Old 05-06-2012, 11:38 PM   #27
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What a great job you are doing my friend, nice videos & huge effort. Enjoy your time
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:01 AM   #28
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Hi I just found your report ,enjoyed the videos. maybe a bit premature but if you make it to El Paso Texas U.S.A. let me know I have tent space and a shower.A little Local knowledge.
Not a matter of if, only a matter of when. Would be awesome, cheers.

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What a great job you are doing my friend, nice videos & huge effort. Enjoy your time
Cheers for the feedback guys, appreciate it.

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Old 05-08-2012, 04:03 AM   #29
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Here is the latest one, grab a beer or a coffee and check it out :) Let me know what you think?

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Old 05-12-2012, 09:38 AM   #30
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Pisa-lucca-pistoia - february 25-26

PISA-LUCCA-PISTOIA



It is Saturday and we awake in Pisa. Our plans is to get to Pistoia, a town an hour from Florence and about 2 hours from Pisa. The night before, or maybe it was the one before that, we had confirmed with a Couchsurfer by the name of Alice to spend the weekend with her and her friends in Pistoia. Being in Pisa and only having a couple of hours there is only one, obligatory thing to do.



I had seen so many pictures of the Tower of Pisa in the past it was mostly just a trip to confirm that it had existed and tick the box to say I had seen it. Travelling has become a bit of a process;

Step 1: Decide on a country to go to.
Step 2: Google 'Things to do and see in 'country x'
Step 3: Find things that look interesting or amazing.
Step 4: See them in real life.

To be honest, this has been the process and I have found it does not entirely fulfill me. Maybe that is why I ride a motorbike. For me, it is less about the destination, but the way and the means. I like that I can look at a map and I know what the country looks like in the area. Flying into a city gives you no context of where that city sits in or the culture it draws on and permeates into the area surrounding. Like the Faithless song, I want more. I want to find things I wasn't expecting. I want to meet people that teach me new things. I want to expand the cup and not just fill it. Little did I know I was about to have one of the best travel experiences of my life that weekend.

I digress, back to Pisa. I doubt anyone reading this has not seen the tower, so I won't put any pictures up of it (solely). We have packed up everything onto the bike. As we circle the block we can see it popping out over buildings in our view. I think I accidentally double-dosed on my medication the night prior and I am feeling a little buzzed. We get a park a short walk from the tower. What you generally don't see in pictures of Pisa is the giant cathedrals or dumos next to the tower. I was expecting the tower to just stand out in the middle of a grassy patch with nothing else. Tourists are everywhere and I can smell freshly baked patries and coffee. Two patries down the hatch while I look at the kitsch souvenirs for sale in stalls that line all the side streets to the tower. It is the same mass produced souvenirs you see around the world. I heart PISA shirts and coffee mugs shaped on a slant like the tower itself.



There is a constant line of people taking photos to make themselves appear to be holding up or pushing over the tower of pisa. I find it more interesting to take photos of them, than the tower itself.


Lucca.

We leave Pisa and head towards Pistoia via Lucca having heard good things about the latter. After finding a spot to lock up the bike we go in search of coffee. The key is to try and find somewhere that isn't in the main tourist area. The logic being that it will be cheaper and that if it is where the locals go then they will have to work harder and make better coffee to get the business. I have one of those moments where you think you have forgotten to put the alarm on the bike on, paranoia gets the better of me and I go back to check. It's fine and when I return Nicole has struck up a conversation with a couple, they are from Australia and have been living in Lucca for over a year. They recommend a few places to go and we find coffee for 1 Euro.



It is by far the best coffee I have had on this side of the world. I have Nicole to blame for this as she worked for a coffee distributor in Australia and literally wrote a book on how to make good coffee. So when a coffee is bad, she explains to me why, like the beans have been overburnt, the milk is too watery. As a result my brain is now finely tuned to pick up subtle differences in coffee - that's right, I have become a coffee snob. I mean, I will still drink a nescafe instant for the caffeine fix but I enjoy a well made coffee.

A bit of a walk around the walls of Lucca and we are back on the road to Pistoia. As it is Saturday there are motorbikes everywhere. It has fnally warmed up enough for the Italians to get their bikes out and they love it. Everyone is friendly, waving to us on the bike and beeping their horns when they see that we have GB plates on.

We finally reach the train station in Pistoia and wait for Alice, pronounced A-lee-chay, to come and get us. She turns up with a huge smile on her face and we get the cheek kisses that are a standard greeting in this part of the world. That is between men and women, women and women, but men and men shake hands.

Couchsurfing is the sort of thing where you kind of have to just go with the flow. People approach it differently but I think it is most rewarding when you spend a lot of the time with the host. If you want all the time free to yourself to explore, couchsurfing is not really for you, pay $10 and get a hostel. So Alice told us that she was going to take us to a folk dancing event that night, then a BBQ the next day followed by swing dancing the next night. That was fine by us, so long as we could get a nap on the couch beforehand. Alice's boyfriend Lorenzo turns up and starts cooking up an Italian pasta for all of us. We chat about the time that Alice went and toured around Australia. Alice and Nicole get along really well, both with an artistic bent, they have a lot in common.



After a fantastic meal we head out to go folk dancing. I don't know what to expect. We turn up to what looks like some sort of community club. There are a couple of guys on a stage drinking and playing what looks like an accordion. Alice and Lorenzo know a few people there and get into the dancing fairly quickly. Nicole and I step back and watch for a bit. After a few songs Lorenzo grabs Nicole for a dance and I fight off Sara, one of Alice's friends who is trying to drag me onto the dance floor.


Nicole and Lorenzo.


Sara dancing on the right.

A group circle dancing song comes on, looks like something I could handle and so I jump in. I try and follow the steps of the others in the circle but it doesn't take long to realise nobody knows the actual steps and it's all a bit of improvisation.

It's a great night in the end, desite having no alcohol I manage to dance for a few hours.


The bike chained to a fence across the road from Alices apartment.

The next day we spend half the morning sleeping. After midday we head out for a BBQ at a friend of Alice's. Apparently they organise these BBQ's about once a month and everyone puts in 5 euro to help pay for the copious amounts of food and wine. The car winds up through the Tuscan hills until we reach a spot we have to walk from.



We arrive at a farmhouse that is built into the side of the mountain. A 20 metre long table sits a handfull of people drinking wine, we can smell the olive groves, lavender and wood burning on the fire. Everyone is smiling and laughing, the sun is shining warmth onto everything and everyone.


Everyone plays fetch with the two farm dogs.


Meat cooking on the BBQ, Italian style.


More people start to arrive, eventually around 50 people turn up for the BBQ.


Alice, our CS host and now friend, writes our names on cups so we can all start consuming the Italian wine.


Wine is drunk from a jug.


Bread always plays a big part in Italian meals, especially for Scarpetta - the practice of wiping ones plate clean with bread when finished a meal.


The pasta is finally finished and everyone is all smiles. It was great, this Italian guy was smiling and yelling as he served up everyone their pasta for lunch.


Everyone digs in for lunch.


Nicole is a happy camper.


Everyone is toasting as a couple at the BBQ have announced that they are going to have a baby. The bald guy sitting next to Nicole, we are told later, is a famous Italian soccer player.


After lunch we all headed up to a soccer pitch they had cut out on the hill above the house or a game of soccer.


Running into a group hug and celebration when we scored.


Relaxing afterwards and watching the sun set.


Nicole taking a nap on the grass.

Later that evening Alice took us to their weekly Sunday night swing dance session. Alice tells me that swing dancing is becoming very popular in Italy among the mid-twenties.


Nicole and I trying to learn the moves.


The instructor showing everyone how it is done.

A panini and a beer after the dancing and then it was bedtime for us. We got up the next morning to head to Florence. In all our stay with Alice was one of the best travel experiences I have had. It was simple but we just felt like we had experienced a slice of this Italian life, something that normal tourism can't offer. It was much better than just seeing statues and art galleries. I like this couchsurfing thing and plan to do a lot more of it in my travels.
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