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Old 07-14-2012, 04:16 PM   #61
adam_c_eckhardt OP
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Originally Posted by Dave View Post
I'm curious about your in-slab tubing. I'm having a garage pad poured in a couple of weeks, and I've opted to have it insulated and to run radiant tubing in it. I'm not installing a heating source yet, but I want to have it for an option in the future.

Good idea- in the long run even if you never end up using it, it's not a lot of money out of pocket.

The insulation part is easy, but regarding the tubing, I know there are a couple of kinds. There's a certain kind of radiant floor tubing I've used in the past. Unlike PEX, it's opaque, and it seems to be flexier, and doesn't kink nearly as easily as PEX. So, is PEX favored now, or is it one of those solutions that's 95% as good, but 30% the cost.

Not too sure about that to be honest. We did a little bit of shopping around and found a source that sells what seems to be a higher quality PEX. Basically it's got thicker walls. We managed to do all of ours without any kinks- just takes a little extra care when making your tight bends.

I'm also curious about the layout. You mentioned spacing, but what are the guidelines for that? Is there a certain number of lineal feet in a loop that's recommended?

I can't remember the exact number, but they didn't recommend going over a certain distance for any loop. That basement zone is 3 loops, and they're all equal in distance, which is most important (they say- I'm just repeating what I've been told). They also advised us on the spacing, which varies based on what size PEX you're running, and if you're going in slab or staple up. There are other factors as well, but you'll find out about those when you have someone design the system for you.

Your loops appear to be under the steel mesh, and zip tied to it. I know that will give the mesh a bit of lift up into the concrete, but getting it under the mesh must have been a cast iron PITA. (or, did you fasten it to the insulation, lay the mesh, then zip tie it?

What we ended up doing was fastening the PEX to the insulation first. Nothing fancy- just put weights on it to hold it close to where we wanted it. Once we got enough out to lay in a few sheets of mesh we did that, finalized the position, and zip tied it all in. It wasn't so bad with 3 people. There are also nice little plastic clips that will hold down the tubing to the insulation, and if I were to do this again and do it alone, I'd go that route. We actually used a few of those clips, but didn't have enough to do the entire floor.

I'm not going to lie, it got to be a huge pain in the ass toward the end because you essentially work yourself into a corner or narrow strip and that took some time and there was some cursing.
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Old 07-14-2012, 04:48 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by adam_c_eckhardt View Post
We've talked to two well companies and will be punching a hole in the ground in the next few

Pictures by the end of the weekend!
That brings up a question (keep in mind I can't see any of your pics on this lousy mobile device)- ideally you'd bring the water supply in below grade and turn it up inside the basement. But you've poured the slab already, how do you plan on bringing that in?

I need to fire up the PC and look at your pics. As an architect, I always thought in the back of mind someday I'd design and build my own house. Sadly it seems that will never happen. I'm a little envious but happy that you are doing this.
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Old 07-14-2012, 05:03 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geode View Post

many systems have balancing valves on the feed side of each loop so the system can be fine tuned at start-up.

btdt
Yup! We've got balancing valves installed in that manifold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Wi View Post
But you've poured the slab already, how do you plan on bringing that in?

I need to fire up the PC and look at your pics. As an architect, I always thought in the back of mind someday I'd design and build my own house. Sadly it seems that will never happen. I'm a little envious but happy that you are doing this.
Personally I prefer to bring the water line in through a wall instead of under the slab. The less stuff under the slab, the better, in my opinion. I work for the local water/sewer department and have seen too many people have to repair water service lines that run under their slabs. Many people opt to abandon the old line a run a new line in through the wall.

On this site we are back filling the upper side- I plan on running the water line up behind the house and in through the wall near the slab. We'll have enough cover to protect against freezing, plus we're insulating the line just in case.
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:56 PM   #64
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The insulation part is easy, but regarding the tubing, I know there are a couple of kinds. There's a certain kind of radiant floor tubing I've used in the past. Unlike PEX, it's opaque, and it seems to be flexier, and doesn't kink nearly as easily as PEX. So, is PEX favored now, or is it one of those solutions that's 95% as good, but 30% the cost.


Certainly no expert here but I do know with some heat sources (cast Iron boiler) oxygen barrier pex is recommended to prevent corrosion in the boiler system.
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Old 07-15-2012, 05:01 AM   #65
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Certainly no expert here but I do know with some heat sources (cast Iron boiler) oxygen barrier pex is recommended to prevent corrosion in the boiler system.
Yup- we used the oxygen barrier stuff because we haven't decided on a heat source yet. We're leaning away from a boiler, so we might go with the non oxygen barrier stuff from here on out.
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:17 AM   #66
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Certainly no expert here but I do know with some heat sources (cast Iron boiler) oxygen barrier pex is recommended to prevent corrosion in the boiler system.
Oh, that's right. It'd been about 6-7 years since I did my last system. I knew it was different from regular PEX for some reason. Oxygen barrier.

Damned crusty old brain.
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Old 07-15-2012, 02:23 PM   #67
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So I ended up buying a Rigid job site table saw. It seems to be OK for what it is- no complaints. In fact it has a few nice features over the other ones that were available, so for now it'll do. Can't wait to trade it on a real one when we're done!

So here you can see that the walls are growing, and the vertical re-bar is all in place. You can also see that I've built all the window bucks and put them near where they go.

From July 15, 2012


And a close up of a small window buck that's in place. It hasn't been leveled yet, but I just wanted to put it there so I felt like I accomplished something today.
From July 15, 2012


Also grubbed out an area for the well driller to get in. Hopefully he's happy with it because I don't feel like doing anymore. I'm anxious to move on to the septic system, back filling the house, and building my stone walls. After that I can sell the excavator. Keep that in mind fellow ADVers- you NEED this machine for projects around the house. Save yourself thousands!
From 490E
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Old 07-15-2012, 04:30 PM   #68
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Heavy equipment question: I'm wondering why you went with an excavator as opposed to say, a backhoe?

The excavator has limited applications for a homeowner - essentially early phases of construction. The average homeowner won't have the equipment to transport it and it's limited to off pavement work.

A backhoe is more versatile and could be kept after construction's completed to finish landscaping and even use for snow clearing (even turn it into a side business).
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Old 07-15-2012, 05:05 PM   #69
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What would something like that sell for?
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:07 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardware02 View Post
Heavy equipment question: I'm wondering why you went with an excavator as opposed to say, a backhoe?

The excavator has limited applications for a homeowner - essentially early phases of construction. The average homeowner won't have the equipment to transport it and it's limited to off pavement work.

A backhoe is more versatile and could be kept after construction's completed to finish landscaping and even use for snow clearing (even turn it into a side business).
Good question. Currently my job title is "heavy equipment operator" and I work for a water/sewer department. While I don't run equipment everyday I've become quite familiar with it. You make all valid points, but at the end of the day an excavator can do work MUCH faster than a backhoe. There are times when I wish I had a front bucket, but for the most part this machine has already paid for itself. This land has some seriously uneven areas to it, and there's no way you could get a backhoe through or to some of them. So that's my reason for the excavator in this case. Plans are to sell it in a few months and pick up a compact utility tractor in the 35 HP range- ideally with a backhoe on it.

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What would something like that sell for?
ADV special- $17,999
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:15 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adam_c_eckhardt View Post
Good question. Currently my job title is "heavy equipment operator" and I work for a water/sewer department. While I don't run equipment everyday I've become quite familiar with it. You make all valid points, but at the end of the day an excavator can do work MUCH faster than a backhoe. There are times when I wish I had a front bucket, but for the most part this machine has already paid for itself. This land has some seriously uneven areas to it, and there's no way you could get a backhoe through or to some of them. So that's my reason for the excavator in this case. Plans are to sell it in a few months and pick up a compact utility tractor in the 35 HP range- ideally with a backhoe on it.



ADV special- $17,999
Makes sense.

That's cheap for a 490E (I think).
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:25 PM   #72
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Makes sense.

That's cheap for a 490E (I think).
I think it may be worth a bit more (especially with the hydraulic thumb), but I'd seriously sell it to an inmate for that. I want it gone in less than 100 hours of run time.
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:32 PM   #73
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Thanks for the info, looks like a nice machine.
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:52 PM   #74
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What year is your excavator and how many hours on it ?
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Old 07-15-2012, 08:14 PM   #75
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I think it may be worth a bit more (especially with the hydraulic thumb), but I'd seriously sell it to an inmate for that. I want it gone in less than 100 hours of run time.
Epic fly 'n ride trip report opportunity.
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