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Old 05-17-2015, 01:06 PM   #1
Rastapapa OP
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Joined: May 2015
Location: Fillmore
Oddometer: 5
New Adventure Rider

I was wondering where one finds trails to learn on. Or what are the best trails to learn on? I bought my '06 950 Adv. To go exploring with less cost than loading my rig and hauling gear 7 hours to camp and ride. I'm not young, 53 and I figure I'm only good for 2-3 days sleeping in a tent/hammock?
I ride alone as i don't have friends with the same likes. I have joined a motorcycle club in hopes of finding a riding partners, but it seems the few that ride adventure bikes are racers and I'm obviously not.
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Old 05-17-2015, 08:10 PM   #2
oldmanb777
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Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Centennial,Co./ Grand Lake,Co
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Man, you bought a lot of bike for a newbie. be vary carful out there with too much bike. So try to find someone in your area to go with. If they have a small lightweight bike (like you should learn on) they can do so much you can't with the big bike, so don't try. Take some easy county type dirt and gravel roads to start with. You really need to learn on a lightweight small dirt bike. But what you have is what you have. So take it easy. Getting hurt will ruin the adventure. Get in the section for your area. Offer a meetup, or join other meetups. Try to get with a few riders that will respect your abilities, and bring you along.
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Old 05-18-2015, 05:24 PM   #3
DSchmidt7of7
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Location: SoCal - OC and San Berdo Mtns
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Here's some quick thoughts:

1. If you're REALLY new I'd say spend time in a dirt lot doing lots of slow circles and figure eights. Practice standing up, skidding (rear brake) and anything that will help you to learn to balance the bike going slow. Even if you have ridden a bunch on other bikes, take the time to get used to this.

2. Head up Hwy 33, north of Ojai to Ballinger Canyon OHV park and do some of the easy trails and just "poke around" up and down a few small hills. Carizzo Plain is not much further if you have the time.

3. Hungry Valley OHV Park (Gorman) has lots of trails, hills and sand to build your skills and confidence. Be sure to adjust your air pressure so yer not going out there with super-hard tires.

4. The hills around Big Bear are also great for camping and riding. Send me a reply and maybe we can meet-up for a Noobie ride. (and that goes for you other "lurkers" too... )

5. Plan to crash and dress accordingly. Invest in good boots, gloves and pads and be sure to hydrate BEFORE and throuhgout your ride. Dehydration leads to poor reflexes and bad judgement and results in mishaps - or worse.

Hope this helps.... Have fun and let us know how you're doing...
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Old 05-19-2015, 04:37 AM   #4
Pantah
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I think it helps a lot if you have dirt riding experience, but it isn't necessary. A DOT front knobby tire is helpful in the soft areas you'll encounter. I bought a KTM 950 back in 2004 and rode it for seven years all over the continent. My habit was to read ride reports here and then work the route to try. I was always pretty careful not to get into someplace I couldn't get out of. Plus I bought map books like Delorme for the western states that I ride. AZ, UT, WY, CO and NM. These maps books have all the dirt roads in them. With a little experience, you can pretty much judge the technical difficulty of the dirt road from the maps. Eventually I acquired a GPS that I could load tracks into and started acquiring tracks from others here who were willing to share them. I've even created tracks on my computer, loaded them in my GPS and went out and rode it. It is best to have a riding buddy for that, though.

If you are up for a good trip along southern Utah to Four corners, I have a series of dirt roads that are fun on a big twin like yours. Just PM me and I'll script it for you. You'll need about 5 days for the loop, generally from St. George UT to NM and back.

Like you I ride solo mostly, so I ride much lighter dual sport bikes now. Bikes I can pick up myself. I only camp about every other day. In fact, I'd rather motel it if I can. Some of the big trips that you should consider include The Continental Divide Ride, Forever West, Parts of the TAT, parts of the Arizona Back Country Discovery Route, I think Utah has one too, but I haven't tried it. You can acquire these tracks from inmates or vendors. Have fun!
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Old 05-19-2015, 05:31 AM   #5
Not the Messiah
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Location: Melb'n, 'Straya
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Rastapapa,
the replies from the others here are good advice and some fine help to get you started, BUT
the big thing you've got to remember is that adventure riding is no bridge club, we don't have rules and there's no club coach to gently introduce to the "right" way to do it. Because there is no one "right" way - right is what makes YOU smile and every other buggers opinion of their right way is only relevant to them.
What all the rest of us done in some way is get out there and do it. You'll find bits you don't like and bits you do. Keep doing more of the latter and less of the former and your smile will get bigger.

Keep riding that bike and have fun.

Cheers
Brian
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Old 05-19-2015, 02:14 PM   #6
CardinalDirection
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Not the Messiah View Post
Rastapapa,
the replies from the others here are good advice and some fine help to get you started, BUT
the big thing you've got to remember is that adventure riding is no bridge club, we don't have rules and there's no club coach to gently introduce to the "right" way to do it. Because there is no one "right" way - right is what makes YOU smile and every other buggers opinion of their right way is only relevant to them.
What all the rest of us done in some way is get out there and do it. You'll find bits you don't like and bits you do. Keep doing more of the latter and less of the former and your smile will get bigger.

Keep riding that bike and have fun.

Cheers
Brian
That sounds like solid advice to me, I am a new adv rider too and i would have to say the best teacher so far has been experience. Example, I like back road riding on my cub, I don't like riding my c70 through foot deep mud.

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