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Old 04-17-2012, 06:39 PM   #1
akabeton OP
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GSPD wheel removal and tire replacement VIRGIN

I am thinking of doing this myself, to save money, but most of all to gain experience for when I may have to do it on the road. I have looked in my manual and it looks relatively straightforward, but I thought I'd check on here for some expert advice.

Are there things to look out for ( like not squeezing the front brake with the wheel off etc ) so I don't kick myself more than necessary afterwards.

I have ordered a pair Heidenau K76, they should be here in a couple of days.

Thanks
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:44 PM   #2
One Less Harley
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give this a look, or do a search to find some other tips. I didn't read the link but it should help.
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:04 PM   #3
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Ned's dirt tire change clinic is golden, but breaking the bead on tubeless meats as your PD has often requires more oomph (and lube). It can and has been done a billion times on the trailside, search here or GSpot for tutorials etc

like this one: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=607135
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:27 PM   #4
Biebs
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Wicked No Problem

Not sure what your mileage is but front wheel bearings should be replaced - Did mine at 50K.

On the tires - learn how to remove the wheel/Tire combo put in your pickup truck drive to local bike shop drop off and go get some food. Come back pickup set go back home and install.
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Old 04-18-2012, 01:18 AM   #5
batoutoflahonda
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If you mount the tire to the rim yourself, let us know how it goes with those K76s. Any more, the beads on the dual sport tires have gotten so thick, I won't buy certain tires because they are almost impossible to mount with irons, which makes them useless if I can't fix a tube on the road. With that in mind, I feel it best to mount unknown tires myself so I know if I can get them on and off. Buy quality irons like Buzzeti and get at least three..(I have a tool box full of busted Motion Pro's.) Those tube snakes are kinda cool too.

I carry a small can of WD40 for lube on roadside repairs (WD40 will dry, but not as fast as soap) and you can get away with carrying just a tube for the largest tire as you can use it in the smaller to limp to a repair area. Patches are good too if the tube isn't ripped up. So are zip ties in an absolute emergency. You can zip tie the tire to the rim to keep it from coming off the bead and SLOWLY ride the flat to a suitable place for help/repairs.

Letting the tires sit in the sun or warming them helps a lot too.
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Old 04-18-2012, 01:49 AM   #6
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I'm a big DIY fan but I've given up on trying to chang my tyres. The worst part of it is I'm running tubes & am totally stuffed if I get a flat in ther wops.
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Old 04-18-2012, 07:47 AM   #7
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Tubeless

Thought I should add, the bike is a 1995 and running tubeless.
Mileage is only 15k, I'm hoping the wheel bearings are fine.
I'm thinking I may struggle breaking the bead, after 17 years ( the original Michelin tires are still on)

Anything I should look out for removing the wheels ( other than not pressing front brake )??

Thanks for the input so far.
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:38 AM   #8
batoutoflahonda
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Tubeless I take to the shop unless you have a machine. Saves on scratching the rim and you can plug them on the road.

This works too and I think is the cat's meow:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=299597
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:58 AM   #9
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Wicked Brakes / tires

Yes do not grab the front brake lever better yet find a scrap 1 x 2 or piece of wood to put in the brake calapier in case someone else grabs the front brake lever. Would not worry about wheel bearings at 15K

Also these are tubless tires the beads are much thicker and in the case of a flat out on the trail the thicker bead should keep the tire on the rim for a "limp home mode" A can of "flat fix" may be a temp repair. The older tube tires were easier to change but a tubless without a tire changing machine is like "beating a dead horse" yes it can be done but not worth it.
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Old 04-18-2012, 10:26 AM   #10
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I skimmed through that link and I do know about all that. Good luck getting your beads to come all the way out without lube for starters.

I have had MP tire irons like that since '88 and have never broke them. I can't imagine using that much force to change a tire. Maybe some of them have air bubbles in them? I love mine.

You can bust tubeless beads at home no problem with a good auto scissor jack, some wood blocks, and a door jam.

Remember the motto "work the well". Changing the tire is the whole reason rims have that deep center or what I call the rim well. With both beads loose push the bead as far into the well as possible. Do that by pressing down on the sidewall with your knees while you work your tire iron under the bead on the other side. Let the tire go into the well where there is no stem to keep it from going up in there another fraction of an inch. EVERY advantage combined is critical for easy tire work! Now the tire has the depth of the well to move aside the rim for room for removal. Same story putting it back on!

You will need a tire balancer. People like the new portable ones on the market now. I try to point out that a real one that is its own stand that has FOUR non-sealed loose bearing pressed into large discs for less friction are not that much more money.

The rims often need cleaned with a SOFT wire wheel or they will leak air around the bead.

Good luck! It takes a nack that a lot of people just don't seem to have.

Rubber tubeless valve stems rot over time. Check it.

supershaft screwed with this post 04-18-2012 at 10:47 AM
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Old 04-18-2012, 10:26 AM   #11
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I prefer to change my own.. well, let me re-phrase, I wish to be able to change my own. In reality I wish somebody else would do it, but I respect that I'll need the skills. You may have noticed it costs good money to have somebody change tires, and its well worth it.

Nevertheless, I still change my own and my current bete noir is popping the tube while putting it back together. I run a tube with tubeless rims strictly because re-seating a bead in the woods has proven difficult in the past. Actually, if you can get it close, than a blast of CO2 from one of those magic puffers was what finally worked, and I carry them now, but I dont want to rely on them to seat a bead, imo the most difficult part of the whole process, only slightly ahead of unseating the same bead. Unless the tire is really warm from use, I dont have a good idea for unseating the bead in the field using stuff only on your bike... it requires a friend's kickstand. CAnt use your own after you get the tire off, DAMHIK. :Lol2

Supershaft is right- you have to use the well. Use the irons to get the tire over the rim and take it in small bites.

I use some windex or windshield wiper fluid (if i have any lube) as a lube, and two irons, a valve core device and a 12 or 13mm for the tube valve. I practice with only the stuff I'll have in the woods at teh worst possible time, so often times I'll wait till its dark and raining and I already have a headache, but really need new knobs. The universe is conspiring to get me the best practice possible.

I can do both front and back in about two hours with a bunch of goofing off and not actually working. If all goes well, and I dont have to repeat anything.
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Old 04-18-2012, 10:41 AM   #12
supershaft
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With my tubeless if I have a flat I can't repair with a VULCANIZING tire plug I call it a day. I have had quite a few flats and so far I have never had to call it a day. One time I came out of a gas station and my tire was flat. Some biker types in a pickup truck kindly offered to load my bike up in their pickup and take me back to the camp site. I said no thanks as I pulled my tool tray out, bent down and pulled the nail out, stuck a plug in, and rolled the bike to the pump to put air in the tire all before they were ready to leave. That flat took five minutes out of my vacation! Without the air compressor handy it would have taken ten.

Actually it was my friend that said no thanks before I had the chance to. He had seen me repair a flat before and knew what was coming.

supershaft screwed with this post 04-18-2012 at 11:58 AM
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:44 AM   #13
akabeton OP
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Wheels Off

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Old 04-18-2012, 11:57 AM   #14
akabeton OP
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No luck breaking the bead :-p

I knew that including the word " VIRGIN " in the original thread title would attract the " creme de la creme " of ADVers.

Thanks, OneLessHarley, Stagehand, Supershaft, Batoutofahonda, Biebs, Mugwest and Padmei.

AirheadWrangler and SoloLobo are probably out riding. ;-)

Beads not for breaking, heading to the tire shop.

Thanks

Will give a report on the Heidenau K76's.
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:58 AM   #15
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Man that looks in good shape!
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