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Old 03-10-2012, 02:03 PM   #1
MPH OP
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Chain Tension for '78 Suzuki TS185

About the only thing missing on my original-bought-new 1978 Suzuki TS185 is the Owner's Manual. Might someone here have access to one or offer recommendations for drive chain tension on this bike?

A coupla searches came up empty, there's a nice PDF of a '74 manual on the TC/TS forum, but unfortunately it only goes up to p.24, and the chain info is on p.43.

Thanks in advance.
Mark
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Old 03-10-2012, 04:42 PM   #2
PistonPants
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Make it just loose enough that it never gets stretched tight as suspension compresses fully. Have a friend smoosh the shocks as you check chain play. This method works for all chain drives.

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Old 03-11-2012, 07:41 AM   #3
anotherguy
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Set the bike up so the shocks can be disconnected. Lower the bike until the front sprocket,swingarm pivot bolt and rear axle are all in line. This is as tight as the chain gets. Then adjust the chain for 1/2" of play. The reconnect the shocks,get the bike vertical and measure the chain slack. Use that measurement for future adjustment.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:07 AM   #4
MPH OP
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Thanks for the help, guys. Perhaps even moreso, thanks for the general setup rule (1/2" at tightest point), which makes perfect sense. How universal is this? Would this also apply to modern dirtbikes of considerable more travel?

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Old 03-11-2012, 10:51 AM   #5
Tosh Togo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPH View Post
Thanks for the help, guys. Perhaps even moreso, thanks for the general setup rule (1/2" at tightest point), which makes perfect sense. How universal is this? Would this also apply to modern dirtbikes of considerable more travel?

Mark
It's pretty universal as a general rule. Done right, it'll ensure that you never end up with negative chain-slack from normal swingarm travel. There may be exceptions that require more chain slack (RTFM), but this method will ensure that the usual chain-adjusting boo-oo is avoided.

If the chain's too tight, passing through the aforementioned travel point that lines up everything and minimizes slack means that both the countershaft and the rear axle get a serious momentary overload. It may take a little while, but something will break...

One unmentioned caveat is that the measurement is best done with a new/unstretched chain. You can use an old chain with some miles on it, as long as you make sure that you check adjustment with Mr. Chain at the point where there's the least slack...
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Old 03-11-2012, 04:25 PM   #6
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Yes always verify slack at the tightest point on the chain. Find that by spinning the wheel and checking at various points.
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