ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-08-2012, 09:13 PM   #16
_Davi_
Adventurer
 
_Davi_'s Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Firenze, Italia
Oddometer: 65
The boxes are tough enough; as you discovered, however, the mounts are crap. I also discovered this last october, but that was due to getting hit by a car. I haven't yet replaced them, but this really makes me want to upgrade, especially how much the OEMs cost. At least make the mounting hardware replaceable!
_Davi_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2012, 10:51 PM   #17
markjenn
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
Oddometer: 10,308
The difficulty in these things is that one man's "first gentle bump" on the trail might be a bigger hit than 90% of riders would subject the bike to through its entire life. No matter how you design something, there is someone out there who will break it. And perhaps this bag was the 1 in 100 that was defective.

Personally, I don't hold the mfgs that closely to being able to regularly do the activities in their ads. It's common sense that if you regularly subjected vehicles to the abuse you see in their advertisements, they'd be smoking heaps in a short time. Anybody who rides a GS or S10 at a serious fast pace in technical dirt is going to break things.... often. This much weight with this little suspension travel just overwhelms the structure.

All the OEM bags on the heavyweight adventure bikes from BMW, Yamaha, KTM, and Triumph are pretty light duty. If you ride the bike seriously hard, you likely will find their limits. But for most, they'll probably give good service. The aftermarket stuff does tend to be more rugged, but you may the price is more weight. And there are a few aftermarket bags lying on the side of the road too.

I trust Yamaha will cover it.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2012, 04:06 PM   #18
GrahamD
Beastly Adventurer
 
GrahamD's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Blue Mnts Ozstralia
Oddometer: 5,007
+1.

The YAMAHA cases have been found to do better than other OEM plastic cases by a small margin, but they are all a but sus for serious stuff.

I think the YAMAHA and some BMW boxes are made by the same people,
__________________
"It's better to ride a boring bike than push an interesting one" ... Canuman

"I just may as well admit that my other bikes are toast. I don't ride them. Plain and simple. I didn't want this. It wasn't the plan." - snakebitten
GrahamD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2012, 06:14 AM   #19
pyplinr OP
Ta Ta Toofey
 
pyplinr's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Houston, Texas
Oddometer: 40
The latest

Good news

Quote below from Yamaha QA, they will replace the broken case... Good on Yamaha USA


Quote from email----

Hello,

I have called this part back on 5/09/12. Once the call tag is printed I can pay this claim. If anyone has any questions please let me know.

ADM 85 PL 1010 RQDT 05/09/2012 CAT 04 DLR 005160 REQ 2596337B ST H AUT ........
ALAMO CYCLE-PLEX SOLD 04/01/1996 FAIL 02/27/2012 FIN 04/29/2012
SAN ANTONIO TX 78230 CD 96A ID QA111 0999999 PART M/H 00099
BTC Y DISP H HOLD FOR PARTS REASON 3 REGNL EVALUATION PARTS CD 1 ALL TYPE
PLASTIC BROKE

SENT PICTURES OF PART TO DIANNA WEBB

000000

PART NBR DESCRIPTION QTY
23PF84B8T000 SIDE CASE RIGHT KI 001

Thank you,
Dianna Webb
Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A.
QA Claims - Accessories and Apparel
6555 Katella Ave.
Cypress, CA. 90630
714-761-7478
Fax - 714-761-6187
pyplinr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2012, 07:19 AM   #20
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 15,991
My experience has been good with the factory bags. I had three gallons of gas
on top (one and a half each side) and other gear going through baja. Dropped the
bike several times and honestly was doing over 80 on some bad washboard the
bags held up great. Can't say the same for the BMW trying to hang with the Tenere.

You will notice his side bag that was picked up by the KTM rider on the side of the road.



That's a loaded bike resting on the factory bag.





pluric is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2012, 11:33 AM   #21
CafeRacer99
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Las Vegas
Oddometer: 372
Good to hear Yamaha is taking care of you.

Out of curiosity, are you going to give the stock bags another chance, or switch to another brand?
__________________
Ride to Coffee
Coffee to Ride
CafeRacer99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2012, 06:34 PM   #22
pyplinr OP
Ta Ta Toofey
 
pyplinr's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Location: Houston, Texas
Oddometer: 40
Cases

Quote:
Originally Posted by CafeRacer99 View Post
Good to hear Yamaha is taking care of you.

Out of curiosity, are you going to give the stock bags another chance, or switch to another brand?

So I'm undecided...

I bought a set of Trax Evo cases with SW Motech mounts and I dont like the way the mounts align with the bike or the overall width of the bike now (they V out like a "toe out" condition when viewed from the back, the exhaust side more so than the right side). So I ordered some Hepco brackets and a DIY kit from Caribou, I'm going to see how a set of Pelican 1430 small top loaders line up and look on the bike (I recently mounted a Pelican Storm 2200 as a top case and like the look with the black bike. http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...279286&page=64


So with the combination of all the parts I'm going to see what I like the best and go with it.

Needless to say at some point in time I will have some new or barely used cases (New Trax Evos 37L silver in boxes/New Right Side OEM S10 Yamaha case likely in box and a lightly used exhaust side Yamaha OEM S10 case) and associated mounting equipment (Slightly used Yamaha OEM S10 mounts/Installed but not used SW Motech S10 mounts) to sell on here at a discount $$$
pyplinr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2012, 05:33 AM   #23
protondecay123
Gnarly Adventurer
 
protondecay123's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Northwest Arkansas
Oddometer: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfslater98 View Post
Indeed. BMW would NEVER make a mistake like that. Those Vario cases are tough...



With their thick, er, plastic cases and um, aluminum, uh panels. Yep, all set for off road. Micatech? Jesse? Psssht, overkill I tell you!
__________________
Sometimes the Lights are all Shinin' on Me
Other times I can barely see
Lately It Occurs to Me
What a Long, Strange Trip it's Been!
protondecay123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2012, 10:53 AM   #24
markjenn
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
Oddometer: 10,308
I just got back from a 3K mile trip with the Yamaha OEM side cases where about half the miles were on gravel, dirt, or extremely broken pavement. Some of the roads were incredibly rough, particularly a run out through the New Idria mine site near Coalinga CA. I probably had 15-lbs of weight in one side, 12-lbs in the other. While I didn't hammer the bike over the rough stuff, I didn't baby it either. I just gave the bags and mounts a careful inspection and everything is intact.

That doesn't mean then won't break tomorrow though. They sure look like a light-duty design.

Glad Yamaha is taking care of this. I think they'd warranty almost anything during that first year, but that first year goes by quickly. If YES would cover the OEM luggage (I assume it would), this might be another reason to get it.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2012, 04:16 PM   #25
tomatocity
Retired and lovin' it
 
tomatocity's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Sacramento CA
Oddometer: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
I just got back from a 3K mile trip with the Yamaha OEM side cases where about half the miles were on gravel, dirt, or extremely broken pavement. Some of the roads were incredibly rough, particularly a run out through the New Idria mine site near Coalinga CA. I probably had 15-lbs of weight in one side, 12-lbs in the other. While I didn't hammer the bike over the rough stuff, I didn't baby it either. I just gave the bags and mounts a careful inspection and everything is intact.

That doesn't mean then won't break tomorrow though. They sure look like a light-duty design.

Glad Yamaha is taking care of this. I think they'd warranty almost anything during that first year, but that first year goes by quickly. If YES would cover the OEM luggage (I assume it would), this might be another reason to get it.

- Mark
I rode New Idria Road on May 12th and it is rough. Loosened my mirrors. It is a road of patches and a portion of it has dirt two track on the side of it. Rode out slower and used the two track as much as I could. On the way back I rode 50-60 mph and smoothed the ride and increased the smile. Did not two track. My OEM side cases performed very well and one was loaded with G17 and ammo, too many tools, and both had a test load for an upcoming trip.

New Idria, http://goo.gl/maps/F0Ur
A: Corbin Saddles
B: Tres Pinos - Flapjacks Country Cafe (VERY good food and outdoor dining)
C: Where the REALLY rough begins
D: Where I got to and that was TOO far. Thought my OEM side cases were going to get a taste of dirt

Mark when were you there? How far did you ride into the mine area? Would have been cool to share the back roads with another rider. Saw a 2up RT go in but dig not see it come out.
__________________
Tim

2012 Yamaha Super Tenere #027, 2005 KLR, 1993 Chevrolet S10,
tomatocity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2012, 05:09 PM   #26
markjenn
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
Oddometer: 10,308
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomatocity View Post
Mark when were you there? How far did you ride into the mine area? Would have been cool to share the back roads with another rider. Saw a 2up RT go in but dig not see it come out.
Rode through the area about four day ago (May 24). I rode up to the mine from the Panoche Hills/I-5 side, spent a half hour poking around, then rode over the hill to 25 on Clear Creek Road through the mining area.

I was alone and the road got nasty enough for a bike like the S10 that I probably should have turned around and gone back the way I came, but the thought of riding 70 miles back on such rough roads was too much to bear. But it was 10 or so miles of dealing with crap like this. No way I'd want to be back there after any kind of rain.



Back on topic, if the OEM bags can deal with this, they're probably good to go for most, although if you tackle really rough terrain at speed, I'm sure you can break them. But when you do, you're probably at the point where your rims are likely at risk too. (I just checked my rims and now with 10K miles, they're still good - I tightened a couple spokes slightly before the trip, but otherwise, they've been maintenance free.)

One aside about the S10 and its low-speed plonking performance - it vastly exceeded my expectations. A few times as I was picking my way up a hill avoiding the worst of the ruts I really lugged the engine WAY down. I knew I should have clutched up, but I was too busy keeping the bike upright to deal with anything else and somehow it pulled through under load with the RPM's basically just off idle. Pretty amazing motor.

- Mark

markjenn screwed with this post 05-27-2012 at 05:15 PM
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2012, 05:19 PM   #27
tomatocity
Retired and lovin' it
 
tomatocity's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Sacramento CA
Oddometer: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Rode through the area about four day ago (May 24). I rode up to the mine from the Panoche Hills/I-5 side, spent a half hour poking around, then rode over the hill to 25 on Clear Creek Road through the mining area.

I was alone and the road got nasty enough for a bike like the S10 that I probably should have turned around and gone back the way I came, but the thought of riding 70 miles back on such rough roads was too much to bear. But it was 10 or so miles of dealing with crap like this. No way I'd want to be back there after any kind of rain.



Back on topic, if the OEM bags can deal with this, they're probably good to go for most, although if you tackle really rough terrain at speed, I'm sure you can break them. But when you do, you're probably at the point where your rims are likely at risk too. (I just checked my rims and now with 10K miles, they're still good - I tightened a couple spokes slightly before the trip, but otherwise, they've been maintenance free.)

One aside about the S10 and its low-speed plonking performance - it vastly exceeded my expectations. A few times as I was picking my way up a hill avoiding the worst of the ruts I really lugged the engine WAY down. I knew I should have clutched up, but I was too busy keeping the bike upright to deal with anything else and somehow it pulled through under load with the RPM's basically just off idle. Pretty amazing motor.

- Mark
You are one tough dude. Up that road is where I turned around. "Alone' was my concern.
__________________
Tim

2012 Yamaha Super Tenere #027, 2005 KLR, 1993 Chevrolet S10,
tomatocity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2012, 05:44 PM   #28
Old Git Ray
Now retired...YeeHaa
 
Old Git Ray's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: UK based, Touring the Americas
Oddometer: 1,332
Yamaha are aware that their cases are flawed in the fixings department.

IIRC, when they first did the press/publicity 'Ride for Life' with Randy Mamola from the UK to Africa, 2 of the riders had a similar problem following crashes. The general problem is the lack of any sort of fixing at the rear lower corner. If the bike falls on a clump of earth or rock in that region, the inward torque is sufficient to snap the top rail fixing off.
I suggest in your case, it was the weight combined with the bottom out that produced the same effect.

Either way, they are a massive let down for a bike of its stature. They are made by SHAD as I believe are the BMW ones.
__________________
Karen "Oh my God, I am traveling with a f**king idiot."
Blog: http://www.raykarenhall.blogspot.com
Old Git Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2012, 08:27 PM   #29
markjenn
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Swellvue, WA
Oddometer: 10,308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Git Ray View Post
Yamaha are aware that their cases are flawed in the fixings department.

IIRC, when they first did the press/publicity 'Ride for Life' with Randy Mamola from the UK to Africa, 2 of the riders had a similar problem following crashes. The general problem is the lack of any sort of fixing at the rear lower corner. If the bike falls on a clump of earth or rock in that region, the inward torque is sufficient to snap the top rail fixing off.
Maybe we've had this discussion before, but in general, most of the OEM bags have no side-to-side support at the lower rear - they all make do with just a support from the passenger footpeg in the front. I agree it is not robust with respect to crashworthiness, but it is the key design feature that allows you to remove the bags and have no bracketry or racks extending across the rear of the bike. The OEM Yamaha panniers (and the BMW ones for that matter) are designed as panniers, not crash bars.

I'd characterize it as a design tradeoff, not a flaw.

And this thread started with someone who had a bag fail simply due to rough terrain, not crashing.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2012, 07:27 AM   #30
Old Git Ray
Now retired...YeeHaa
 
Old Git Ray's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: UK based, Touring the Americas
Oddometer: 1,332
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Maybe we've had this discussion before, but in general, most of the OEM bags have no side-to-side support at the lower rear - they all make do with just a support from the passenger footpeg in the front. I agree it is not robust with respect to crashworthiness, but it is the key design feature that allows you to remove the bags and have no bracketry or racks extending across the rear of the bike. The OEM Yamaha panniers (and the BMW ones for that matter) are designed as panniers, not crash bars.

I'd characterize it as a design tradeoff, not a flaw.

And this thread started with someone who had a bag fail simply due to rough terrain, not crashing.

- Mark
I wholly agree. Especially with the tradeoff thing and not being designed as crash bars. Flawed was perhaps the wrong word for me to use. Either way, his pannier should have taken more punishment than it did before it failed.
__________________
Karen "Oh my God, I am traveling with a f**king idiot."
Blog: http://www.raykarenhall.blogspot.com
Old Git Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014