ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-26-2012, 06:00 PM   #16
Joey Stalin
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joey Stalin's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: nOvA
Oddometer: 219
Saw this on Slickdeals today, Northface 40 degree bag for $37

http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/7320...BQAAAAAFO0Ezbg

I have a down bag I got on a deal last year for about $50 that packs up SMALL, which to me is very important on a bike.
__________________
Joseph "Joey" Stalin
vfr800, all of the pieces to make a klr-650...
formerly r1100rt-p
Joey Stalin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 06:12 PM   #17
ssevy
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Southern Adirondacks
Oddometer: 754
Quote:
Originally Posted by perterra View Post
Just call Wiggys and ask a pointed question. He's a jerk.
Fortunately, he doesn't come with the bag. While his manner can be abrasive (to say the least), his gear has far surpassed any other insulated gear that I have owned, and I have owned a bunch. His two bag system will give you the flexibility to cover very wide temperature extremes most comfortably. When you are sitting in a freezing cold tent listening to the rain turn to sleet, you won't give a shit about his manners, as you'll be warm and dry. Forget down, when it gets wet it is useless, and when you are on a trip with a motorcycle, the smart money will always bet on at least a few days of rain.
ssevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 07:39 PM   #18
PhilzLeads
Goin' mobile
 
PhilzLeads's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Peoples Republic of MD
Oddometer: 61
My Two Centavos

To the OP, when you say you want a bag that will cover a certain temp range, keep in mind that that particular temp range does not necessarily mean you will be comfortable. It means you will most likely not suffer hypothermia. Bags are rated a certain way, and most with the use of a ground pad. You should go with a bag that is rated 10-15 degrees lower than the lowest night time temps you expect to encounter. If you are a "warm sleeper", you can always open a bag that is too warm. But if you are a "cold sleeper", you may have a long night in a bag not rated for low temps.

I have a Wiggys, but I would never carry it on the bike, its for car camping/hunting. I've slept in it at about 14F in a tent and was toasty.

My bike sleeping bag is a Marmot Never Winter. It is rated to 30F. I also have a Sea-to-Summit Thermolite REACTOR bag. I have the extreme model. This is essentially a fabric bag that you put in your sleeping that will increase its rating to a lower temp. It packs to a size smaller than a Nalgene bottle. I just used this setup tent camping in N. PA. When I awoke, my water bottle left out all night was just slushing out of the bottle, I was comfy with this setup.

Other factors are, I bring along a sleeping hat. Knit cap type of thing. The Marmot Never Winter is a down mummy bag

Here's a guide to the EN rating and Marmot's: http://marmot.com/product/content/en-tested.
__________________
'05 DRZ-400
'01 BMW F650GS Dakar
'06 Yamaha FJR1300A
Yamaha 360(sold) Kaw H2 750(sold) Kaw KZ1000(sold) Ducati 900SS CR(sold)
....and the struggle for the legal tender....

PhilzLeads screwed with this post 04-26-2012 at 07:55 PM Reason: correction
PhilzLeads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 07:42 PM   #19
perterra
-. --- .--. .
 
perterra's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Tejas
Oddometer: 7,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssevy View Post
Fortunately, he doesn't come with the bag. While his manner can be abrasive (to say the least), his gear has far surpassed any other insulated gear that I have owned, and I have owned a bunch. His two bag system will give you the flexibility to cover very wide temperature extremes most comfortably. When you are sitting in a freezing cold tent listening to the rain turn to sleet, you won't give a shit about his manners, as you'll be warm and dry. Forget down, when it gets wet it is useless, and when you are on a trip with a motorcycle, the smart money will always bet on at least a few days of rain.

I've heard it is good quality, after the phone call I pretty much just bought a kelty and let it go at that. Could be smaller but I hate tight bags.
__________________
My Father was my maker. Poverty was my maker. Distrust was my maker. I have met them all my life.


IBA 22425
perterra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 07:46 PM   #20
mookybird
Gramps
 
mookybird's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Olympic Peninsula, Washington State
Oddometer: 211
Just my opinion based on my own experiences whether you choose down or synthetic be sure to take girth "how big around at the chest and foot" as well as length into account, the best bag in the world blows if it's too snug or short.

The difference between high and low priced bags is how much they weigh and how small they compress, if you have room for a fairly large stuff sack "watermelon size or so" there isn't any reason to go buy a Western Mountaineering bag, I have two of them and use them a bunch but my favorite bags are the heavier bulkier bags that I've used for well over twenty years and cost about 1/3 the cost of my WM bags.

There are no magic sleeping bags, if it weighs 9 ounces and packs the size of a grapefruit it either cost about $400 or your going to freeze in it unless your in a really warm place.

For most of my excursions space always seems very limited and a synthetic bag isn't an option, I like them when I'm car camping or in the wall tent but comparing bags of equal warmth the down bag will be the more compact package.

As to down vs synthetic when wet? I agree a wet down bag is useless but then a wet synthetic bag probably wouldn't be as comfortable as a dry one so just keep your bag dry. I've used down bags for years worth of multiday creekboating trips, we managed to camp in snow and spend days running rapids and waterfalls with the bag jammed in the nose of an 8 foot kayak and kept the bags dry so it has to be manageable in a pannier.

Western Mountaineerings website lists the specs of their bags, measurements and weights and they have an enviable reputation for accuracy in temp ratings. I'm not suggesting you buy one as they are expensive and overkill for hauling around on a motorbike but you can use their specs to compare other bags with keeping in mind most companies bags fall far short of the specified weight and warmth rating listed.

Based on the responses you've probably gathered that opinions on Wiggy's runs a little strong, if your set on synthetic and don't mind spending a pile of money you might google Kifaru and see what they are offering these days as well. Enjoy Denny

mookybird screwed with this post 04-26-2012 at 07:49 PM Reason: spelling correction
mookybird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2012, 08:17 PM   #21
PhilzLeads
Goin' mobile
 
PhilzLeads's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Peoples Republic of MD
Oddometer: 61
Wink

Quote:
As to down vs synthetic when wet? I agree a wet down bag is useless but then a wet synthetic bag probably wouldn't be as comfortable as a dry one so just keep your bag dry. I've used down bags for years worth of multiday creekboating trips, we managed to camp in snow and spend days running rapids and waterfalls with the bag jammed in the nose of an 8 foot kayak and kept the bags dry so it has to be manageable in a pannier.
Or....you can just stuff the down bag in a waterproof stuff sac. I've ridden for hours in the rain with an Ortlieb bag behind me. Everything in it bone dry. Yea, if you can't keep it dry in panniers, then maybe do what our forefathers did. Wool blankets tied with leather cords.....and a shot of whiskey!.....
__________________
'05 DRZ-400
'01 BMW F650GS Dakar
'06 Yamaha FJR1300A
Yamaha 360(sold) Kaw H2 750(sold) Kaw KZ1000(sold) Ducati 900SS CR(sold)
....and the struggle for the legal tender....
PhilzLeads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 09:05 AM   #22
FatChance
Road Captain
 
FatChance's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Durango, Colorado, USA
Oddometer: 10,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilzLeads View Post
Yea, if you can't keep it dry in panniers, then maybe do what our forefathers did. Wool blankets tied with leather cords.....and a shot of whiskey!.....
I always use that last option, just in case...
__________________
Pain in the Butte Ranch
Durango, Colorado

- Calculated risk or forbidden fruit?
FatChance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 11:43 AM   #23
ssevy
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Southern Adirondacks
Oddometer: 754
Keep in mind that if you sweat heavily as I do, over several days of cold rainy weather a down bag can absorb alot of moisture, even if it doesn't see a drop of rain. The waterproof bag will keep the moisture in just as well as out, so if you don't have a chance to air your bag well, the moisture you generated with your sweat and breathing the night before will be waiting for you when you unpack it the next day.
ssevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 12:08 PM   #24
FatChance
Road Captain
 
FatChance's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2003
Location: Durango, Colorado, USA
Oddometer: 10,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssevy View Post
Keep in mind that if you sweat heavily as I do, over several days of cold rainy weather a down bag can absorb alot of moisture, even if it doesn't see a drop of rain.
If I were on a long motorcycle trip and sweated heavily and had several days of cold, rainy weather, I would probably just check into a motel, take a hot shower and have a shot of that whiskey...
__________________
Pain in the Butte Ranch
Durango, Colorado

- Calculated risk or forbidden fruit?
FatChance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 12:13 PM   #25
woolsocks
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Oddometer: 224
Big Agnes with a Big Agnes sleeping pad. Make sure you get one of their insulated pads because in my camping experience, the ground can really suck the heat out of your body through a non-insulated pad even when it's 40 to 50 degrees F outside.
woolsocks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 12:44 PM   #26
Kirkster
Parts Murderer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Peoples Republic of MD
Oddometer: 293
My Gear

Here is my camp gear in its bag that goes on the bike.



Contents of said bag.



Sleeping bag is in the yellow and grey waterproof stuff sack.

The yellow roll right below it is the pad.

Bag is a Big Agnes Lost Ranger, the pad is and Exped SynMat UL 7.

Packs nice and small...

Cheers
__________________
TAT 2013 the "I'm Just Sayin" tour
BMW 2007 R1200R
2012 KTM 690 R
07 WR 450F
Kirkster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2012, 01:35 PM   #27
kellyk7
Who knows
 
kellyk7's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: North West Alabama (The Shoals)
Oddometer: 1,746
Slumberjack - Why not

One Sleeping bag I have not seen posted here is the Slumberjack Ultimate 30

I have this bag as one of my mid weight bags - I love it because it is light weight , compresses down to a roll that is 14 inches long and 5 inch around, and honestly is way warmer then most 30 deg bags I have slept in. Plus it only cost 50.00

http://www.slumberjack.com/p-542-ult...=sleeping-bags

I fancy myself as something of a gear aficionado, when it comes to sleeping bags I have a pile, everything from Kelty, to North Face Quest, Coleman, Slumberjack. Most bags in the budget range, I would honestly say do not live up to their ratings, I have 20 deg bags I freeze in at 35 deg. this little Slumberjack is spot on, I have no problem grabbing it when I am expecting 30 deg temps. it has footbox vents as well to help with the warmer times. It is just a solid nice priced bag.
__________________
There's a fine line between "RED ASS" and "DUMB ASS"

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass... It is about learning how to dance in the rain" - HAWK
kellyk7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 08:34 AM   #28
Emanuele OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Italy and Iowa
Oddometer: 26
Thank you guys!
You are all grea, seriously! I am going to have to save this thread and read it a few times!
For now I am steeling on the Big Agnes bag because of their sleeping system: I turn around countless of times during the night and I feel the integrated sleeping lag will really be a blessing for me.
__________________
2007 BMW R1200 GS
Emanuele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 11:13 AM   #29
forrestlaw
Gnarly Adventurer
 
forrestlaw's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Houston, TX
Oddometer: 304
Once you get to the higher end brands any bag will do as long as it meets your temp requirements. The big decisions at this time are 1) down or synthetic and 2) how the bag is cut.

I have two bags. First is a North Face 20 degree down bag that I have had for about 8 years and second is a 35 degree mountain hardwear bag that I've had for two. Both are great and the temps where I will be dictate which one goes with. Try and find an REI, EMS, or similar store that will let you unpack the bag and climb into it. Most of the quality bag manufacturers offer zippers on either side, so make sure you get the correct zipper that you prefer. If you want to get one that will last and that the manufacterer will stand behind if you have any problems then stick with the higher end camping/backpacking gear companies (eg Marmot, Mountain Hardwear, Big Agnes, Sierra Designs, etc...)

Ultimately, you need to decide which features you want and then find a bag with said features that is cut the way you like.
forrestlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 01:26 PM   #30
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 8,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirkster View Post
Here is my camp gear in its bag that goes on the bike.



Contents of said bag.



Sleeping bag is in the yellow and grey waterproof stuff sack.

The yellow roll right below it is the pad.

Bag is a Big Agnes Lost Ranger, the pad is and Exped SynMat UL 7.

Packs nice and small...

Cheers
What Hilleberg you use ?
I have a Solou and a Jannu. Also have a Bibler.
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014