ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-22-2012, 04:50 PM   #31
Ruan
Adventurer to be
 
Ruan's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Portugal
Oddometer: 78
Very nice trip Jet...
__________________
com4riding.blogspot.com

Portugal to Andorra in 1984
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=817041
Ruan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 12:47 AM   #32
jetjackson OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
jetjackson's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Somewhere in Europe on a Motorbike :)
Oddometer: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruan View Post
Very nice trip Jet...
Cheers mate...

After a bit of a hiatus here is the latest video blog. I have spent about 40 hours editing this one and have put together a new intro so hope you like it.


jetjackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 08:25 AM   #33
BELSTAFF
ADV NOMAD
 
BELSTAFF's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Arizona--Land of the free and heavly armed
Oddometer: 1,090
In a word

OUTSTANDING !!!!!!!


loving ever minute of this--- keep it coming
__________________
"WIND CALLS THE HEART,ADVENTURE BEGINS"

Arizona OHV Ambassador
BELSTAFF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 11:57 AM   #34
jmcg
Turpinated..
 
jmcg's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: The Dandenong Ranges, Vic
Oddometer: 439
Really enjoying the videos and report.

Great work.

Safe travels.

Cheers,

JM.
jmcg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 07:31 AM   #35
jetjackson OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
jetjackson's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Somewhere in Europe on a Motorbike :)
Oddometer: 490
Monday 27th Feb - 4th March - FLORENCE - SAN GIMIGNANO - SIENA - PERUGIA - MATERA

Monday 27th Feb - 4th March - FLORENCE - SAN GIMIGNANO - SIENA - PERUGIA - MATERA



It was all hugs and smiles as we said good bye to Alice in the morning before she headed off for work. We headed on for Florence where we have a pension booked. When we finally find it we are greeted by this elderley Italian man, big guy with a big smile but not much english. He shows us the room, it is in the side of their house. Pictures of his sons achievements line the walls of the dining room and there are plenty of old knick knacks in display cases around the room. The sort that only have value to the person who understands the significance.



Scooters are like ants, lining the streets, weaving in and out of any open space on the road.



We are smack in the centre of the city and head towards the Duomo, Italiano for Cathedral, at the centre of the city.



Green marble, burnt orange tile rooftops are typical of the region but this is by far the biggest Duomo we have seen.



Inside the Duomo the cieling rises up, belittleling, almost intimidating in grandeur. Nicole and I discuss religion. It's not a fiery discussion, we're both Athiests, myself slightly harder line but not the type to push my views on others. I try to imagine what this building would have felt like 300 years prior, before the high rise buildings and feats of engineering we know today. A feeling of awe, work that only devine intervention could inspire, conveying the a similar authority of our modern skyscrapers.



There are a few things you have to take advantage of in Italy. Pizza and Gelati!



We take a walk in the afternoon to see the Ponte Veggio (old bridge) that, if you have ever seen images of Italy, is likely familiar.

The stores along the bridge mostly sell expensive jewellery with the kind of margins I expect would help pay the lease on what is probably one of the busiest foot bridges in the world.



The sun is reaching the horizon and Nicole takes some great photos.



We sit on an open cement area and soak up the last of the sun rays with the locals.



The next morning it is off to the Uffizi gallery. There are two lines to get in, one for express entry, where you pay 3 times as much to get in straight away without waiting, another about 100 people long, where every 5 minutes they let another 10 people through the door. It is a complete rort. After an hour we enter the gallery to find it practically empty. It reminds me of the pretentious night clubs back home in fortitude valley Brisbane, who force you to wait in line on the street, despite the club being barely half full, in order to give the faux appearance of popularity to passers by. This sort of thing really boils my blood and I loathe myself for participating in it but tell myself it will be worth it.

It's not.

Unless you are overly interested in religion, the catholic religion moreover, and have a knowledge of Boticelli and others I don't remember the names of, it is probably worth skipping. The sculptures and works of art all come from a time when the church funded the majority of artwork. To me it is like reading a Rupert Murdoch newspaper and expecting that it accurately reflects the reality of what actually happened. The best thing about the gallery is the view of the Ponte Veggio from the top floor and only a couple of hidden gems in the east wing, tiny examples of Realism, painted by a woman who was into insects. It's extreme detail you have to see up close. However it didn't make up for waiting an hour in line next to a group of chain smokers.


The view from the top.

That afternoon we take the bike an hour away to a small village, built on a mountain, San Gimignano. It's a walled medievil hill town famous for it's white wine and was once a stopping point for catholic pilgrims on their way to rome, or so says Wikipedia. For me it was a quaint town and we walked around the walls for a bit, taking photos and absorbing the landscape. Steeped in cliche romance it was also a chance to try and kiss Nicole for the first time.



The male pidgeon puffs up to court the lady pidgeon.







I can't say there were not opportune moments but two years of friendship puts a lot of pressure into a situation like this. Logic gets the better of me, what is a few more days on 2 years, I leave it for now.



We ride back into Florence and get some rest. The next day we are headed to Siena and Perugia.



The city centre of Siena is a UNESCO world heritage site and one of the most touristy places in Italy.



A pidgeon paces up and down a wall in the famous Piazza del Campo.

We relax, grab some food, people watch and soak up the sun rays. I head one way on our way out, self-assured in where I am going. It takes longer than it should and we find the city walls. We find an exit and I have no idea where we are, so we start the long walk around the wall to where we parked the bike. We're lost. Well, not lost as such, we know that all we have to do is follow the wall and we will get back to the bike but we have no idea how long that is going to take. About 3k's later we find the bike with a much better understanding of how large and complex Siena actually is.

A couple of hours and one close call with a reckless driver later we are in Perugia. There is a farmhouse that we found on the hostelbookers and we turn up without a booking. In low season, this is the way to go, you know their online price and so chances are you will get a better price on arrival given there is no middleman.



The farm is about 10 minutes out of Perugia and has a great view of the old city. We are starting to wear out after a week on the bike and it is time to recharge the batteries. For 2 days we plan, have a look at the old city, edit video blogs, wash the motorbike and pretty much relax. One place that I am very keen to see is the Saturnia natural springs. Someone on ADV sent me the link and as soon as I saw it I didn't think twice about heading there.

Nicole and I finally kiss. There was no hollywood moment and I will spare any details. We crossed a point where there was no going back, neither of us could deny to either ourselves or eachother what half our friends probably suspected anyway. We didn't talk about it, who likes that conversation anyway, we agreed to leave the hard discussion for later.

It's my Birthday, 28 years old, I spend the morning chatting to the family and friends and then we head off for Saturnia. It is sunny and warm. Birthdays are often a time for reflection and Nicole and I chat about the past and plans for the future, skirting around anything too in depth, speaking in generalities.

We stop at a few camping places along the route to find a place but they are all yet to open for the summer. Even if they were open, they all still want more than 20 euro a night for the two of us. If you are headed to the more isolated places in Italy it becomes harder to find budget accommodation. After coming around a bend we can see the Saturnia springs at the bottom of a hill. It is a relief, I forgot to mention, but there is very little information on the net as to their precise location so we were just heading in the general direction with plans to ask the locals if we got stuck. We stop by them briefly but decide to find accommodation and food before coming back for a proper swim.

There is a campsite nearby but it only caters to RV's with a spot to pump out your toilet, 3 phase power sockets and cement parking spaced. Not suitable for us, a bit of nous around the local town finds us cheap pub style accommodation for the night above a bar.



Finally we get down to the spa for a swim. You can smell the sulfur from half a mile away. We had read about the smell but you gloss over any thoughts of this when you see photos of the place. It is probably the smell as to why this place isn't totally overrun with tourists. That in itself is refreshing. As a tourist, the last place you want to be is where other tourists are. As much as I would like to see myself as more of a traveller, the few days before we had been doing a lot of touristing.



About twenty locals, including a soccer team are soaking up the water. With a constant temperature of 37.5 degrees and an air temperature of about 16 it doesn't take much convincing to get in once you are out of your warm clothes. After ten minutes or so you get used to the smell. The texture below the water ranges from sand to pebbles, to slimy rock. Water pummels out of a gap in some reads at the top of the cascade of springs.

We stay for over an hour, just absorbing the warmth and at one point I get up and try and stand under the gushing water, without much luck.

Afterwards we stink of sulphur, it stays in our clothes and hair, and will last for a good 3 more days.

We get a good nights sleep, our plan for the next day is to hit the auto-route and hammer out a solid 600k's to get down to Matera in the south.

It proves to be a long day on the bike, traffic slows us at various places and it's 130kph the whole way. The highway doesn't provide much eye candy and by the time we get into Matera and navigate our way to the local hostel it is after 7pm. Ditching all our gear and having a shower makes us feel that bit better and we walk out to get some dinner and explore for a bit. We are both impressed with Matera. It was in the film the passion of the christ, I mean I haven't watched that film but I can understand why Gibson filmed it in Matera.



The next morning we get up with enthusiasm to explore. We are on a roll with the good weather. Church bells chime and we start walking around the town. Everything is white stone a lot of it polished from the continual wear of feet over time. It is kind of semi circular with houses built on levels cascading down into a natural ampitheatre overlooking another massive valley. We meander down to the bottom of the ampitheatre and find a tourist information point. They point out across the valley and tell us the cliffs are filled with old churches, tucked away and hidden. We can see a semblance of a path that heads down and we ask about hiking it. One of the women at the centre tell us it is a six hour day and we would need to get a guide. Another tells us that we could probably do it by ourselves. Seasoned hikers, we opt for the latter, it looks quite easy to navigate and she points out roughly where the churches are for us.



We jump a fence that was never built with any serious attempt to stop people crossing over. Carefully we decend into the valley below. We can see groups of young teenagers across the valley.



The views are amazing, every way we look. There is a river to cross and we take our shoes off and jump across.



We head through a few bushes and find the church. It's over 1000 years old according to the locals and there is a fresco almost worn away on the walls inside. The rest is tainted by locals scratching their names into the walls. It's amazing to us that such a historic place would be left so open. History to Australians, I guess, is more of a novel thing as opposed to Italians some of whom literally have Roman ruins in their backyards.



A scout leader comes out of nowhere, it was scout troops that we had seen earlier. He has little english but tells us that wecan see more up on top of the mountain.



We have trouble finding anything until we reach the top and bump into a group of scouts. Most of the speak english and their Scout leader has a keen interest in Archaeology. They invite us to follow them around the cliffs.



Their leader shows us various hidden churches, one with tiles leading up to an alter and he tells us that pilgrims would kneel on the ground and lick the tiles all the way up to the alter, a good 4 metres of tile-licking away. We answer a hundred questions from the scouts who are very interested in our travels and an hour later we say our goodbyes and trek back up to Matera. The scouts have built a makeshift bridge to cross the river and they set it up for us to cross.



Once we get back into the town we spend a bit more time exploring the abandoned houses. Some of them are being rebuilt and you can see how they have been turned into pensions to make the most of the tourism to the area.









A solid storm breaks out and we head back to our hostel. It's our last night in Matera and we go to the pizza place in town recommended to us by the scouts. It's damn good pizza!

jetjackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 10:02 AM   #36
Ganjora
class A bollockser
 
Ganjora's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Oddometer: 146
enjoying your ride report.
enjoying the videos even more.
Ganjora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2012, 11:59 PM   #37
jetjackson OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
jetjackson's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Somewhere in Europe on a Motorbike :)
Oddometer: 490
Monday 5th Mar -11th Mar - Matera - Cilentro - Amalfi - Naples - Rome


Monday 5th Mar -11th Mar - Matera - Cilentro - Amalfi - Naples - Rome



We wake up in Matera and hit the road. We want to get to the Cilentro coast road, suggested by an inmate on ADV to us a few months earlier in planning.

It's a few hours on the road and the GPS loses us for a bit, we ride along some rougher roads past farmers harvesting, well we can't tell what it is, but something.

We have reached a straight road following the coast and we know it heads to some mountains before it gets more interesting. I have heard that this area has quite the mafia presence. There are a lot of hotels and restaurants abandoned and the ones still running look like they have seen better days. I imagine if you are running a business with the mafia around then you are only hampered by your own success. The more money you make the more they take and this might not be, but could be the reason the local businesses look like they have had the life blood sucked out of them. We get alot of stares on the bike, suggesting this is the route less travelled by tourists.

A little further and I am cleaning the visor every minute as we are riding through a cloud of salty sea spray. We hit the Cilentro coastal road and the spray is gone, we are 100 metres above the water on a road cut out of the side of the cliff, weaving in and out of small towns.

So far we have had very little luck with camping on the Italian leg. Camping either costs us 30 euro for a night at which we balk and decline, given that we can stay in a hostel for that price.

Camping grounds start to appear on the side of the beach but most of them appear closed. We finally see one with an open gate and we go in to investigate. There are no guests there, plenty of caravans that appear to stay there through the winter. They are locked up, covered in tarps, everything is packed away. We manage to find a guy who is working on something and with a bit of mime we explain we want to camp for a night. He calls his boss. 10 euro for the night, good for us. So that is how we ended up with a whole camp site to ourselves for a night.



I decided I wanted to go for a bit of a swim but I only got about knee deep before giving up and we sat and watched the sunset.



Making the most of the only lighting in the place at the toilet block to cook up ravioli on the jet boil.



Rain came through in the night, making it great fun for breaking camp in the morning.



The road gets a little rough, not much money is getting spent on this part of Italy.


Rough translation "Shit road, drive slowly"

As we make our way up the coast to Amalfi we start passing women on the side of the road, quite dressed up. It is the strait road to Salerno and I imagine they are catering to the tourists in Amalfi. A husband says to his wife "Honey, just headed out for some milk, might take a couple of hours..."





Before we know it we are riding Amalfi... the roads are busy and it is the quintessential example of risk taking in Italian driving. Cars skirt round us on blind corners for the sake of saving a minute or two on their journey. I had seen the busses take corners here on the tv back home and so knew what to expect. When you hear the horn blasting you stop on the side of the road and wait. Sometimes I have no idea how they get these busses around the corners but somehow they manage. The traffic is bad but not chaotic, the benefit of coming here on the cusp of spring while it is still fairly cold.


Check out the bus taking the corner.

When the traffic clears out and you get the road to yourself the riding is something else. As far as coastal roads go, this is mecca. I have some great footage that I will put in an upcoming video blog, photos just don't do corners justice.

Agerola is our stop for the night, it is high up on the mountain and we plan to stay there a couple of days at least. We find a good hostel and settle in for the night. I may not have mentioned it yet but I have secured a volunteer job at a horse ranch in Spain. I need a bit of a break from travel for a bit and am keen to put my 2 years of Spanish study to use. The plan is to go back and stay with Nicole for a week and then head down to the Catalonian mountains where I will stay for 4 or 5 months. The plan, at this stage at least, is still a little vague. Things have changed with Nicole but we haven't worked out what we are going to do yet and we have agreed to not have that conversation, at least for now.

We are now two and a half weeks into our 3 week trip. It is almost over but neither of us wants to think about that yet and we take a hike into Amalfi. We are at around 600m above sea level, and we need to walk down to sea level. The hike we have to take is known for its steps, 900 odd steps. Going down steps sounds easy and for the part it seems easy but after about 300 steps you notice that your stabalising muscles in your legs are working overtime to stop your knees from buckling with each step.




Stopping for a rest on the walk down the stairs.



Amalfi is as to be expected, an overpriced tourist trap. Take away everything and you are left with a really beautiful part of the world so you just have to ignore the 20 euro price tag for a pizza and garlic bread and try and enjoy where you are. There is no way we are hiking back up the hill and so we hop on the bus and experience the road from the other side. On the bus you are quite high off the road and you an easily see over the edge of the road barriers. It's a nice change to be able to enjoy the view without worrying about focussing on the road.


The sun is setting when we get back to the top at Agerola.

Our plan from here is to head further north to Rome where Nicole will fly back to Avignon to get back to her job teaching english. I will head north after that to San Marino, the Ducati museum in Bologna and then slowly make my way back up to Nicole's place in Avignon.

The destination today is Naples, home of Pizza and the supposed mafia capital of Italy. However disaster has struck. I went to plug in my digital camera to charge and the thing stopped working. I take it apart to check for loose wires but everything is miniaturised and I can't tell what is wrong with it. Realistically I know that I have little chance of fixing it but with only the fisheye of the gopro to take photos and footage the attempts to fix the camera are more an attempt at getting past the Kubler-Ross stage of denial. A new camera is out of my budget so most of the photos will stop here, at least until I can find a solution.

The riding today is equally as thrilling as the days before and the further we get away from Amalfi the lighter the traffic gets, meaning I can really lean the bike into the corners.

That afternoon we arrive into Naples. It's rough. Rustic. My street-smart senses can tell it is the sort of place where you need to watch yourself. Traffic is insane, there are no rules, cars are literally weaving into the tram lanes (tram lanes that are isolated by 6 inch high cement gutters mind you) to get ahead in the traffic. "Fuck off to your own country" or something to that effect is yelled out as I am stopped at a light. It is the first bit of hostility I have come across in Italy but easily ignored. At our hostel we find a safe spot in a hallway to park the bike.

There really isn't that much time for us to explore Naples. At this stage the journeysin teh day are enough for me. Nicole has seen Naples before and we need to get to Rome so Rome it is.

It is our second last day together before Nicole flys back to Avignon. We will only be apart for a few days but have become quite used to eachothers company.

The ride to Rome is all filler. We crank out the ks to get there. As we get into Rome I capture a guy on a GSA giving us the wave.



We have been getting a lot of waves from the local riders, especially when they see the British number plates. I wish I had have brought an Aussie flag or something for the bike. Although sometimes you want to attract less attention.



Another rider flies past us in some of the most reckless riding I have ever seen on the road. He is doing at least 90 in a 50 zone weaving through the traffic. As he passes us he turns around to have a second look at us, whilst turning to overtake another car.

That night we check out the main sites in rome. It's nice but the one thing I see that fully takes my attention is a fully black F800GS with the reverse forks and virtually all the parts exchanged for carbon fibre. Yet I don't have a camera to take a photo.


Trevi fountain by night.

The next morning I say good bye to Nicole. She heads for the bus and I punch in the coordinates for San Marino and Bologna. Heading off solo again for the first time in a month.
jetjackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2012, 09:56 AM   #38
jetjackson OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
jetjackson's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Somewhere in Europe on a Motorbike :)
Oddometer: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by BELSTAFF View Post
OUTSTANDING !!!!!!!


loving ever minute of this--- keep it coming
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmcg View Post
Really enjoying the videos and report.

Great work.

Safe travels.

Cheers,

JM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganjora View Post
enjoying your ride report.
enjoying the videos even more.
Cheers guys, in Istanbul at the moment and working on the next one. It's really hard to edit each one while I am on the road, chances are I will only manage to get about 1-2 a month done for the next 4 or 5 months, then I will have another big break where I will get a chance to punch them out every week or two.
jetjackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2012, 04:47 AM   #39
potski
Wiley Wanderer
 
potski's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: In the mountains
Oddometer: 506
Hi
Fantastic stuff, really enjoying your full of life RR and Vid's..keep em coming.

Must say you were really unlucky weather wise.

I was brought up in the North of England; mate, you need some protection, a screen or something if your gonna tangle with that kind of weather.... came to my senses in the end and am now living SW France

Ride safe

Subscribed?.....you bet.

Cheers
Potski
__________________
Show us your best ever Transalp photos/videos here and Potski Films here & here
"Don't wait for your ship to come in, swim out and meet the bloody thing" Barry Sheen
potski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2012, 10:40 AM   #40
2WheelieADV
Gnarly Adventurer
 
2WheelieADV's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: NJ
Oddometer: 329
Just an AMAZING report!! Much pleasure to read and view such a good photos. Thank you for taking us along.
2WheelieADV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2012, 03:31 AM   #41
nicola_a
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Melbourne, AU
Oddometer: 55
This is an amazing report!!! I can't wait to read more. Such wonderful photos, and you write really wonderfully. You should write a book1
nicola_a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2012, 03:46 AM   #42
potski
Wiley Wanderer
 
potski's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: In the mountains
Oddometer: 506
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicola_a View Post
This is an amazing report!!! I can't wait to read more. Such wonderful photos, and you write really wonderfully. You should write a book1

+1 We want more

Come on Jet your public awaits.

Ride safe..
Cheers
Potski
__________________
Show us your best ever Transalp photos/videos here and Potski Films here & here
"Don't wait for your ship to come in, swim out and meet the bloody thing" Barry Sheen
potski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 03:17 PM   #43
jetjackson OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
jetjackson's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Somewhere in Europe on a Motorbike :)
Oddometer: 490
Sorry on the delays guys... Appreciate the feedback :)

I am filming literally every day at the moment. I have some awesome footage in the bag and some crazy things have happened over the past few months. It's just been exhausting and I am almost finished editing the latest video blog... once that is in I will start writing more of the reports.

I haven't given up, I assure you. After November I will have a bit more time to start flying them out the door, and fingers crossed I will have access to a much more powerful computer that I will be able to edit a lot faster on.
jetjackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 04:30 PM   #44
nicola_a
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Melbourne, AU
Oddometer: 55
Hey Jet

This is an incredible ride report and I reckon when you come home, you will have such amazing records of your trip that you'll end up on TV (perhaps with your own mini travel series!). Wonderful.

I'm thinking of doing exactly the same thing (as are many people on ADV I guess). I have a couple of questions --

Do you carry camping gear with you?
Do you stay in hostels each night?
What is your daily budget?
Do you have work you do whilst travelling or did you save up cash before leaving?
What are your essential/most useful items (apart from your cameras of course!)?

Also, I grew up in BrisVegas! Haha. Live in Melbourne now though.

Take care and safe travels.
nicola_a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 01:17 AM   #45
jetjackson OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
jetjackson's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Somewhere in Europe on a Motorbike :)
Oddometer: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicola_a View Post
Hey Jet

This is an incredible ride report and I reckon when you come home, you will have such amazing records of your trip that you'll end up on TV (perhaps with your own mini travel series!). Wonderful.

I'm thinking of doing exactly the same thing (as are many people on ADV I guess). I have a couple of questions --

Do you carry camping gear with you?
Do you stay in hostels each night?
What is your daily budget?
Do you have work you do whilst travelling or did you save up cash before leaving?
What are your essential/most useful items (apart from your cameras of course!)?

Also, I grew up in BrisVegas! Haha. Live in Melbourne now though.

Take care and safe travels.
Heh heh, Cheers Nicola.

The footage I have is mostly filmed in 720p, not high enough res for television unfortunately. I have already racked up about 700 Gigabytes of footage. If I was filming in 1080p then I would have about 5 Terabytes of data by now and would have to carry around about 5 external hard drives with me... for that reason I am sticking with 720p, which is enough for youtube. TBH I don't know if I would want to be on TV, happy enough just sharing with people online.

I carry camping gear - I think that is really important, helps you keep your budget down and also gives you a back-up option in case things go wrong, such as a break down in the middle of nowhere, you can think a lot more clearly when you break down if you have everything you need to survive a couple of days there (food/camping gear). Plus you don't have to be as organised with accommodation. If you turn up to a city only to find that all the hostels are full, you can at least camp... a lot of hostels will let you camp in their yard if they have one. Which takes me to the next point.

I camp/hostel and have only stayed in a hotel once and a couple of motels in Eastern Europe where it cost about 20 euro or less for the night. I have a budget where I don't have to camp unless I want to, but if I do camp it saves me money. I think this is the best approach, saves you money. So I will camp if it is somewhere really cool, like on a beach, up in the mountains, in a forest but I would rather stay in a hostel than camp in the industrial area of a city just for the sake of saving money. In Western europe camping is not necessarily cheaper than a hostel anyway. Sometimes it will cost 25 euro to camp, when you can stay in a hostel for 30 euro - so its worth the extra 5 euro to save the time making/breaking camp that you could be spending exploring. The European idea of camping is a bit different to ours - they think that taking a caravan to a camp site for 2 weeks is camping - in my mind it isn't. But that means that their camp sites are more set up for caravan tourists and priced that way too.

Hostels are the go, they help you meet people and also nearly always have internet, which helps you plan the next days/weeks of your trip while you are on the go.

Daily budget - not including fuel/bike maintenance is 20 euro per day in Eastern Europe - this was quite doable - you can still stay in hostels and the occasional motel and eat in restaurants twice a day and stay under the 20 euro budget.
Western Europe it is around 30 euro per day, however to maintain a 30 euro per day average means self-catering more often by cooking your own meals in hostels, and also couch-surfing maybe once a week and camping where you can for free (maybe once or twice a week).

I saved up all the money before I left and then quit my job. I have done volunteering work along the way in exchange for free food/accommodation - this has helped me stretch my budget.

My most essential items - warm sleeping bags that can go down to 0 degrees - I would have frozen if not for that. I have these BMW raingear overalls - you need rain overalls if you are going to stay dry, a two piece kit will always result in a wet crouch if it rains hard enough. You can see that in my gear section - I should do a few more actually.

Other pieces of kit that have made my travels easier.

- Thermarest Neoair - this mattress packs down tiny, yet blows up really thick with about 25 breaths. I am a side sleeper and so it means when I go camping I wake up without a sore back. If not for this I would then have to hop on the bike with a sore back and ride all day which would only make it worse.

- Jetboil - a gas boiler for water and cooking - you need one of these but in retrospect I would go for the MSR setup which allows you to use any fuel you want.

- Pacsafes - I have a 120L pacsafe that I can put my main duffel bag into in hostels or use it to lock the bag to the motorbike. I also have a pacsafe backpack which has wire in all the straps to prevent slash and grab robberies -although these are only more common in south america and I have not come across any of these types of attacks yet. That bag also comes with a pacsafe, like a bag with wire all the way through it that I can use to lock up my stuff in hostels. They cost over $200 for everything but well worth it.

The camera setup I have is basic and I have to push it to the limits to get the results I get... when I get home I plan on buying a much better setup so I can continue to make riding videos but at a much higher quality.

My brother moved to Melbs a few years ago, he likes it down there and I am struggling to convince him to come back to Brisbane.
jetjackson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014