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Old 04-04-2012, 05:24 AM   #31
novaboy OP
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Motorhead, thanks for the info, appreciate the first hand advice. I'm gonna start looking around for used or leftover KTM 200-300. There is a 2011 300XCW with only 25hrs in Nova Scotia, but the dealer wants $6999. So there might be a drive to the US later this spring.
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Old 04-04-2012, 05:29 AM   #32
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...you can't go wrong with one of these beauties!
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:56 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Tbone View Post
Go a local race and see what people are racing and pay attention to what guys in your class are doing well on. Talk to some of them..ask questions. I know I love talking motorcycles, even more so to someone looking to get someone involved in a sport I love.
this is the correct answer.

It's also far more important to spend your money on set up (ergonomics, suspension) to make the bike work for you than it is on anything power related.

The woods KTM or Husvarna 4 stroke 250s are fine as is a well set up Yamaha. Keep in mind the KTM and Husvarna start as woods bikes, not MX bikes like all the Japanese bikes do. I know too many people with problems with Honda 250s to even consider one.

Not being worried about twisting the throttle too much is a great thing - don't buy a 450.
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:59 AM   #34
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4 strokes can be a little easier for newbies to get thier heads around in terms of power characteristics.
TRUTH! My previous dirt experience was an XR80 that I had when I was 13. I picked up a KTM200EXC(which I'm glad to see is the most recommended bike so far) and I must say the learning curve of going from pretty much riding just sport bikes to full dirt/single track on a 2 stroke has been a pretty interesting learning curve vs. what I expect a 4 stroke would have been. Whiskey throttling a 2 stroke or at least the one I have turns into complete insanity super fast if you're a newer rider. At least in my experience. But, other than that two strokes are FUN FUN FUN.



Examples of whiskey throttle oops...

Whiskey throttle going up a steep hill, first day out on the bike, hadn't adjusted the bark busters and punched a tree. No, I don't wear the ring while riding anymore.



Whiskey throttle after getting squirrelly through a mud puddle ends up in a swan dive into a deeper mud puddle. Buddy wasn't following close enough to get the actual splash down but you get the aftermath.



But again, I love the 200. I actually was just getting it for trail riding but really glad to see this thread as I want to do some ATV Motion series races next fall. Thought about doing one this spring but no way do I think I'll be ready for it yet so going to take spring and summer and ride a bunch then see about doing some enduro/races in the fall.

So far I've ridden dirt, rock, sand(sand is horrible), and did my first MX track last weekend. MX tracks are RAD for being able to work on various things as it's repetitive. Also jumping a bike for the first time was a good rush too. I was wanting to work on turning and trying to get faster with that so it was great to be able to know exactly what was coming with the next turn.

Anyhow, fun fun stuff will be looking for any and all suggestions and recommendations for getting better at single track/enduro style riding. Mostly right now I"m out of shape, so going to start trying to do stuff to get into better shape, I think that will help a lot.

Cheers! Nice to see other mid life crisis guys hanging it out there. I'm 39.
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Old 04-04-2012, 08:17 AM   #35
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maybe, our mid-life crisis is just our "suppressed childhood" coming out and the bikes are a "therapy tool".... lol

if the Baja 1000 is a ultra-marathon, then hare scrambles are mini-marathons.

my buddy (also having a 2nd/3rd mid-life crisis) is considering a crf250x to scramble and enduro. the choice is mostly economically driven (neither of us can afford a newer KTM 200/300), he also has to buy trailer to haul bikes.

anyway, keep us posted on your bike choice and racing experience. it would be nice to have an "old farts with mid-life crisis racing scrambles/enduro" thread here.
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Old 04-04-2012, 08:24 AM   #36
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Great input Silver ! Keep riding with faster people and you'll get quicker. Sounds so simple but it works.

p.s. you probably know about adjusting your power valve but if not it's worth leaning about.
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Old 04-04-2012, 08:46 AM   #37
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Hrm, negative not aware of power valve adjustments, that something I should look up on ktmtalk? Right now it seems to be jetted right. Suspension is a heavier suspension and setup for 200 pound rider which is pretty much perfect for me. It's got the stock hockey stick pipe on it but also came with an aftermarket FMF pipe. I've gotten mixed opinions on whether I should try that out or not.

It had a tall Enduro Engineering seat that was just way too tall to learn with so I swapped back out to the stock seat. I'm probably going to swap back up as I get better as most riders say the tall seat is easier to grip with your knees.

Hah, can we change this to "Newbies interested in enduros and hare scrambles"
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Old 04-04-2012, 09:33 AM   #38
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Silver,
Your able to adjust when the power valve opens on your 200. Basically you can decide at what rpm it "hits". KTM talk or owners manual(Youtube even has videos of it) would be the best place to look as the 200 is different than the 250/300. I've got mine set-up to open as fast as possible as with my 240lbs I need it bogeying like "now".

A taller seat makes it easier to stand up when you need to. I'm only 5'9" so making mine any higher is a detriment.

I wouldn't worry about the pipe for now.But if you do decide to bolt it on you shouldn't have to re-jet.

Tbone screwed with this post 04-04-2012 at 09:40 AM
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:17 AM   #39
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At 49 with very little offroading experience C rider, I entered my first ever enduro race a few weeks ago...finished the 75 miles in 5 h 52 min...with a 2004 CRF250R because that's the only dirt bike I have. Now that I experienced what's involved in an enduro, I am thinking about a Husky WR144 with an auto-clutch.

My crf does not have an auto-clutch, and I think out of the 450 riders I was the only one without it. Every bike I looked at had a Rekluse stamped on the clutch cover.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:25 AM   #40
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Congrats on finishing!!! I'll tell you I had a two 9th place finishes then a 5th in the beginning of the season this year. I put in a Rekluse and won the next two..so I'm a big believer!.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:42 AM   #41
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Congrats, these are great results Tbone. Yeah, anyone I speak to pretty much say they'll never go back to a non-auto clutch.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:45 AM   #42
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Congrats Toro, well done.

The search for a bike continues and the fight, I mean debate with the Opposition Leader (my lovely wife) continues over why I need a dirt bike in an already full garage of toys, some which is up for sale. LOL.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:50 AM   #43
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For your size I would definitely recommend a KTM 200...

Start with small goals, just finish some races. You have MTB experience, depending on what terrain you ride, you will have an eye for good line selection.

I ride a YZ250 set up for woods. I absolutely love it, but its not cheap to set up a MX bike, so i would defnitely recommend a Husky200, Gasgas 200, ktm 200, etc....

I also run a Rekluse, besides revalving the suspension the Rekluse has been the best mod to my bike. That being said, I would never recommend one to a brand new offroad rider. Get a bike, get very comfortable with it, learn the proper braking and clutch techniques for a year or two, then step up to a rekluse.

You sound like you are in good shape but keep in mind being fit and being BIKE fit do not always mean the same thing. Work on your core, and more core and more core.

Remember have fun and keep learning, i learn new stuff every time I ride. Thats what keeps me wanting to ride all the time
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:52 AM   #44
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Tbone: Thank you for the info! Will have to look into that. I'm pretty much getting used to where the power band is now, chugging through single track I'll have it in second normally and can be on the pipe with just a tiny turn and BAM on the pipe.

My KTM has a rekluse, only bummer is it's the z-start and not the z-start pro so no full clutch overide. Clutch works, but it will walk with the clutch pulled in and you in gear if you rev it up very much. Also has a GPR steering damper, bash plate, carbon fiber pipe guard, the expanded rear brake oil resevior and a lot of other goodies. I'll probably ride a bit more with the stock seat and then take it with me sometime and trade them out mid day see what the difference feels like.

Congrats on the finish Toro! Good stuff. I'm going to an ATV Motion race next weekend but probably just doing a write up on it, not going to ride in it.
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Old 04-04-2012, 12:33 PM   #45
Tbone
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Originally Posted by Rider_WV View Post
I also run a Rekluse, besides revalving the suspension the Rekluse has been the best mod to my bike. That being said, I would never recommend one to a brand new offroad rider. Get a bike, get very comfortable with it, learn the proper braking and clutch techniques for a year or two, then step up to a rekluse.

Couldn't agree more. My daughter wants a rekluse so bad for her 200 she can taste it, but not happening for a couple more years as she has much to learn in the clutch control dept. And guys, don't be afraid to play with the clickers on your suspensions. Just make sure to write down what your doing, and make big swings so you can feel a definitive difference then go from there.

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