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Old 07-12-2012, 01:34 PM   #136
Feyala OP
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Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Wandering...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nixels View Post
Ha! Evil carb boot cracks - now yer gettin' somewhere!

Back to
I wish! That gremlin's still with me...

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Originally Posted by ArizonaRoadscout View Post
Captivating story. Keep it going.
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by livewire View Post
Looks like you're getting it sorted.....be thumpin smooth in no time.
Eventually I'll figure it out, if only through virtue of replacing various things until it stops doing it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercenary View Post
Do you know the WD-40 trick? Spray some WD-40 in and around the crack in the carb boot (with the bike running...) and if the idle increases...then you've got a leak.

Mind you....I suppose you've already got it sorted out considering you're still writing about May's adventures......

Anyway...a neat little trick to keep in mind.
I have heard of this, and it's something I still need to try. I ended up replacing the carb boot entirely (cracks aren't usually a good thing) but it's still hiccuping under certain circumstances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryboy View Post
Had fun hanging out, finally somebody in the warehouse understands how to sleep in.
Life is too short for early mornings unless it's really hot outside or there's money involved. I had fun hanging out with you too!

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Originally Posted by Radioman View Post
You two?
Pffft. Mind in the gutter!

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Originally Posted by ScootTour View Post
I will have to read this full report more later I got a few stories in. The one burning question I have is this.

If money was less of an issue would you still rather camp (pending good camping gear) or would you rather hotel it? (say lower medium quality hotel but not sh*t dives)
This is a hard question to answer. It depends on a couple of things. Would it still be my money, or would it be some kind of expense account? And when in my trip I would indulge...

Basically, what it boils down to is that with how I live my life, I can either choose to do this awesome stuff on the cheap and experience life while I've got it, or trade my time for somebody else's profits in order to sock away slightly more money. For me, the time I don't spend working is more valuable than the night in the hotel room, so with my priorities, it isn't even a real question for me. $50 buys a lot of gasoline.

If somebody gave me an unlimited credit card and said "go nuts"? I would still probably camp a lot of the time, because I like the scenery, the solitude, and nature. In really foul weather? I'd be in a motel room more often. In cities, it's a bit more of a toss-up. You can find places like East Jesus and the Musick Box here and there, but there are a number of places where I haven't been able to find such a setup, and have either resorted to camping outside the city or getting a dive motel room. I would much rather stay at a communal house like the Musick Box over a motel - it's a way to network, to link in to other cool stuff that might be going on, and meet new people with awesome ideas.

The more I put myself at the mercy of others, the more I'm broken out of my little box of solitary self-sufficiency, the more I tend to find cool people and have great adventures, exposed to stuff that I wouldn't otherwise even encounter. This is a kind of serendipity that you won't find if you have rigid plans and hotel rooms, and it's hard to really express properly, but it's awesome when it happens. It's one of the many reasons I'm on a bike instead of in a car - it forces you to interact with your surroundings more, pushes you out of your comfort zone. It makes you vulnerable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ride4321 View Post
Subscribed!

Great report so far Fey, love your writing style. I'm always ready to learn more about living on the cheap and this seems to be the place. I think I'll be following the RR for a long time.

I'm sure you already know about the DR650 thread in the Thumper section. Those guys can help you out quick over there. Anytime I've posted a question about my DR I had an answer withing minutes.
Yeah, I posted a couple things there, but nobody had more of an idea than I did, haha. It's a mystery! Thanks for the compliments! I'll try to include more about what I eat and such...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooterchick View Post
What a great report....

I have no idea how eveyone is able to write all of this stuff out AFTER a long trip!...,My poor brain would have shut down trying to do it like that! haha.

Thanks for the details about packing and all of that. We had my top case, a small Gears brand bag on my bike and hubby had a waterproof duffle and the top part of my Gears bag on his bike. We washed once during the trip and brought things back that we never used. So, making a list like that one you suggested about checking off the things that didn't get used is a good idea. It's just hard to believe we got by on so little! I just used what is known as the "miliatry roll" when we packed everything.

We are thinking of doing a trip from British Columbia to Oklahoma where we have another home sometime next year. But the weather patterns for the heat hasn't been to faborable for a lot of the US recently. I almost cooked to death in my gear just coming back from Portand and had to ride most of the while with everything unzipped as I had already taken the inner liners out.

I'll be going back over you notes after I print them out. Thanks for the tips! There are a lot of veteran riders who have been and will be a big help to me! We have been reading notes about tents and stoves and trying to decide which one would be best for us....something that can fit both of us; or each of us having our own??

We'll have to keep reading I guess

Thanks again!

Happy Trails
Somehow that emoticon fits my ride report perfectly...

Glad to hear you had a good trip!

I'm able to do it this way because I wrote paper notes along the way about what I did each day. I just take those and use them to sort of spark my memory of what happened that day and make sure I get everything down. Journals are invaluable!

Only bother with individual tent/stove setups if you plan on taking vastly different routes (like if he's going dirt and you're going on pavement) and you both plan on camping separately. Otherwise, there's no reason IMO to double pack like that. Unless he snores really badly, I suppose...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Escaped View Post
Whoo Whoo! Thats what I would call an adventure ride! I hope you eventually found your glasses.
No.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooterchick View Post
Holy Smokes, girl! Wow....what a report!

So glad you are alright and made it through all of that. Just before you said you were almost in tears, I said to my husband that I would have been in tears at that point! haha.

What a trooper!

Thanks for taking us along, but try not to get us stuck again!....I don't like all that sand in my clothes! haha

Ride on!!
It all makes for good stories later. At least that's what I tell myself when I get into that kinda crap!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjmorel View Post

Next time this happens, check out

http://ibmwr.org/otech/pickup.html

Save your back and do it like these girls do, works, rj
I will keep this in mind, thanks for the tip! The seat was pretty much flat on the grass though, so I'm not sure how well it would have worked on that round...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulDreamRider View Post
I haven't quite figured out the no campground thing! Loaded my bike "Spirit" is about 600 lbs, and I have dropped her plenty seeing as she is top heavy. I'm just now getting "comfortable" (ahem) taking her off road by myself. Most free camping places I have seen here in Colorado require riding on dirt roads. Think I need to get my brain working and design a compact jack that will aid in lifting a bike! Hmmm.........
Dirt roads, yes. Nasty single track, no. Just keep your peepers peeled around the normal campgrounds, if you're already in a national forest you can usually go down any dirt road you see and find a place where people have camped not far off the road, and it's fair game. Not very helpful if you want to have a campfire though, particularly this time of year, given half the state is already on fire...

Bonus points for sneaking into the paid campground to use their toilets, showers (some state parks in Oregon have free hot showers!), and refill your water jugs...

600 lbs is quite a lot! Is that with you on it too, or just bike + gear?
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:48 PM   #137
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Thumbs down Strange old machine

[QUOTE=But here, have a neat old machine from one of the places I stopped to have a snack break:
[/QUOTE]

This is a steam donkey from the logging days. They would bring them in on a barge, then run out the cable, build steam and let them drag themselves to " the landing". Then the donkey would then be anchored, the main haul cable would be run out the the falling area, and green logs hauled back to the landing, following the signals from the "whistle punk"

A Steam Engineer needed to be careful though as, if the cable snagged the donkey didn't know any different, and kept on yarding until the cable snapped.The only hope was to duck behind the donkey and hope for the best!

Apparently I had a great uncle who wasn't to quick on the uptake and was decapitated thusly.

ScooterChick gets a little nervous when I am around such machines since I usually start grabbing levers, and making mechanical sounding noises....haha...even if they haven't worked for 50+ years.

In answer to your previous question, yes I do snore, quite loudly I'm told, but she has good earplugs, and sharp elbows if worse comes to worst, so we'll be using 1 tent....hahaha.
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Scootard screwed with this post 07-12-2012 at 08:12 PM
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Old 07-13-2012, 03:18 AM   #138
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Amazing read.Would love to do this one day.
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Old 07-13-2012, 05:44 AM   #139
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Thats the ticket!

I have wondered how I could do something like this and now I have figured it out. All I have to do is keep reading this RR at work. Then I will lose my job and have no excuses! Keep it coming.
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Old 07-13-2012, 06:10 AM   #140
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have not read it all yet... but cool RR so far...
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Old 07-13-2012, 12:35 PM   #141
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Feyala View Post
600 lbs is quite a lot! Is that with you on it too, or just bike + gear?
Just bike and gear. Guess I can take of most of the stuff when I drop her, but my pelicans screwed on from the inside so the one that's below the bike got to stay on, LOL I'm just gonna have to get stronger, that's all that there is to it!
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:35 PM   #142
Feyala OP
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Bus and Ride - Usal Road (May 7th)

I awoke to a balmy spring morning. After surveying the damage the wind did to my tent, I found Steve sitting on the tailgate of his truck nearby.



I like how you can tell just how broken the tent is in the second photo.

We chatted about the state of the world and how shit seems to be hitting the fan. He mentioned that he had hopes for the Occupy movement - people are getting fed up with the state of things, but that it doesn't seem to be going much of anywhere. He joked about how drunk he was the previous night - "on a whiskey diet". We also talked about how Usal Beach used to be a busy port town, and he showed me a book with history of the place, which was really awesome, and fit right in with the discussion about the pylons with the bonfire guys the night before.



I have more pages from this book! Educational!

The book tells the story of a bustling lumber town in the 1890s, plagued with difficult weather and poor quality wood. Then:

"In 1902, a fire destroyed the mill and several other buildings. What had become a thriving community was no more. The post office closed down in January 1903 when it moved to Rockport. Usal remained a small, isolated town with a ranch, store and hotel that was a stage shop. The store at Usal remained open until the early 1950s." - A Glance Back: Northern Mendocino County History

Steve offered me use of his metal detector to try to locate my missing glasses, and helped me comb the beach. I'd never used a metal detector before, it was kinda fun! We found a lot of random garbage, nails, beer caps and soda cans, but no glasses. Boo. I am supposed to have the glasses to drive, but my vision is not too bad, so I figured I would do alright. It's not like I had many options...



This is the man who saved my ass. Thanks, Steve!

One of Steve's friends stopped by to chat with him and gave me an abalone shell as a memento of my trip to the beach.



It's very pretty, but I have no idea what to do with it...

I packed up my stuff and fixed the broken fiberglass pole - I fished out the end embedded into the metal piece, crushed it to break it free, and slid the remnants of the pole down into the socket. The pole ended up about an inch and a half shorter, but it works.

While I was otherwise occupied, I heard the familiar sound of motorcycles. Two guys on KLR650s had driven up to the beach. We introduced ourselves, they were Colton and Nik. They had seen my bike from the dirt road coming down, and decided to investigate and find the owner. I'm glad they did, because they were fucking awesome. I described my earlier sand predicament, and said that if Steve didn't come by I had no idea what I would have done, to which they replied that "Well, eventually you would have figured something out, I mean, it's not like you're going to live out here. If nothing else, we would have been by this morning and would have helped pull it out", which really put a positive spin on it. After talking for a bit, we discovered that we were all heading north, so we decided to ride together.





My bike was still covered in sand from the previous evening...

They'd wanted to go along the Lost Coast, which I had never even heard of. We drove to the head of Usal Road, just past the campground, but it was marked as closed for "winter maintenance". They convinced me that it was a great idea to go along with them around the road closed sign. They'd even help me move my bike around it up that sketchy embankment! If it was too bad, they said, we could always double back and go along the 101 instead. I told them that I was utterly inexperienced in dirt, but they didn't seem to mind.



Wait, you want me to go WHERE?

Against my "better judgement", we bypassed the sign and rode about 30 miles of dirt. Shit that would have terrified me solo, that I never would have done by myself. I wanted to ease into this whole offroading thing! It really pushed the boundaries of what I was comfortable with, and I'm really glad I did. It made me laugh that I was such a pansy on the gentle graded dirt road the previous day, as I bounced around. I still went really slow. I don't think I got over 15mph more than two or three times the whole way.




Usal road wasn't unmanageable by any means, but it was still a handful for my first serious dirt ride. Mud bogs to avoid, slippery leaves, gravel, rocks. Huge ruts where streams had cut across the road, some on uphill inclines, festooned with rocks and debris. I almost lost it on a number of occasions, when the back tire would break loose, slide sideways, and I'd start slipping. I managed to gun it through most of the obstacles in my path, but still rode my brakes a lot going downhill - inertia was an enemy I didn't want to tangle with, not when the consequences are flying down a steep embankment. I only dumped the bike once, and that was going too slow through about 6 inches of mud. They pulled it upright before I had the chance to take a photo.




At one point we went around another gate, in an attempt to find an alternate route to our destination, guided by GPS, but this road was even less well-maintained and definitely not something a 4-wheeled vehicle could make it through. There was one overgrown stretch of bushes that had a sort of bike-shaped hole through the middle of it, we had to duck down as much as we could to avoid getting slapped in the face with branches. We ended up turning around from this route after it got too dicey.



I think this classifies as singletrack...



This was my first real off-road ride, and my first time riding with a group. I gained a lot of skill and confidence, and by the end of it, I was almost in second gear! Even though I was going pretty slow (from my point of view), they said that I kept up pretty well, they didn't really have to wait around very long for me to catch up. They may have just been polite, but I felt a bit better. I was given the advice to "loosen up offroad" and to "let the bike kinda ride itself". Relaxing more is important, they said, and if I do fall because I am too relaxed, it isn't the end of the world. Good advice that I still haven't figured out how to apply yet...



Thumbs up for a great ride!




I like all of the signs. Not maintained for winter travel, road closed for winter months... in May...




This was for the paved section. Apparently there's only one donkey to watch out for!




The boys were a bit more enthusiastic about the mud than I was...




...but I did not escape unscathed!

We found pavement and made our way to Shelter Cove for lunch.


I pushed myself in the paved sections (particularly the corners) to try to keep up, left to my own devices I just sort of putter along, going the speed limit or close to it. I did this to push my own skill, not because I was worried they would leave me behind. If they got too far ahead, they pulled over to wait for me.

This exposed a number of bad habits and areas of improvement. I went wide a few times discovering that I have a bad habit of braking in corners instead of before them - I know better than this! I also discovered a need to pick better lines - when I was rushing to keep up, I wasn't paying as close of attention to starting on the outside of corners, which I also know better. Hurrying made me careless and I was a worse rider because of it.

We met up with the 101 and took it up to the 36, which was a gorgeous road, one wherein Colton promised us was "the best ride of your life" further toward the 5. Definitely something I will check out when I have a bit more skill under my belt and can push it a bit more. We eventually found a place to camp in the redwoods, near the river, which was emerald green and beautiful. We made a little fire and had dinner - soup warmed in the coals, roasted corn, and a couple of drinks. Apparently Sailor Jerrys mixed with sprite tastes like cream soda, yum!


We fell asleep, peacefully by the river. Even though this was absolutely not a designated campsite, and was a stone's throw from the 36, we didn't see a soul.
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:55 PM   #143
Feyala OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scootard View Post
This is a steam donkey from the logging days. They would bring them in on a barge, then run out the cable, build steam and let them drag themselves to " the landing". Then the donkey would then be anchored, the main haul cable would be run out the the falling area, and green logs hauled back to the landing, following the signals from the "whistle punk"

A Steam Engineer needed to be careful though as, if the cable snagged the donkey didn't know any different, and kept on yarding until the cable snapped.The only hope was to duck behind the donkey and hope for the best!

Apparently I had a great uncle who wasn't to quick on the uptake and was decapitated thusly.

ScooterChick gets a little nervous when I am around such machines since I usually start grabbing levers, and making mechanical sounding noises....haha...even if they haven't worked for 50+ years.

In answer to your previous question, yes I do snore, quite loudly I'm told, but she has good earplugs, and sharp elbows if worse comes to worst, so we'll be using 1 tent....hahaha.
Awesome! I love learning little bits of history like this! Thanks for the info, and the story!

And now that I know what it's called, I can find videos of it on Youtube, because everything is on the internet!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS4cAsa7c2k

I love the sounds that old steam machines make.

Quote:
Originally Posted by me27103 View Post
Amazing read.Would love to do this one day.
DO IT!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto da Vinci View Post
I have wondered how I could do something like this and now I have figured it out. All I have to do is keep reading this RR at work. Then I will lose my job and have no excuses! Keep it coming.
It somehow fills me with joy that my antics are causing so much lost productivity...

Quote:
Originally Posted by _cy_ View Post
have not read it all yet... but cool RR so far...
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulDreamRider View Post
Just bike and gear. Guess I can take of most of the stuff when I drop her, but my pelicans screwed on from the inside so the one that's below the bike got to stay on, LOL I'm just gonna have to get stronger, that's all that there is to it!
The specs for that bike claim ~400 lbs wet weight, do you have a gigantic aftermarket gas tank, or are you really carrying 200 lbs of gear? I wouldn't be comfy with a bike that heavy off road either... Stronger is always good! But if I had that much gear I would be taking a good long look at how much of it I use...
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:11 PM   #144
Feyala OP
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Bus and Ride - Redwoods to Gold Beach (May 8th)

I awoke to rustling sounds - Nik was already packing up his gear. I could have used more sleep - 7 am is too damn early! Oh well.


As I packed up the bike, we noticed that the exhaust was missing a mounting bracket. Initially we lashed it on with paracord, but Colton remembered that he had some safety wire and we used that instead. It stabilized the exhaust surprisingly well! Way better than it was previously. We had noticed that the exhaust was a bit jiggly before jostling down Usal Road, and I have no idea how long it's been that way. Hopefully it would be okay.


Colton rode my bike up the steep goat path we took to get down to the beach after moving his own. It was amazing watching him work, as he was far, far more skilled than I am. He told me that because he's short too, people think that he can't ride well, and are surprised when he bolts past them. He did have to dab a couple of times, but it was the quick, leaping with one foot kind of dab, just to orient the bike, not out of insecurity. Someday I'll be that good.




We took a group picture on a nearby bridge, said our goodbyes, and exchanged emails. Sadly, none of my photos of this came out.

The hiccup returned, after a couple days of peace. It wasn't as bad as it had been, but still irritating. It misses more when cold, even after leaving it to warm up for a good 5 minutes, I have to stay on the throttle when coming to a stop. Curiouser and curiouser.

I rode to Fortuna and headed to a coffee shop to warm up and relax, charge my electronics, and clean up a bit. My shoulders and forearms were very sore from the workout yesterday! I got to talking to some Canadian travelers, including a man named Dan. Dan was into motorcycles as well, and I mentioned the problem with going a bit wide in corners. He recommended I check out a video called "Twist of the Wrist". I scribbled it down to look up once I got back to Portland. I used to hate talking to strangers, but I've gradually come out of my shell and found that I can learn a lot from them!

I took the 101 north from Fortuna. It was a gorgeous day, a little cold and slightly overcast, but far better than drizzly rain.



I took a break by this peaceful lake, and I'm happy I did! Very nice views.

It was VERY windy along the coast, and the surf was high.






Made it to Gold Beach, a sleepy little town I'd visited a number of times back when I used to do inventory. I'd read online about a campsite with pit toilets and a 14-day stay limit but no fees, which sounded enticing. I took Jerrys Flat road out of town eastward, until it became Forest Road 33.




Jerrys Flat was very empty, great for puttering along at 40mph and admiring the river gorge in the setting sun. Debris & poor road maintenance, rock slides, and deer proved the slow speed to be a good idea. Nice, curvy little road though, and very peaceful without any traffic. I crossed a river and took the first right onto Oak Flat Road, and the campground was at the end of it.




Oak Flat Campground was indeed as advertised - no fees for the gorgeous view of the river and mountains in the Rogue-Siskiyou forest. I set up my camp, built a fire, and relaxed.


After the camaraderie of the previous evening, I started feeling a bit lonesome without any company. I'd never really travelled with other motorcycle people before, I don't even have any local friends, save my boyfriend, who ride. It was a comforting thing, to be around people who shared my passion. I decided that I could probably make it back to Portland the next day, and settled down to sleep.



Total distance: 206 miles. (Larger Map)

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Old 07-13-2012, 09:31 PM   #145
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You are one brave soul...haha. Especially going off into the woods with people you don't know! . I'm glad they took good care of you! It's good to meet nice people along the way!

My bike is only a 250cc scooter. I dropped it once and that happened when I was getting off of it thinking that the kick stand was fully engaged. It had extra weight on the bike with the top case and another bag behind me. So, I wasn't used to the weigth having only been on it for 1 mile like that. Anyway, I decided to let the bike fall with out me than with me! But, I'm told I probably have a lot more drops ahead of me!

Nice pics and great RR too. But I don't know if I would ever do the "off road" kind of travel for long periods of time although we have been looking at tents and gear lately.

So glad you met up with some nice folks long the way. that makes for a very nice trip!

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Old 07-14-2012, 04:45 AM   #146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooterchick View Post
You are one brave soul...haha. Especially going off into the woods with people you don't know! . I'm glad they took good care of you! It's good to meet nice people along the way!

So glad you met up with some nice folks long the way. that makes for a very nice trip!

Very well stated Scooterchick. Yea, security is a "downer", but it is a necessary ingredient in any adventure. Most likely Feyala put it into the equation and has just left that part out of her report. Possibly Feyala could comment on the issue?
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:46 AM   #147
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I'm enjoying your report and amazing photos, thanks for sharing it with us!
You gotta love the Lost Coast of Northern CA. We're heading down that way next month and I hope to ride Usal Rd south from Shelter Cove. Did you get to see any of the infamous black sand beaches while in the area?
Safe travels and happy trails!
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Old 07-14-2012, 12:45 PM   #148
Feyala OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooterchick View Post
You are one brave soul...haha. Especially going off into the woods with people you don't know! . I'm glad they took good care of you! It's good to meet nice people along the way!

My bike is only a 250cc scooter. I dropped it once and that happened when I was getting off of it thinking that the kick stand was fully engaged. It had extra weight on the bike with the top case and another bag behind me. So, I wasn't used to the weigth having only been on it for 1 mile like that. Anyway, I decided to let the bike fall with out me than with me! But, I'm told I probably have a lot more drops ahead of me!

Nice pics and great RR too. But I don't know if I would ever do the "off road" kind of travel for long periods of time although we have been looking at tents and gear lately.

So glad you met up with some nice folks long the way. that makes for a very nice trip!

I once took a plane to go live with friends from the internet in Denmark for a year. Going into the woods with strangers is a relative cakewalk. I've found that most people I meet along the way are nice.

I did the kickstand drop once with my Rebel, boy was my face red. At least it didn't go all the way down and wasn't loaded, just sort of fell on my leg, haha. Drops are a fact of life, as long as nothing is actually damaged, it's mostly just exercise!

Dirt is pretty fun. I like solitude, and it seems to be a great way to get out to some campsites few others can reach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlin III View Post
Very well stated Scooterchick. Yea, security is a "downer", but it is a necessary ingredient in any adventure. Most likely Feyala put it into the equation and has just left that part out of her report. Possibly Feyala could comment on the issue?
I've given it a fair amount of thought, and will likely invest in some mace if I spend significant further time in cities. For the most part, everybody I meet is pretty benign, particularly in the middle of nowhere. What few conflicts I've had, words have resolved. I've never really feared for my life. My strategy is to not be in a position where people can sneak up on me, to be super aware of my surroundings, and to not be at the wrong place at the wrong time. This is mostly an issue in cities, and it's likely simple paranoia, given most people are benign. I just don't spend a great deal of time wandering around urban areas, and large numbers of strangers still make me a bit uncomfortable.

I like to think I'm a pretty good judge of character, and I listen to instinct when it tells me to get the hell out. It's served me well so far, and while there's always the small chance I'll find the one serial killer in the middle of nowhere, that small chance is not worth living in fear by avoiding all strangers under the assumption they mean me harm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NotAllWhoWanderRLost View Post
I'm enjoying your report and amazing photos, thanks for sharing it with us!
You gotta love the Lost Coast of Northern CA. We're heading down that way next month and I hope to ride Usal Rd south from Shelter Cove. Did you get to see any of the infamous black sand beaches while in the area?
Safe travels and happy trails!
I didn't! I want to, though! Now that I know what the Lost Coast is and have a bit more dirt skill, I want to go back and do the whole thing at some point! Have fun when you go!
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Old 07-14-2012, 02:34 PM   #149
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Well, we're hanging in there with you! Great report.....:-)

I hear you about not letting the fear one some freak incident get to you. We would all stay home and never go anywhere at all if we were ruled like that!

looking forward to the rest of your report.
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:44 PM   #150
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Feyala:

I find that most people that ride, are friendly and helpful. Sometimes it's nice to have companions, and sometimes solitude, a mixture of dependence and independence. I love your style and you are braver than me

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