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Old 06-01-2015, 04:33 PM   #1
TinyBear OP
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Well that was fun now advice?

Few years back I got hit by the tipical left turn into my path didn't see ha jazz. Took a year to walk again and years more to gain most my mobility back.

While recovering I picked up my current DR650se for its added leg room and lighter weight compared to the CBF600 I had(since traded the CBF for my Victory as my legs couldn't take the bend due to the injuries).

Well few weeks ago i decided to try going off pavement with the DR650. After all i have a duelsport why not give it a go. I purchased good MX boots for myself (need all I can get to protect my weaker leg now) I wore my joe rocket ballistics pants and jacket. Strapped on joe rocket gloves and my Shoie Hornet DS lid and off I went to the localish off road park (actually took bike there in my truck as I figured I'd play it safe). The trails are all nicley groomed sand and though I was very shakey to start I was getting more and more comfy as I went along. Was having a blast but couldn't really shift so for most part I left the DR in second and let the big thumper pull me along. Eventually I started getting comfy and shortly there after I was sliding the rear end about giggling like a school girl.

And then it happened, I got cocky went into the next 90* banked left hotter then the rest and slid the bike out too much getting the front and rear tires stuck in opposite tracks. Next thing I knew I was on my ass and the bike shot off into the bushes lol.

I got up just fine all relatively unharmed. Just some deep tissue bruising to my left buttocks and thigh and a scrapped knee. Even the bike managed all right. Left hand hard slightly scuffed and knocked one signal light out.

All that was left was to pick up the DR spin it around and get back to the trail. And for the first time I realized why you all say the DR s are so heavy. Pick one up off camber and drag it up hill. Even though I 6' 260lbs and have a heavier upper body build that was bloody hard work lol. I was able to finish that trail uneventfully bust was really too exhausted after to continue on to there other trails. So after only maybe an 1.5 hrs riding I loaded up the bike in the truck and headed for home.


Now I left thinking we're to go from here. I have decided I LOVE off-roading and would like to continue. My girlfriend has offered to send me for off road rider training (looking forward to that). I wondering if my current gear is sufficient (sitting down was painful for weeks lol). And lastly I wondering if maybe I should trade off my DR for something smaller and lighter.

Problem with a smaller bike though is again I'm 260lbs. Also money is not easily freed up as well I was off work for over a year in my past accident and I'm still trying to recover from that (physically and financially)


So what say you. Should I take the training and stick with my DR and maybe get some better gear (any advice on gear for a BIG guy).
Or take training and maybe trade my DR too a downsized toy that may struggle for daily use (commuting in the city essentially).
Or even try modding my DR to be a bit lighter with a little better suspension (on the street she just seems too soft but with my weight most bikes are lol).
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Old 06-01-2015, 06:28 PM   #2
LittlePosum
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Hold on to your Victory for road rides ditch the DR and pick a 2smoker for the trail.
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Old 06-01-2015, 07:32 PM   #3
NJ-Brett
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The right tires help a lot in the dirt.
I expect you would get better and stronger after doing more dirt riding, you learn to relax and not fight the bike as much, and the body gets used to the work of dirt riding.

A dr650 can hurt you easy.
I had one a few years ago, great bike in every respect, but a heavy bike with DUAL SPORT tires is a bad combination.
A big guy needs a bigger bike, but at least put knobbies on it.
And there are bikes that are lighter and have more power and better suspension for guys who want to go fast.
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:05 PM   #4
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If you like the DR and its street ability have you considered picking up just an inexpensive dirt bike as a supplemental bike? You can get bikes like a KDX200 that will be a blast on the trails for $1200-$1500 if you keep your eye out. They are inexpensive to maintain, lightweight, easy to ride and will make the DR feel like the titanic off-road. Just something to consider. Depending on your state they come factory with lights, you could easily add signals and get it plated. Not a great road bike but if you live close to the trails then it makes it so convenient.
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Old 06-02-2015, 01:09 AM   #5
riverflow
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I ride my F650 everywhere dirt bikes go around here. I've never had much issue with it, but I drop it a lot since it's so tall. Lighter bikes are a lot easier to pick up. Wouldn't want to hurt your leg again trying to get back upright.

If you keep watching, you can pick up a cheap dirt bike for $600 or less. Or ride whatcha brung.
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Old 06-02-2015, 04:10 AM   #6
TinyBear OP
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Sorry forgot to mention I have my DR650 riding on Kenda 270s. A knobby duelsport tire. Also though I suppose I don't Need it to be street legal it would be preferred. And adding an additional bike to the garage is NOT an option no more room or money. So if I do swap bikes it will replace the DR and be limited to about $3000-$3500 max (what I can get for my DR ruffly).

As for riding gear. What are you guys all riding with off road? Because my street gear left a bit to be desired.
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Old 06-02-2015, 04:12 AM   #7
JettPilot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyBear View Post
And then it happened, I got cocky went into the next 90* banked left hotter then the rest and slid the bike out too much getting the front and rear tires stuck in opposite tracks. Next thing I knew I was on my ass and the bike shot off into the bushes lol.
Your reckless, over confident attitude is your biggest risk. Your first dirt ride, and you are in sand and sliding the back, etc. etc. The result was very obvious. You need to do easier stuff, and slow down, stay out of sand, and just be very careful. Unless you like being injured and not riding.....

I have no doubt you will slow down, either because you figure it out, or because you cant ride. Don't know which, but it will happen...

I know my post is kind of harsh, I am not trying to be an ass, but its better to tell people what they need to hear rather than what they want to hear.

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Old 06-02-2015, 05:18 AM   #8
Not the Messiah
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What Jettpilot said. Learn to walk before you try running.

Your gear is headed in the right direction, starting with the boots. Big tick.
Did your knee(s) suffer in the previous life? Knee braces might be worthy.
For upper body, I always liked a Dianese safety suit thing. Sorta like a mesh jersey with spine protector, gut belt, elbow guards, shoulder guards etc all in one. Then wear a ordinary jersey or light jacket or whatever over the top
AND a neck brace. Got to have one. Spend a heap of time checking them out and get one to suit your body shape and fit your helmet. I've spend four months visiting a mate in spinal rehab and scared the shite out of me. When neck braces cost about half of the cost of a helmet, you've just got to have one.

Good luck with it all, remember the 3 things that will make you a better rider: practice, practice, practice

Cheers
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Old 06-02-2015, 07:14 AM   #9
RZRob
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Crashing is a virtually inevitable part of riding in the dirt. The bigger they come, the [easier and] harder they fall. Just accept this and ride accordingly. I ride a proper dirt bike (Honda 450R) and a dual sport (650L) and the big bike can be a hand full in the dirt. Truth is I have a KTM1190R, but I'm still trying to figure out just how much dirt I can handle with that beast. My biggest fear is getting out of the way when something goes sour, and paying for it (bike and body damage) afterwards. I'm not getting rid of the smaller bikes.

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Old 06-02-2015, 07:33 AM   #10
psmcd
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The DR is capable in rough terrain, if you ride it precisely, smoothly, and within its limits. Sliding, hitting berms, jumping etc can be done in a limited fashion but its asking for trouble on a heavy bike. Even with correct spring rates and valving this bike still prefers you choose the smoothest pace and path. If you're set on dirt biking you'll be better off with a lighter bike. That said, the DR is a great dual sport that gets you there on the road and lets you explore (not race) off road. Mine was well suited for a recent 150 mile ride, 40 on dirt including a steep, tight switch back mine road to 9,500' and lots of 2 track and single track. If you want to ride the road, and just trail ride it may serve you well. If you're younger, and want to gas it a lot, go lighter.
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Old 06-02-2015, 07:37 AM   #11
NJ-Brett
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I had those same tires on my dr650 when I got 8 major bones broken plus internal injuries in a low speed fall.
High side into the next sandy whoop at 20 mph?

Tall heavy bike, high side from the top of one 3 foot whoop into the next one
with the 360 pound DR drilling me into the ground.

I did not have a problem going fast on the dr, hit over 100 mph on the speedo in the dirt (smooth road), had no problems dead lifting it (before the crash), enjoyed the power (pumper carb) had upgraded suspension, the weight was NO issue till that fall.

The Kenda 270's and the Shinko look a likes are not sand tires and its a very bad idea to run them on the front in the sand at speed.
My current xt200 (220 pounds of raw power) has a non dot dirt knobby on the front and a shinko dual sport tire on the back.
having the back wash out is fun, the front, not so much...

The dr650 is a great bike for big guys to explore off road on, its not a motocross bike which is a bit like what it sounded like you were doing with it.
For racing others on a track, and just going fast off road, most guys seem to go orange or not street legal.

Another thought, I have never been hurt in 40 years of street riding, but my body is all beat up from dirt riding and I got two helicopter rides to the hospital...


Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyBear View Post
Sorry forgot to mention I have my DR650 riding on Kenda 270s. A knobby duelsport tire. Also though I suppose I don't Need it to be street legal it would be preferred. And adding an additional bike to the garage is NOT an option no more room or money. So if I do swap bikes it will replace the DR and be limited to about $3000-$3500 max (what I can get for my DR ruffly).

As for riding gear. What are you guys all riding with off road? Because my street gear left a bit to be desired.
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Old 06-02-2015, 08:13 AM   #12
LittleRedToyota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyBear View Post
So if I do swap bikes it will replace the DR and be limited to about $3000-$3500 max (what I can get for my DR ruffly).
you should swap bikes. the DR is not a dirt bike. it sounds like you want a dirt bike. you want someting that is well under 300lbs.

for $3,500, you can find something like a used KTM 450/5xx EXC if you are patient (husaberg, husky, etc. also have similar bikes that would suit you well). those are real dirt bikes with license plates and have plenty of umph to carry your 260lbs around. if you can plate 2 strokes in your state, that opens up a whole bunch more possibilities...primarily the 300s from KTM, etc.

Quote:
As for riding gear. What are you guys all riding with off road? Because my street gear left a bit to be desired.
i wear a "pressure suit". specifically, i wear an alpinestars bionic II:

http://www.revzilla.com/product/alpi...erName=VigLink

unfortunately, they stopped making them. but there are plenty of other pressure suits out there. not sure which one i will get next time since AS stopped making that one.

if it's really hot, i don't wear anything over it. on cooler days, i wear an MX jersey over it. my camelbak fits over it well.

the other option for upper body protection is a "chest protector" and separate elbow guards. (some guys don't wear any elbow protection. i don't know how they get away with it. my elbows would be shattered by now if i didn't.) the advantage of a CP over a pressure suit is that they are cooler. chest protectors don't provide as much spine protection as pressure suits, though. and standalone elbow guards tend to move around and also can cause arm pump. the built in elbow guards in pressure suits stay put much better and don't cause arm pump.

on my bottom half, i wear gaerne SG10 boots. they provide very good protection and are still quite comfy. i cannot recommend them strongly enough. there are other good boots, though, made by companies like SIDI, Alpinestars, etc. (imho...don't spend less than $300 on boots. the cheaper boots do NOT provide nearly as much protection as a good boot. and focus on how much protection they provide, not how good are for hiking around in. for the most part, boots that are comfy for walking around don't really provide much protection...though the SG10s seem to be an exception--they definitely provide good protection and, while certainly not a hiking boot, aren't too bad for walking around in at all.)

i wear knee/shin guards. mine are alpinestars, but they seem to have stopped making those, too. similar to these, though:

https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p...=knee%20guards

(you can also get more expensive knee braces that provide impact protection like the above guards and also provide stability against twisting your knee. i've always found just the guards to be adequate, personally, though.)

and i wear MX pants.

i also have a pair of armored shorts, but i don't wear them anymore. they're a little hot, and i never seem to hit the places they protect anyway.

http://www.alpinestars.com/bionic-fr...1#.VW3GiUarFmA

oh, and an MX helmet and gloves, of course. i wear goggles for racing, but just safety glasses (much cooler than goggles) for trail riding.

anyway, dirt riding is an absolute blast. way, way more fun that road riding, imho. get a lighter dirt bike...get some good dirt gear...get some training...and be prepared to have more fun than anyone has to right to have.

oh...tires...the 270s are NOT dirt tires. you want to get some knobbies. most DOT knobbies (i.e., ones that are actually legal to use on the street) are not as good in dirt as real dirt knobbies, but there are some that are decent. the pirelli XCMH front is a good dirt tire and decent street tire that, relative to other DOT knobbies, actually lasts a pretty decently long time. the XCMH rear is an OK dirt tire that does decent on the street and lasts pretty well for a DOT knobby. the kenda trakmaster II rear is a better dirt tire (maybe the best rear DOT knobby in dirt), but wears quickly on too much pavement. (the TMII front is a horrible tire, though...possibly the worst tire ever made.)

(the dunlop d606 is a popular choice for DOT knobbies. in my experience, the rear is a decent tire...about on part with an XCMH rear, but not as good in wet dirt/mud. the front is a pretty bad dirt tire--washes out a lot. it does handle on pavement a bit better than an XCMH front, but wears out twice as fast. for some reason the 606 front cups badly quickly...and it is a unidirectional tire, so you can't even flip it around to counter the cupping.)
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Old 06-02-2015, 12:08 PM   #13
road_apple
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Read this:

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=703845

+2 Get a neck brace, nothing worse than a vertebrae compression to ruin your day.

It's not the bike it's the rider. Should you have a DR or a KTM?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJMYMC4jxKM
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Old 06-02-2015, 12:23 PM   #14
LittleRedToyota
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Originally Posted by road_apple View Post
It's not the bike it's the rider.
it's both.

there is a reason you don't see any DRs in GNCCs, MX, etc.

yes, a very good rider on a DR can outride a not-so-good rider on {insert any other bike here}. that doesn't tell you squat about the bikes, though...or which is more appropriate for someone who is looking for a dirt bike.

especially for learning, light weight and good suspension are extremely important (the DR has neither)...as in keep you out of the hospital important. it is borderline irresponsible to not own up to that when giving advice to noobs.

Quote:
Should you have a DR or a KTM?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJMYMC4jxKM
fun video, but there is not a single actually difficult piece of trail in the entire thing. (and, if you actually take that video seriously, you might want to read the introduction the guy who posted it wrote on youtube. great, funny video for what it is, but you seem to be thinking it is something it is actually not.)
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Old 06-02-2015, 02:52 PM   #15
imprezagm4
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I agree with the sentiment. I love my DR650 and ride it the way it was designed. I'm more about exploring forest roads and some technical two track... slowly. I'm not a good dirt rider and I know it, so I keep the speed down and enjoy the scenery.
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