ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool > 2 smokers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-23-2012, 02:45 PM   #16
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
Thank you Willie. I've drawn a lot of inspiration for my bike from reading your build threads here and on the Yamaha enduro site.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2012, 08:22 AM   #17
Shocktower
Beastly Adventurer
 
Shocktower's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Oregon City Orygun
Oddometer: 9,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Daddy View Post
Thank you Willie. I've drawn a lot of inspiration for my bike from reading your build threads here and on the Yamaha enduro site.

I wish we where closer, I would totally tear my bike down and redo all the paint, BTW I have folowed several of your fine work, and you sir do some fine work
__________________
Alexa Drew Nov 9 1995- Oct 28th 2004 Miss you baby


'08 KTM 530 EXC
79 RD 400 Daytona
Shocktower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2012, 05:53 PM   #18
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
First, let me say, I really appreciate the praise.

This might be the stage where the build starts to bore the readers. I'm pretty anal about details so at times there doesn't appear to be much progress being made, but the little stuff can be tedious.

Since I've done away with the switch gear on the handlebars, I needed a kill switch. I ordered a Moose brand one that's for a CR Honda dirtbike.



Remember I warned you about the details. I spent a lot of time and effort on the brakes on this bike. The stock enduro front brake plate had the typical speedometer cable drive and the brake cable was oriented to route straight off the back of the plate. That caused a long cable and unsightly routing. I wound up scoring some MX bike brake plates off eBay pretty cheap. They don't have the speedometer provisions, and the cable routing is completely different, routing straight up the fork leg. As an added bonus, they are Magnesium and quite a bit lighter in the hand than the original aluminum ones.




Being Magnesium, polishing wasn't really an option so I coated them in the same silver with clear that I used on the engine cases.



Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2012, 06:48 PM   #19
MacNoob
Beastly Adventurer
 
MacNoob's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: The mosquito-y Center of Canada
Oddometer: 1,579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Daddy View Post
This might be the stage where the build starts to bore the readers.
We dare you to try!
MacNoob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2012, 03:45 PM   #20
MarylandStrom
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: Beltsville, Maryland
Oddometer: 339
What are the colored bottles in the background of the fender pick all about?
MarylandStrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2012, 03:48 PM   #21
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarylandStrom View Post
What are the colored bottles in the background of the fender pick all about?
I collect empty beer bottles from beer drinking buddies and powdercoat them to use as color sample display pieces. They're free and show off colors well with their shape.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2012, 05:47 PM   #22
CoyoteCowboy
Easily Distracted
 
CoyoteCowboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Medicine Lodge, Ks (Gyp Hills)
Oddometer: 308
Good Lord man!! Stop it! I'm getting waaaay too inspired!
__________________
"East were the Dead kings and the remembered sepulchres; West was the grass." Archibald MacLeish
CoyoteCowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2012, 08:43 AM   #23
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
After a bit of slow time covering the little details, this thread should get better. The big picture is turning out pretty neat.

Okay, today's installment. The enduro had chrome steel rims, 18 inch front and rear. My vision of the completed bike had deep shouldered aluminum rims in 18 and 21 inch sizes. Initially, I was ready to fess up to Buchanans for new rims and spokes. Good lord, that's 600 dollars for the parts alone. Better back off a few minutes and re-think that.

I wound up buying a set of pretty beat up wheels off eBay. I paid probably more than they were worth (about 160 dollars for the pair delivered through two different auctions). But, that got me the shouldered Takasago rims and the spokes I needed.





I cut the crusty tires off the wheels and then took everything apart. The rims were so bad I had to start with a file to dress out the gouges, then glass bead them to remove the oxidation. After that, it got hard. On the front rim alone, I spent 6 hours sitting in the floor of the living room with a big tub of water and sandpaper. Thankfully my wife is a sport about such matters, although I did take great pains to not splash a single drop of water anywhere.







I put the spokes and nipples into the box to be re-plated. I'm sure some of you guys think I'm a Rockafeller or something for doing this, but the entire plating bill for this whole bike was 50 bucks. I couldn't buy a single set of spokes for that. In the end, every nut, bolt, bracket, clip and widget came back looking as good as new or better for cheap. I do not believe in re-using anything without new plating or protection of some kind. Yes, you can use a wire wheel and make stuff look new, but the plating will be worn off and the exposed metal will corrode shortly. Then you're left with a nice bike with little rusty bits all over it.

Soda blasted and powdercoated the hubs.






Brake plate stuck in there to get and idea of the finished look.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2012, 12:19 AM   #24
awshouse
Downwardly mobile
 
awshouse's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Seattle
Oddometer: 435
subscribed and inspired. Amazing work. thanks for sharing. Andy
__________________
2008 Husky TE 610, 2008 KTM 250 XCF-W, 2004 KTM 950 ADV
awshouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2012, 11:51 AM   #25
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
My original brake actuator levers were chrome plated steel and very heavy, so I got a pair of aluminum ones to replace them with. To the old hand scale, they weight about a third what the steel ones do and didn't need expensive re-chroming.



Bead blasted them polished on the sides and edges to give them a little contrast.


Hubs reassembled. The bearings were in tip top shape so I just cleaned and re-greased them. New seals too. Just a note, I have replaced every single rubber item on this bike. The original stuff is always too crusty after this many years and new stuff isn't a real budget buster. All rubber bits are OEM Yamaha parts.



Junky fork brace that I got off ebay. I spent a lot of time bead blasting it then sanding to remove all the damaged areas. Here it is in sanded form, pictures of full polish in a later installment.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 04:08 PM   #26
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
Here is where I piss off every Yamaha purist.

The enduros had low mount front fenders with little chrome braces. The MX bikes that's I'm copying had high mount front fenders. The original AT1MX fender and mount are impossible to find nowadays so I made do with what I had to work with.

Original front fender.



Grind off spot welds and remove all fender mounting tabs.


A piece of .125 aluminum about 14 inches long and some quality time with the sheetmetal tools.


Test fit onto fenders. New Yamaha fender grommets for a rear fender application.


Drill holes, Powdercoat front fender to match the rear. Mount with grommets, spacers and replated bolts.



Clean and rebuild forks. I used the same silver powder with clear that I used on the engine cases and hubs. New seals, wipers, o ring, etc.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 05:43 PM   #27
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
I wanted to fit up the hubs to the bike before lacing the wheels. Since I'm using hubs and brakes from a later model MX175 bike I wasn't totally sure if they would work properly and space out correctly. The Yamaha parts fiche showed the same axle bolts and bearings so I thought I was on the right track. Better to find out any fitment issues now than later when the wheel is laced and heavy and bulky.




Fortunately everything fit fine and spaced out correctly.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 04:37 PM   #28
Valleyrider
I Survived The '60s
 
Valleyrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Idaho Panhandler
Oddometer: 1,851
AWESOME work!!
One thing I saw might be a concern... Will the forkbrace hit the fender at full travel??

My work isn't even in the same league as yours! You have taken this to a much higher level.
__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/14934865@N07/
'07 1250 Bandit, '06 650 VStrom, '78 SR500E
'68 Yamaha DT1, '78 TT500 and no money
http://www.flickr.com/photos/48000856@N06/
Valleyrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 07:51 AM   #29
pvangel
Team AARP
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: South Salem, NY
Oddometer: 2,437
CAT DADDY!!! Nice work, I'm embbaresed of my restoration project after seeing this. The powder coating is just great, I have priced it out around here and it is way to much to justify doing but it really looks great on your bike.
I'll try harder next time
pvangel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 09:18 AM   #30
Cat Daddy OP
Cob Artist
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Working in my shop in Springtown Texas
Oddometer: 837
Willie, with the fork springs out and the forks completely compressed, there is enough room to slip your hand between the fork brace and the fender.

I didn't get any pictures of the refurbish process, but I slicked up the shock absorbers. I really wanted some trick shocks but on a whim I decided to see what I could do with the originals.

Once disassembled, the shocks were leak free, shafts rust free, and what feels to my hands at least, to have reasonable dampening. Cool deal is, the shock bodies are stainless steel. I polished them as best I could and they really look great now. The springs are coated in yellow. That was just a whim on my part. I had the yellow in the gun from another job and thought it would give the shocks a bit of a trick look.

I am really sorry that I didn't get before pictures. They looked awful. These pics are before I reassembled them. I had to wait for my wife to get home so I could compress the springs while she dropped the upper retainers back in place.




Another little detail that I fussed over was the foot pegs. The enduro had big rubber ones and I wanted MX type steel ones. I asked around and the hot trick was to use early YZ dirt bike pegs. Searching the eBay, I found anyone who was parting an old YZ out wanted stupid big money for the parts. Using the parts fiche at Powersport Plus, I found out that 81 model IT125 bikes used the exact same part number foot pegs as the early 70s YZ bikes did. I found a pair on eBay for 5 bucks total, shipping included.

Originals.


5 dollar eBay find.



Restored.
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014