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Old 08-17-2014, 07:07 PM   #1
Gh0zt36 OP
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Stihl 044 3-wheel bicycle

Ok , So I'm going to start this project here . I got a 3 wheeler and a still 044 chainsaw which is 75cc 2 smoke motor .

I picked it cause it has a built in centrifugal clutch . So I was trying to figure out a drive system and I was trying figure out sprocket sizes for the chain drive I'm going to use and I'm at a loss trying to figure a way to affix a gear onto the saw rotor .

This is the drive plate on the saw I got to work with . Any ideas?

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Old 08-17-2014, 08:08 PM   #2
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Do you know the RPM range of the saw engine and at what RPM the clutch engages? That'll help you figure out your sprocket ratios. Once there, then have a machine shop make an engine sprocket for you.
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Old 08-18-2014, 03:38 AM   #3
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www.motoredbikes.com <--- these guys build stuff like that. Once you can get past the asshats who just tell you to give up and buy the $700 Eagle kit and the others who suggest a cheaper HT frame mount kit from ebay, and the ones who whine and cry about how the HT kit will die and kill you in 30 miles...


...Some things to consider: If you are going to try and run a setup with two sprockets, and one chain, you are going to find that the driven sprocket (On the wheel) will need to be just a little smaller than the wheel itself. You will likely need to run a jackshaft to get the proper ratio without needing absurdly large sprockets. I second Troidus in getting a machine shop to make a sprocket for you for the engine side. Another option is to see if you have a fabrication shop with a laser cutter near you. They may be able to make a sprocket cheaper than a machine shop could.
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Old 08-18-2014, 06:08 AM   #4
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Find a smallish bicycle chain sprocket and weld the chainsaw drive sprocket in the center.. done. Gonna need a very large wheel sprocket to get the RPM's even remotely in the right neighborhood. A small jackshaft reduction is an option as well.
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Old 08-18-2014, 08:53 AM   #5
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Find a smallish bicycle chain sprocket and weld the chainsaw drive sprocket in the center.. done. Gonna need a very large wheel sprocket to get the RPM's even remotely in the right neighborhood. A small jackshaft reduction is an option as well.
Sooo many years ago that's how I powered my soap box derby car with a cheap chainsaw motor. Sure needed the jackstaff reduction even with that old saw that wasn't anywhere close to the 10-11,000 Rpms of a Stihl 044.

Noisy....didn't make the neighbor's too happy.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:26 AM   #6
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Not cheap but there are freewheel chainrings on offer, then just run power into the cassette but chainsaw rotation must be considered first, then a jackshaft comes into play.

IIRC, Golden Eagle uses 13 to 150+ in the reduction. Staton offers a reduction gearbox, heavy though.
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:10 PM   #7
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14k rpm in the top end clutch engages at about 700 maybe . Ill have to look into this jackshaft business. . I was thinking 14t sprocket for the inline gear on the chain cause the bikes own sprockets should do drive ratio .

I was thinking relatively small sprocket to crank RPMs and put it inline with the native chain and sprockets on the bike already . This way a single drive sprocket may be an easier task to accomplish. and just hump the chain over top of that sprocket . sucks there are 7 notches on the saw drive gear and there are 6 on bicycle sprockets . it almost woulda been a plug and play cept for the welding.
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Old 08-18-2014, 05:36 PM   #8
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14k rpm in the top end clutch engages at about 700 maybe . Ill have to look into this jackshaft business. . I was thinking 14t sprocket for the inline gear on the chain cause the bikes own sprockets should do drive ratio .

I was thinking relatively small sprocket to crank RPMs and put it inline with the native chain and sprockets on the bike already . This way a single drive sprocket may be an easier task to accomplish. and just hump the chain over top of that sprocket . sucks there are 7 notches on the saw drive gear and there are 6 on bicycle sprockets . it almost woulda been a plug and play cept for the welding.
That clutch engages at 3800RPM. However, that engine makes little usefull power until 8-9000 RPM. The gearing you are mentioning is waaaaayyyyy too tall. That clutch is meant to engage with no load, NOT to start a load, it will quickly wear out. So, to have that work even slightly well, you need to gear it down. A lot.
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Old 08-18-2014, 11:50 PM   #9
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heavier springs in the clutch flyweights
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Old 08-19-2014, 04:18 AM   #10
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heavier springs in the clutch flyweights
Will take the clutch engagement point higher, still not into the powerband.

Kinda like starting off in your car/bike/truck in top gear, only now revving the engine to half redline.... still ain't gonna work, clutch burning in protest all the way.
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Old 08-19-2014, 06:23 AM   #11
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Man that's a long time ago....just remembering how I got around the clutch getting red hot. Chain to the jackstaff and then a belt between the pulley on the jackstaff and the pulley on the wheel axle.

So main drive belt and tensioned with an idler pulley. Crank up the chainsaw motor and then pull the lever to tension the main belt and away I went.Similar to most snowblowers. But then that was easy my Dad was an Ariens/GM dealer so hired some of the best old school mechanics around, no lack of knowledge/welding skills there.

There was a powered tricycle for sale here, no interest in that so I didn't look but from the pics it had Honda 4-Stroke power. Easier to do, centrifugal clutches, gears and chains are easily available. Quieter too....
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Old 08-19-2014, 10:23 AM   #12
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I meant add heavier springs along with a proper reduction ratio as well, so the clutch the engages where the engine makes power. it might not have much of a range but it would at least have a chance at working

you know an 044 is about $1k these days right?
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Old 08-20-2014, 12:24 AM   #13
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Classic chainsaw?
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Old 08-20-2014, 02:08 AM   #14
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I've done something like that. I've connected a small 37cc hedgetrimmer engine to an aluminium mini scooter. I've used a set of sprockets and the chain from an old crosstrainer/gymnastics device.
You'll need a big rearwheel sprocket, almost the size of the wheel.


It's fast, very light and extremely scary. No brake and it'll do 40km/h (25 MpH). Imagine that with a front wheel the size of a beercan in diameter.
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