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Old 04-09-2012, 07:19 PM   #106
amazed
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Heat Sheild

Is it necessary or recommended to have a heat shied to accommodate the CPR Rotweiler? I just received my CPR and this is news to me.
thanks
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:47 PM   #107
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^Nothing I have read from CPR or CJRacer (main person selling them) has stated the need for a heat shield/splash guard. Like many with these bikes, EdGear, just took a DIY approach to try and improve on an already great product CPR has given us. I can tell you I will not be building any sheild for my CPR (Thanks CPR and CJ ). But then again, my 990 see more pavement than trail.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:58 PM   #108
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I'm pretty impressed with the Rottweiler and what a foam air filter has to offer as an improvement over the stock air box. The stock air box looks like a small submarine and is very well protected.

Its my knee jerk reaction to want to protect the Rottweiler. I can't really say a shield is needed, heat and splash may not be a problem.

My reason for the shield is partly from reading this thread and what Tahoeacr discovered insulating the stock air box then putting similar shielding in place with all the air filters he tried. Threads from Cyborg, BillyD and others show the value of insulating the undersides of the 9xx fuels tanks. When you work a 9xx is gets hot under those tanks, hot enough to boil fuel. You don't want hot air going in the intakes.

For the street, removing the stock air box and putting on the Rottweiler allows for a lot more cooling, especially at speed. No problem.

For off road, look at any dirt bike, they have foam filters and air boxes to make it difficult for dust and water to get into the intakes. The tanks and fairing of the 9xx create an air box like enclosure that may work for most. The foam filter on the Rottweiler will keep the dust out and breath better longer. Filter skins will help those who truly spend all their time riding in the dust.

The shield seems like a simple thing to do, try to extend the Rottweiler base plate to the frame. The first one I made out of flashing took about 20 minutes. With that as a template the nicer looking one I posted took about 30 minutes.

If I really had my act together I would have already bought my Tune ECU cable and loaded a proper map so that I would have already tested the shield.

The shield seems like a reasonable thing to do, reassured me that there is heat and splash protection. I'll let you know how it goes. (after I load the proper map)
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:31 AM   #109
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Nothing But a Bunch of Hot Air...

For naturally aspirated engines, few operational variables can have more impact on engine performance (i.e., power and torque) than altitude and intake air temperature.

Thanks to Boyle’s Law, increasing altitude or air temperature results in less air density. Less air density means less fuel going into the motor. Less fuel means less power.

As a general rule of thumb, an intake air temperature increase of 10 F has the same effect as going up 1,000 Feet in altitude.

As such, sucking hot air from between the tanks and above the engine means less power. Hot Rodders have known for decades that lowering intake air temperature results in “free” horsepower and, as Tahoeacr reported with his insulated airbox, an increase in torque as well.

I can see why the SD guys might not bother with any heat shielding on the Rotweiller set-up because their road speeds and resulting airflows are generally higher than one might expect to maintain off-pavement with an Adventure bike that is also more shrouded in its layout. In slower conditions, I would expect the space above the motor and between the tanks to become very hot on an Adventure bike.

If I were to install a Rotweiller on an Adventure, I would take great care to isolate the intake air as much as possible from engine heat and the relatively stagnant hot air between the tanks.

Doing so is simply good air flow and heat management.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:33 PM   #110
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New air box

Billy D

Your comment has much meaning. I'm living in Denver, 5280 feet above sea and going up from there. I will be now be trying to reduce heat into the rotweiler....great information
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:47 PM   #111
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Was able to convert my SE to the new CPR filter set up and the results were pretty amazing. I can change the filter in 3 minutes, which makes life easier After jetting the SE for the filter, I took it for a day long trail ride and put it through it's paces. The throttle response was amazing and it seemed to pull harder also. I was concerned that the filter hanging out in the open would be a problem in dusty conditions but the filter held up well all day. looking forward to more testing in Mexico in a few weeks.

Big Thanks to Ken from ADVmachines for the jetting help and of course big thanks to CJ for hooking a brother up!
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:50 PM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crankshaft View Post
Was able to convert my SE to the new CPR filter set up and the results were pretty amazing. I can change the filter in 3 minutes, which makes life easier After jetting the SE for the filter, I took it for a day long trail ride and put it through it's paces. The throttle response was amazing and it seemed to pull harder also. I was concerned that the filter hanging out in the open would be a problem in dusty conditions but the filter held up well all day. looking forward to more testing in Mexico in a few weeks.

Big Thanks to Ken from ADVmachines for the jetting help and of course big thanks to CJ for hooking a brother up!
What kind of jetting changes did you make??
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:06 PM   #113
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So you can get the filter out of your super enduro without taking the fuel tank off ??
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:08 PM   #114
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+1

Quote:
Originally Posted by billyd View Post
for naturally aspirated engines, few operational variables can have more impact on engine performance (i.e., power and torque) than altitude and intake air temperature.

Thanks to boyle’s law, increasing altitude or air temperature results in less air density. Less air density means less fuel going into the motor. Less fuel means less power.

As a general rule of thumb, an intake air temperature increase of 10 f has the same effect as going up 1,000 feet in altitude.

As such, sucking hot air from between the tanks and above the engine means less power. Hot rodders have known for decades that lowering intake air temperature results in “free” horsepower and, as tahoeacr reported with his insulated airbox, an increase in torque as well.

I can see why the sd guys might not bother with any heat shielding on the rotweiller set-up because their road speeds and resulting airflows are generally higher than one might expect to maintain off-pavement with an adventure bike that is also more shrouded in its layout. In slower conditions, i would expect the space above the motor and between the tanks to become very hot on an adventure bike.

If i were to install a rotweiller on an adventure, i would take great care to isolate the intake air as much as possible from engine heat and the relatively stagnant hot air between the tanks.

Doing so is simply good air flow and heat management.
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:43 AM   #115
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Originally Posted by emuooz View Post
So you can get the filter out of your super enduro without taking the fuel tank off ??
All I need to do is remove the tank bolts and lift the tank enough to get my hand on the Dzues in the front and the filter pops right out. Nothing needs to be disconnected, it's easy. Still working with Ken to do more jetting tweaks but so far the results have been good.
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Old 04-11-2012, 05:55 AM   #116
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Hi Ken,
How soon do you think it'll be before you've determined the final jetting for this air filter and can supply a jetting kit?

Thanks!

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Old 04-12-2012, 09:20 AM   #117
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Riding impressions on a (properly jetted) MotoHooligan airbox on the carbed bikes were that it had about +5hp over the H2W but much reduced throttle response. I can't see why this airbox would be any different...
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:39 PM   #118
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Originally Posted by K2m View Post
I would not advise this if you are running the standard CV carbies. Restriction in the airbox plays a major roll in the working of the vacuum slide, it also determines how much fuel your jets produce. The results would be a slow throttle response, and lean jetting. Even with a wideband I would not recommend this. An FCR set up changes everything.
Then, how come the vacuum slides opens very fast even without any air filter? I just watched them with the air filter removed.
Why can't I tell any difference whatsoever in the throttle response now (with a K&N oval) compared with the OEM?
Yes, I have totally rejetted the 43 mm dia OEM carbs to fit my new setup with the 990SDR motor and the K&N.

Anyway, thinking about FCR's but I dont like the 41 mm diameter when I already had to make 43/53 mm nozzles between the carbs and the huge intakes on the SDR. I just dont like the alternative choice,,,FI neither. Any suggestions apprieciated
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Old 04-12-2012, 02:19 PM   #119
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Then, how come the vacuum slides opens very fast even without any air filter? I just watched them with the air filter removed.
maybe its because what you noticed is response with no load?
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Old 04-12-2012, 02:25 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mousitsas View Post
Riding impressions on a (properly jetted) MotoHooligan airbox on the carbed bikes were that it had about +5hp over the H2W but much reduced throttle response. I can't see why this airbox would be any different...
My experience was better throttle response... I have zero experience with the motohooligan set up, never even seen one, so not sure how to respond. I will say that my CPR filter is properly oiled, which might create some restriction for better response. I'll be on the Dyno next Tuesday, so I'll see what the numbers look like.
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