ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool > Airheads
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-29-2012, 11:23 AM   #1
sigpe57 OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Oddometer: 335
'71 R60/5 Fork Tube Boot Replacement

What's the good procedure to do it? some pictures will really help.

Thanks,

SIG
sigpe57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2012, 12:12 PM   #2
caponerd
Kickstart Enthusiast
 
caponerd's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Halfway between Munich and Redditch.
Oddometer: 1,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by sigpe57 View Post
What's the good procedure to do it? some pictures will really help.

Thanks,

SIG
If they won't stretch enough to pull over the fork sliders after removing the wheel, fender, brake parts, and any other removable items, then you need to drop the fork legs out of the triple clamp and slide the gaiters over the fork legs before you put them back into the triple clamp.

Loosen the pinch bolts on the triple clamp, unscrew the large nuts in the top of the fork tubes, and pull the fork legs out.
(after removing the wheel, brake lines and fender)

Pretty universal technique.
caponerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2012, 12:44 PM   #3
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,456
You'll find pictures in a manual.

Have you ever had the front wheel off? Start there. Then remove everything that is in the way of taking off the two fork lowers. That's all it is. Take off the fork lowers and install rubber boots.

So you have the bike elevated and the front wheel off and the fender off and there doesn't seem to be anything holding the fork lowers on but they just sit there attached to the fork tubes? Look on the bottom of the fork sliders, there is a rubber plug, remove it. Inside is a 13mm nut attached to a threaded bolt with a hex slot in it. Try to turn the 13mm nut with an off set wrench, best, or a socket. If it comes off the lowers will now be removable. If turning the nut also turns the hex bolt then it won't come off. You will need either the deep off set wrench or the special tool made for this that turns the nut and allows the hex bolt to be held with a hex key. It is sometimes possible to put a deep socket on the nut and hold it with a pair of pliers or vise grips and put the hex key up through the middle of the socket.

Most of them come apart with little trouble.

You will need new fork oil because the old oil gets spilled in this operation. If the fork seals leak they should be fixed now and the large rubber plug inside the bottom of the fork slider usually gets replaced.
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2012, 01:49 PM   #4
sigpe57 OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Oddometer: 335
What about alignment?
sigpe57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2012, 03:03 PM   #5
caponerd
Kickstart Enthusiast
 
caponerd's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Halfway between Munich and Redditch.
Oddometer: 1,977
Seems like removing the lowers is more work than taking off the entire fork on each side. You have to drain/refill the oil by removing the lowers.

Alignment can be achieved by putting the wheel and axle back on with the triple clamp pinch bolts and fork brace/fender bolts loose.
Only tighten those after the axle nut has been screwed in and the axle pinch bolt and fork top nuts have been tightened.
caponerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2012, 03:12 PM   #6
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,456
Here is a link to the Duane Ausherman pages which are heavy in information about BMW telescopic forks. There is an article by Randy Glass on his pages but not all the links with in his pages work so it can be hard to find. You will get more than enough info about forks to keep you busy for a couple of years, I not joking.

http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/forks.htm
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 10:53 AM   #7
sigpe57 OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Oddometer: 335
Quote:
Originally Posted by caponerd View Post

Loosen the pinch bolts on the triple clamp, unscrew the large nuts in the top of the fork tubes, and pull the fork legs out.
(after removing the wheel, brake lines and fender)
When you put back the fork legs, do you usually do the fork alignment check? I don't think any of the dealer or mechanics do that.

In Duane's site,

"We found that .004"-.006" could cause a severe wobble . Our spec became .001" or about perfect. "

http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/forktool/index.htm

0.001" between two forks is a pretty tight spec.
sigpe57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2013, 02:51 PM   #8
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by sigpe57 View Post
What's the good procedure to do it? some pictures will really help.

Thanks,

SIG
Clean the triple so crap don't get in the tubes.

Remove tank to avoid damage your first time with this. Elbow room too. Golf t's in the fuel lines.

loosen bolts headlight ---> ears a bit.

Remove wheel, hang the brake plate or set on box (IIRC), fender and fender/fork braces come off legs as a unit. Legs are now only held by triple tree. You can do it with the lowers linked, but it's more difficult.

Do one side at a time. This leaves one side holding the headlight by one ear with the other ear in position for your tube.



Remove the fork top nuts. Beware the springs. loosen the lower triple tree clamp. Slide the entire fork down out of the triple and headlight ears. If you mark the tubes first you can put them back in exactly the same place (rotationally) as they were. if the handling was good, it should remain that way.

if the lower triple won't open enough to slide the tube out, Put large screwdriver in the notch in the slot and twist with wrench. look around for the notch.

Swap out the boot and put it all right back without letting go of the leg. Snug bolts lightly. off with this, on with that and back it goes. Be sure to line up the boot vent hole on the lower triple tree vent tube (a roll pin). Boot clamps in place and loose. You can just dump it all on and really get the boot in final position later. But get them right side up.

Do other side same way.

Tighten from the top down. except put the caps on after tightening the top nut so you can get to the nut.



Fender and brace goes back. nuts not tight.

Wheel and brake in, nuts not tight.

Handlebars back if loosened for clearance. Tight. You will need them soon.


Check the steering head bearing. Adjust if needed. This is a good time for it.

Tighten things that link the lowers from the top down, doing the bouncy bouncy as you go down. Standard for R&R wheel or anything affecting a connection between fork lower. See manual for picture.

Put tank back.

Turn forks lock to lock and check wiring.

Put SS100 or something on new boots with a bit of foam. Do this often to prevent cracking.

Go for a ride.





This is an excellent time to do the front turn signal ground mod. It's easy if the ears are off'available and it will make your turn signals work better. Also poke rubbers on both ends of the ears. Replace if hard.


If the bike has a history of corroded and frozen fasteners, crack everything loose first. Deal with problem children, then proceed. Just remove each bolt, clean it up on a brass wire wheel, touch of anti sieze and put it back. This is just working on old bikes, You do it a lot and bring things up every time you touch them.

Plaka screwed with this post 09-21-2013 at 03:00 PM
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2013, 05:00 PM   #9
JonnyCash
turd polisher
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Midcoast, Maine
Oddometer: 1,436
If you pull off the lowers, without disturbing the triples, then you don't affect the alignment. If you drop the whole fork leg out of the triple, then yes, you do have to look after the alignment. If you drop both lowers at the same time, and leave the fender, fender strut, and the fork brace undisturbed, then that is one more assurance that you won't wind up in a bind. This all assumes that is was indeed well aligned in the first place.
__________________
I wouldn't bring her home to Mama, but Mama ain't home tonight.
JonnyCash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-2013, 05:21 PM   #10
boxerboy81
Stay Horizontal
 
boxerboy81's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Oddometer: 2,213
Dropping and replacing both lowers doesn't take more than 1 hour does it?
Certainly less complicated than removing the lot.
Plan to replace fork seals if needed to.
boxerboy81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 08:48 AM   #11
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxerboy81 View Post
Dropping and replacing both lowers doesn't take more than 1 hour does it?
Certainly less complicated than removing the lot.
Plan to replace fork seals if needed to.
Have you done this recently?

Quite a few issues with the method, and you don't save any work. try it

I changed boots recently and did it the really fast way. The only thing that came off was the front wheel (disc calipers were off already or I would have hung them). Drop the entire front end in one piece, put on boots, replace. There are some tricks to it, mostly having to do with keeping the clamps expanded so you you can slide both tubes as a pair. Because the tubes slide in the lowers you can actually get one in leading the other, which helps. But i've done it more than once. For first time out when the front end hasn't been apart in a long time if ever, I don't recommend it.

There are two different alignments, tubes in triples and lowers to eachother. if you drop the entire front end as a unit and mark the tubes so they aren't rotated, all goes back as it was. if you drop the tunes individually and you mark them, they go back as they were. If you seperate the lowers, they get the 'simple' alignment. Any time you remove the front wheel it gets the 'simple' alignment.

OH-MY-GAWD about very high speed instability always cracks me up. it's one of those things that you don't know about unless you're going really fast and then it's too late. Just the perfect OH-MY-GAWD item. Kinda like the wrong oil that will trash your engine, but it takes 150,000miles to find out. If the front alignment is poor you know all about it at pretty low speed. Bumpy corners and the steering isn't right, etc. The front suspension does everything it can ever do at fairly low speed if you challenge it with things like washboard, tight turns, slow sweepers, etc. What does change when you're really hauling the mail, on some bikes*, is the aerodynamics. You can get the front end light. If you want to experience this, put a LOT of weight as far behind the rear axle as possible. BTDT. The front end gets light and it goes into weaves and slappers at not much speed at all (60 mph). When I have had this happen I have been able to brace and control it, and then dial in a bunch of fork dampening untill I could change the loading.

I would say if you are planning on a lot of high speed work, the fork alignment need to be good enough so it's dead smooth (spring out). The front wheel needs to stay pointed in the same direction as the forks compress. If there is twist in the geometry then the wheel actually shakes side to side as the sliders compress. You can check for this on the centerstand. Then put a functional steering dampener on it and use it.



* MY K100RS would only really settle down at 80MPH. You could feel the whole bike sit down and from there on it was a totally solid rocket. My R100RS is not so sensitive. I can't actually feel it when the front aeros really kick in. It's dead stable at any speed and you can roll it well over 100 without noticing a handling change. My 90/5, no fairing, would get light in front as you went faster. It got pretty load sensitive over 90 or so. loaded well, it was comfortable cruising at 90 at altitude, 80 at sea level and would run over a hundred and only feel mildly scary.

Plaka screwed with this post 09-22-2013 at 09:37 AM
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 08:55 AM   #12
JonnyCash
turd polisher
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Midcoast, Maine
Oddometer: 1,436
I can absolutely do this in an hour, provided that I don't find something else that needs attention. I'm not saying that I'm a wizard, just that its pretty easy and simple.
__________________
I wouldn't bring her home to Mama, but Mama ain't home tonight.
JonnyCash is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014