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Old 09-18-2012, 10:15 AM   #256
Feyala OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by breakouttathemould View Post
I think that's the key ...

Love your attitude. Love the RR.

More please!

Your wish is my command! Haha.

Thank you!
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Old 09-19-2012, 01:34 PM   #257
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Hells Canyon looked like fun! I was riding toward the lucid dreaming conference at that time, otherwise I would have gone there. Now I kind of wished I had.
Well, if I don't make it to Alaska next year, then I will.
Great job on riding the dirt! I still feel Spirit controls me too, but I am slowly starting to let her and trust her.
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Old 09-19-2012, 01:34 PM   #258
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:21 PM   #259
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Hells Canyon - Hat Point (June 16th)

Prior to the gathering, I'd been talking with a gentleman who volunteered to meet up to help me check and adjust my valve clearances at the rally, as I didn't have the required tools. After managing to wake up, I met up with "Smiling Jack"/Dave and we got down to work.


This was the first time I'd done anything like this. DR650 owners will laugh, because adjusting the valves is dead simple on these bikes, just some feeler gauges and patience, but believe me when I say that this was A Big Deal to me, and that I'm grateful Dave was able to let me do the work myself and step back. Because he did things this way, I was able to gain confidence that I knew the procedure, and I feel like I can do it completely by myself now, which is awesome and empowering.

A bit of a confession: I am routinely afraid, sometimes paralyzingly so, of "fucking things up", especially when it comes to the bike. I realize that a lot of this is due to unfamiliarity, I don't really have much experience with the mechanics of it. Some of it is definitely due to fear that I won't be able to fix it and I'll have to pay somebody else money I don't have to do so, or be stuck somewhere, etc. I'd like to be able to tear my bike down and put it back together from memory, but I just don't have the experience yet. I'm trying to learn. I'm slowly getting there. So if I appear enthused by some terribly mundane procedure, well, that's why. Like most women, I didn't have a whole lot of experience with learning how to take things apart and fix them growing up. I frequently find that guys will want to fix stuff for me, instead of teaching me how. I don't like feeling reliant on others for any reason, especially because I am so frequently alone.

While adjusting the valves, my speaker wire exhaust mount was noticed and commented on. It worked better than nothing, for sure, but Dave suggested that we make an exhaust bracket that would do a better job, especially with all of the off-road riding I'd been doing. After a few trips to the local auto parts store, we rigged together a fantastic bracket out of a large hose clamp and a swinging muffler mount (which will appear in a later photo).

I took the opportunity to clean my chain, which looked like it had started to grow fur with all of the dirt caked to it. Gear oil makes a pretty fantastic chain grease - better than the waxes I've tried, but it sure does me no favors with dirt.

Adjusted and secure, I headed out for a lazy ride with Dave and "TheFluffy" up to Hat Point. I was cautioned to make sure that I just stayed in first and kept off the brakes on the way back down - it was a fairly steep, but predictable grade. I went for the views and I was NOT disappointed!


At a couple of points I actually started to get a bit more confident. In some spots I stood up, sometimes I was going 30-40mph. I always sat back down and slowed way down for the curves though. More work to do I suppose... I understand the ideas behind steering offroad in low traction, but that's another one of those things where my brain says to do one thing and my body does something else entirely!

We stopped often to admire the landscape. It was gorgeous.




We got to the top and climbed the fire tower, which was pretty awesome. I remembered that they still hire folks for fire watch duty and thought about what it would be like to live up there for months. I offered the others some trail mix and we listened to the wood creak as the tower swayed slightly in the wind.




This area did not escape the motorcyclists unscathed. "What does that say? AOL? Oh. ADV!"


Our bikes looked so small from up there. The lifeless trees in the distance provided a grim reminder of the purpose of the tower...


On the way back down, I actually did well! I didn't ride the brakes, and I felt in control. I probably could have gone faster, but I didn't want to push it too much, I was enjoying the more laid back ride.


At one of the breaks we took, I found that an entire swarm of butterflies had descended on the remnants of a campfire, and busied myself with a game where I tried to see how many of them I could get on my hand at the same time. I think my record was 7 or 8? I love certain bugs, I find them fascinating.




We arrived back into camp just in time for dinner! Catering from a local restaurant, Leo's, had been arranged. Brian and Margaret had been gracious enough to inform him that I was vegetarian, so he made a vegetable linguini just for me, while everybody else had pork sandwiches and beans. I was grateful that they went to such effort for my sake! I think this is also the night that we took the group photo:


My memory is failing, but I think that this was the night that Sasquatch did a super informative talk about suspensions, explaining how to check if it's set up appropriately, and what to do if it's not. I admit that I had no idea what the hell sag or deflection were prior to this, and it made me consider that my aftermarket springs might be a bit stiff for me. Better too stiff than too soft, for sure, but maybe all of my bouncing around WASN'T normal. Hmmm... I guess we'll see how it rides when it's loaded down with all my stuff!

At the fire late that night, after most of the normal folks had gone to sleep, Jettn' Jim and Parepin/Alex showed up. Mark suggested I would get along well with these two and indeed, we had some great chats. Jim had a lot of awesome thoughts about energy, the universe, etc, and we found a lot of common ground. Alex was a nomad like I was, eschewing building "an empire", as he called it, in favor of chasing dreams.


Eventually I stumbled into bed in the wee hours of the morning.

Thanks to Dave for helping with the valves, leading the Hat Point ride, and taking photos of me along the way! Thanks to John for some of these photos too!
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:24 PM   #260
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadGal View Post
Hells Canyon looked like fun! I was riding toward the lucid dreaming conference at that time, otherwise I would have gone there. Now I kind of wished I had.
Well, if I don't make it to Alaska next year, then I will.
Great job on riding the dirt! I still feel Spirit controls me too, but I am slowly starting to let her and trust her.
Thanks! I highly recommend this rally if you are in the northwest next June, the people and views are phenomenal. It's an old saying that photos don't do it justice, but when you're actually out there and can see for what feels like a hundred miles, it's really breathtaking. There isn't much drunken tomfoolery, everyone was super nice and helpful, etc.

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I'm in
Awesome, glad to have you along!
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Old 09-19-2012, 07:43 PM   #261
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Hells Canyon - Camp Creek and Zumwalt (June 17th)

Before I could stumble blindly out of my tent mid-morning, a good number of folks had already packed up and headed home. What were they thinking?! They missed a FANTASTIC breakfast! Brian and Margaret spent the entire morning cooking little breakfast sandwiches for everyone. Margaret was kind enough to make me one without any ham. There was also orange juice, cinnamon rolls with homemade icing, and apples. Somehow I didn't take a photo of this glorious feast. Too busy eating I guess.

As the morning wore on, almost everybody filtered away. Work on Monday, or other engagements to attend to. An endless stream of goodbyes as people rolled out, on two wheels or towing. It was a bit bittersweet, I felt like I'd made a bunch of friends and now I wasn't going to see them again for a long time, if ever, but I am used to letting people go, and hey, I can always come back again next year!

My first ADV rally was an unqualified success. Everybody was awesome. I literally felt like the past few days were some kind of Rocky training montage, my riding skills easily doubled. If anybody's interested in seeing more photos, there are plenty on the main thread as well as this other one.

The wind really began to pick up, and I helped a few of the others take down a canvas awning over the breakfast area that was acting like a sail. Later, I'd read that several people were having a difficult time making it home due to the high winds, and that Fluffy had gone into a tank slapper and ended up in a ditch! Luckily he was okay...

I had no plans, and as it turns out, neither did Jim and Al. Fantastic! We hung around, got to know each other, and chatted about life, the universe, and everything. We ended up going over to look at my bike, which was parked by the port-a-john, and well. Sherri took this photo of us:


At Brian's insistence, we grabbed a bunch of apples and stored them away in our packs for later.

Jim was a real character. Friendly and generous, he talked a mile a minute, and it was, at times, a bit overwhelming. I fought the urge to get irritated when I was interrupted and instead focused on relaxing and listening instead. Probably good for me! Jim was riding around with this dog which belonged to a friend of his:


Apparently the dog had learned how to hang on to the seat behind his friend's ATV, and when Jim went to go, the dog just hopped up behind him. With his friend's permission, he decided to see how the dog would do riding, and apparently he did just fine! That dog was awesome. He just sat there patiently outside on the bike while we ate at a Mexican restaurant for lunch/dinner.

Alex spent some time lounging in his hammock, hanging out with the dog:


He mentioned he wanted to try to find some of his tools which fell out on Camp Creek Road, and I decided to join him.


For the most part, this road was pretty placid! When it wasn't, at least it didn't have thousand-foot drops, so I was less concerned with failure. It was just a nice little road snaking along a river, a couple of dry washes to cross with large rocks, but very easy compared to what I'd done recently, as long as I kept on the throttle. I had fun. At one point, the road was nothing but foot-deep dips. The bike was incredibly unstable with me seated, so I almost reflexively stood up. I was amazed by the difference this made, and kept standing for large stretches, even when I felt that I should probably sit down. At one point, I saw a cattle guard that was a good six inches higher than the rest of the road, so I gunned it, not wanting the front wheel to twist and cause a tumble. Al, who'd been watching from the side, later mentioned that he was surprised when I caught some air. I just grinned.

The road moved out of the hills and onto a rolling plain. I admit a bit of trepedation as the signage on the road indicated that this was a route used for a “hare scramble”, which I had no idea what it was. Devoid of large rocks, my largest enemy was loose dirt and some mud, and I found myself alternating sitting and standing, depending on what I felt would be best for the terrain. At one point we consulted my offline maps and picked a route most likely to get us back to camp. We ended up on Zumwalt road, which is basically a gravel highway.


This thing was awesome.

I think I made it up to 70 on this road. I don't know why, maybe it was because it was straight and well-travelled, but I could hardly tell that I was on gravel.

I did stop to take a photo of this dilapidated old barn though:


Eventually we made it out to the roadway and I guided us back to camp.


I think this was the evening we stopped at a grocery store and bought some drinks, I had some Mike's Hard Lemonade and Al had some wine. We stayed up bullshitting, watching the stars, and at one point I grabbed my glow poi and started spinning them around. Jim came out of his tent and we all agreed that spinning glowing things look fucking cool, even though I'm not as skilled with them as I'd like to be. I tried to show them some basic moves, and there was some swearing as the poi smacked into various body parts, but we had a lot of fun.

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Old 09-19-2012, 07:54 PM   #262
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Thumb Mick the Wonderdog.....

Glowing dildo's on a rope I tell ya...

The SuperPooch's name is Mick... Dug Bar to Imnaha store in 1hr 15min, what a dog!

Soooo now ya kow what it feels like to be interupted eh? Sorry again about that.
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:55 PM   #263
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Hells Canyon - Hanging Out at Log House (June 18-20th)

The next three days I spent hanging around camp, because my tires were absolutely shot, and the days sort of blended together. On one day (probably the 18th), Jim and Al went down Dug Bar. I spent most of the day inside the office, with Brian's blessing. I tried not to feel shut in and trapped, I really wanted to ride, but those tires weren't safe!


At one point I met Motomedic/Feike. He was pretty cool! We didn't get much of a chance to talk though, he seemed to have other engagements to attend to.

trio

Jim volunteered to find me some tire replacements for free (!!), which bowled me over with generosity, but he was going to Lewiston so he'd be a couple days. I never would have expected that, thanks so much Jim! Al stayed behind and we hung out. The weather was kind of hit and miss, one day it was rainy/hailing and we spent most of the time hiding in the office.

At one point I started talking with Margaret, who is in charge of the camp's website. She mentioned that she didn't like some things, and I offered to help. As it turns out, the website was created with an application made by the company I worked for back in Phoenix, so I was more than qualified to help out. We spent several hours fixing the shoddy HTML and inconsistent font sizes and colors, with her directing me on what changes to make. They seemed very grateful for the help and took me out to dinner. "When's the last time you slept in a real bed?" I thought back to the woods camping I'd been doing before the rally. "Ummmm.." "You're sleeping in the luxury suite tonight." And with that, my fate was sealed. Pillowtop mattress, soft fluffy comforter, electric blanket, heater. It was like sleeping in a cloud. Al crashed on the office couch.

Brian and Margaret were awesome, I know that I've said this before, but these people treated us like family. They let us use their shop. They let me stay for free a couple nights, and only charged us the rally rate ($11) otherwise. At one point they invited Al and I upstairs to eat lunch with them in their kitchen. I helped Brian assemble a new picnic table they'd purchased. It was good to relax and not have anywhere to be.

On the 20th, I woke up early and was excited to get my new tires mounted. Jim had gotten back with the new treads the previous evening. After some fighting, I managed to figure out how to operate the ATV lift and started changing the tires at a leisurely pace. You can also see the exhaust mount we made a few days prior in this pic:

bikejack

I managed to get the bead broken on at least one of them before Jim woke up and started helping (by which I mean he mostly took over), and he got the tires changed over in no time at all!

Front:Rear:


Yay! It's amazing how harsh a thousand miles can be on a set of tires...

While he was in there, he commented on the front wheel bearings and the rear brakes, telling me to keep an eye on them and change them at some point in the next few thousand miles. Roger.

Al needed to replace some brake pads, I think:


We ate brunch at the Cheyenne Cafe in Joseph.


Holy shit portion sizes! One of the chefs (possibly the owner?) seemed to find it greatly amusing when people came in and ordered a bunch of food without knowing what they were up against. He laughed as he described children ordering short stacks – when a single pancake is almost bigger than the plate and a half inch thick. I don't usually take photos of food, but here:


Jim had to get back to Lewiston, and I decided to ride with Al west to Portland. We picked up a motorcycle map and packed up. I'd like to say we left early, but that would be a terrible lie, maybe around 3 pm? We said goodbye and gave hugs to Jim and Brian.

Goodbye Log Cabin! Bye Jim! It was really nice to meet you, I feel like we were on the same wavelength a lot of the time. Lots of really great in-depth philosophical discussion, exactly the kind I like best! But as the song goes, "We'll Meet Again".


I let Al pick the route. We took a bunch of back roads, which were pretty awesome. Lots of abandoned buildings, mostly barns, littered along the way. At one point he tried to take a photo of me while riding, inhabiting the oncoming lane and pulling alongside me and I kinda freaked out a bit. Even though there was no oncoming traffic for at least a mile or two, I really... was not used to that sort of thing.

We rode through a forest and dipped down into this little town, where we stopped at the tavern for refreshments (the only building that was open at 6 pm). Al asked the locals about places they'd suggest we stay. We ended up cruising into a nearby national forest, riding a bumpy dirt road after dark, and finding what appeared to be some kind of unoccupied hunting camp. Poles slung between the trees, sizeable fire ring.

We made camp and crashed for the evening.
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:59 PM   #264
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Glowing dildo's on a rope I tell ya...

The SuperPooch's name is Mick... Dug Bar to Imnaha store in 1hr 15min, what a dog!

Soooo now ya kow what it feels like to be interupted eh? Sorry again about that.
Yeah Mick was awesome. Best motorcycling dog I've ever seen.

Didn't you get the memo that I'm the only one who's allowed to interrupt other people?! Sheesh! Once I got used to it, you were fine though. It's just intense getting to know you, you impart a lot of information in a small period of time.

It was good to meet you man, I feel like I gained a friend. Our paths will cross in the future though, I'm sure of it.
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Old 09-20-2012, 01:31 PM   #265
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Life is dangerous. Not doing what you love makes life even more dangerous...
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Old 09-20-2012, 03:19 PM   #266
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Hells Canyon to Portland (June 21st and 22nd)

We were rudely awakened by mooing.

Sometime in the early morning, somebody had come by with a truck and let loose a herd of cattle to graze in the woods. There was one cow in particular with a low, almost demonic sounding call, and we had a good laugh about it. As I cooked up some pasta, Al tried to befriend a calf that had gotten separated from the others, but the creature was having none of it. The pasta turned out gummy and depressing, because the sterno I use to cook with doesn't ever produce a true boil. I decided to find a different stove solution once I got back.

We took our time packing up, and headed out over some nice dirt and gravel roads. I felt like I was rollerskating on marbles, so I had to stop to lower my tire pressure, which helped quite a bit. I had a blast. Al went on ahead, and I was left to my own devices, dodging the occasional lumber truck. Of course, this meant I took a bunch of photos:




At one point, I noticed a few cows grazing in the torn-up forest. This aspect of national forests always confused me.


The dirt road dipped down sharply into the more arid valley below, with some really nice views:




I hit pavement again and caught up with Al at a nearby gas station. I somehow forgot that I'd aired down my tires for the gravel, and by the time I remembered, some 20 miles down the road, Al was already so far ahead that I couldn't exactly flag him down. I didn't want to speed too much, fearing that more heat and low tire pressure would be bad news. I do have a small Slime air compressor, but it requires that I get to the battery in order to use it, meaning I have to take off the fairings and seat. It's not very convenient.

I rode gingerly and hoped for the best. After blowing through a small town and seeing no sign of him, I was starting to get frustrated, but then there he was waiting in a roadside pull-out. We aired up my tires with his bicycle pump and lingered at the stop a bit longer, enjoying the landscape.


Al had become king of the mulch pile:




With newfound confidence now that my tires weren't going to go out, I kept up with Al, rocking out to some Blind Guardian as I sped along the twisty canyon road. At one point, we realized that we hadn't seen a grocery store in some time, and didn't know what we were going to do for dinner. We stopped at a small market, but all they had were chips and soda. They sold us some dry macaroni from the back, and called another place called RJs in nearby Fossil which would give us some dry cheese sauce mix. We rehydrated ourselves there and contemplated the route.


There were some concerns about finding an open gas station. Most of the small towns in eastern Oregon seem to close up shop around 6 or 7, and it's illegal to pump your own gas, so no 24 hour self-serve. Originally we were going to aim for the woods, but with the weather turning sour, the decision was made to keep to the main roads, where we knew there would be fuel. We pressed on once it grew dark, and ended up riding through the rain and lightning, at night. My bike was coughing and sputtering, and with Al a ways ahead, I was concerned about whether I was going to make it more than once. At one point we dropped down into a valley that was covered in hundreds of red lights pulsating in unison, probably an airfield, but it was surreal and beautiful in the darkness.

Eventually we arrived in The Dalles after midnight, exhausted and not wanting to ride any more. We checked several cheap motels, only to find that they were nothing even resembling cheap. Rather than trying to find a place to stealth camp in the woods, we decided to try a nearby state park which I found online instead. Eventually we figured out where we were supposed to camp, in the dark, and I paid the fee (at least it was cheap at $9!), helping out a couple of folks in a car figure out the system at the same time. They were grateful, and promised us a fantastic breakfast.


The next morning, they gave us a plate of snack foods. Little bagel pieces with cream cheese, pineapple slices, hard boiled eggs, bits of chicken for Al, etc. A real treat to not have to worry about food! We got to talking with them, and they were a mother and daughter on a little road trip. They insisted on taking a photo of us:


I asked the daughter if she wanted to sit on my motorcycle, and her eyes lit up. "Really?!" "Yes." "I'm not going to knock it over, am I? I don't want to break it..." "No, you're fine. These bikes have been through way worse." She loved it, and eventually we managed to cajole her mother into sitting on Al's bike too. Priceless. Everybody was grinning.


I snapped a quick pic of the area near the tent. Awesome!


We showered and packed.


Heading out, we cruised along the 84, and stopped at a scenic overlook. The fog gave it a nice otherworldly atmosphere.


We also went to a rest area which had a Native American guy selling salmon he'd caught recently. Al bought a couple of fillets. My feelings on fishing are mixed, but at least these were sustainably wild-caught, not farmed, and the money went directly to a vulnerable community instead of lining a corporation's pockets.


I told Al that as soon as we got over the mountains it'd probably start raining and Portland traffic would be terrible, and I was right on both counts. We managed to hit Portland during rush hour. While going through Portland on the I-5, I almost got creamed by an asshole in an SUV who merged into my lane without looking where he was going. I had to slam on the brakes and ride the lefthand shoulder to get behind him. Lovely.

We continued up to Battleground, WA and hung out in a coffee shop to get out of the rain. I chatted a bit with Oz online while I was there. Apparently he had been missing me, because he insisted that I come back to his place regardless of what the roommates said. Al and I parted ways, he went off to meet up with other folks he knew in Portland, and I headed down the freeway toward Oz's place.

I was extremely uncomfortable overstaying my welcome like this. I more or less rely upon my good standing with others in order to get a lot of my goals accomplished, and burning up that good will by staying longer than I should does not sit right with me. I tend to live by these words, from The Beach:

"So never refuse an invitation. Never resist the unfamiliar. Never fail to be polite, and never outstay your welcome. Just keep your mind open and suck in the experience. And if it hurts, you know what? It's probably worth it."

However. I did need to sell things before I could really take off, my Rebel, for one, and a pile of other various odds and ends. I couldn't sell these things easily if I wasn't living where they were located, so I settled in for a sort of awkward standoff with the roommates. After a couple of days we made an arrangement and I was allowed to continue staying there, albeit a bit more awkwardly than before. For the next month or so I would mostly just try to stay out of the way whenever I was at "home".
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Old 09-20-2012, 04:24 PM   #267
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Great trip report!

I can't believe that dog just sat on the seat without any protection? That would scare me to bits!
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Old 09-20-2012, 08:47 PM   #268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Feyala View Post
Yeah Mick was awesome. Best motorcycling dog I've ever seen.

Didn't you get the memo that I'm the only one who's allowed to interrupt other people?! Sheesh! Once I got used to it, you were fine though. It's just intense getting to know you, you impart a lot of information in a small period of time.

It was good to meet you man, I feel like I gained a friend. Our paths will cross in the future though, I'm sure of it.
Yes ma'am that he is... Best dog I've ever had the pleasure of working/playing with.
And yup yup pretty efficient at most things huh... including information impartation.
It was gooood to meet you too Sista, definately be wandering into one another again wuunatheeeesdaays.

Peace and Love,
JJ
ps... Gotta add... that daughter looks miiighty Puuurtty sittn' on your Red steed I tell ya!^)- aaaan DANG I forgot about the roommate sitch you had goin' on:/


Quote:
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Great trip report!

I can't believe that dog just sat on the seat without any protection? That would scare me to bits!
Ol' Mick has been riding on the back of my Buddy Waynes 4wheeler since his first year... he was about 2yrs 4months when we did Doug bar in July.
So since he'd jumped up before, we figured if he did it again I'd ride around the block and see how it flew.... he did goooood so off to the Rally we went. Ask Parepin/Alex how how fast Desiree' goes with Mick riding shotgun!

On a more technical note, the set up gives Mick an Alaska leather Sheepskin for traction on the bottom, my top case with a blanket on it sometimes for rear traction and padding/comfort, sleeping bag/pad and tent duffels on either side for recliner like side arms giving him leverage to wedge in and traction to hold on.
When we went to breakfast at the SUPER portions diner I had the tent setup and bag and pad in it..... soooo the seat had no side arms... Windy as hell and Mick wasn't liking it at all. So we went back to the Log Cabin while Feyela and Parepin rode. Just not safe and secure.... but with the sides on, watch out cuz there isn't much gonna slow us down.

Jettn Jim screwed with this post 09-20-2012 at 09:14 PM
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Old 09-20-2012, 10:34 PM   #269
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I have really enjoyed this RR, The camaraderie at the HC rally you describe can be felt. You have good writing skills.

I loved the story about the Mexican fisherman who knew where he was and what his life was all about.

That brings me to the point of this post. I believe that you may be interested in journalism. It fits your lifestyle. You could be a freelance writer. An example would be to write an article about the HC rally and submit it to a motorcycle magazine. You have the skills for this and it would be an easy way to extend your freestyle nomadic lifestyle. They accept it and send you a check. I'm pretty sure they would be interested in your point of view. It also allows you to go to all of the interesting places and additionally, you can write off your expenses, other than food, because you would be constantly doing research for your next article which is the same as what you're doing for this RR.

It's just a suggestion. I'm not suggesting that you build an empire. Just make enough to stay up late, shoot some pool, sleep in, and have a nice dinner now and then.

Kabluie.
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Old 09-21-2012, 09:35 AM   #270
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Great trip report!

I can't believe that dog just sat on the seat without any protection? That would scare me to bits!
Glad you are enjoying it! Mick stayed pretty stable, as Jim mentioned, but as somebody who's uncomfortable with having even a human passenger, I have to admit it would unnerve me too! At least the dog knows what he's doing! :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jettn Jim View Post
Yes ma'am that he is... Best dog I've ever had the pleasure of working/playing with.
And yup yup pretty efficient at most things huh... including information impartation.
It was gooood to meet you too Sista, definately be wandering into one another again wuunatheeeesdaays.

Peace and Love,
JJ
ps... Gotta add... that daughter looks miiighty Puuurtty sittn' on your Red steed I tell ya!^)- aaaan DANG I forgot about the roommate sitch you had goin' on:/
If you're staying out west, it'll probably be next year, I'm heading south for the winter soon. XD It's already starting to rain...

Luckily the roommate situation resolved itself a few months ago, so it's a bit more... peaceful here, haha. I'm still uncomfortable with overstaying my welcome though. :/ Luckily I'll be getting out of dodge soon...

Quote:
Originally Posted by kabluie View Post
I have really enjoyed this RR, The camaraderie at the HC rally you describe can be felt. You have good writing skills.

I loved the story about the Mexican fisherman who knew where he was and what his life was all about.

That brings me to the point of this post. I believe that you may be interested in journalism. It fits your lifestyle. You could be a freelance writer. An example would be to write an article about the HC rally and submit it to a motorcycle magazine. You have the skills for this and it would be an easy way to extend your freestyle nomadic lifestyle. They accept it and send you a check. I'm pretty sure they would be interested in your point of view. It also allows you to go to all of the interesting places and additionally, you can write off your expenses, other than food, because you would be constantly doing research for your next article which is the same as what you're doing for this RR.

It's just a suggestion. I'm not suggesting that you build an empire. Just make enough to stay up late, shoot some pool, sleep in, and have a nice dinner now and then.

Kabluie.
Thank you so much for taking the time to comment! This made my day.

I don't have a problem with work itself, as long as I decide when I work. If I have control, then I can take off for a year and do other stuff and come back to it later, the work fits around my life, instead of the other way around. From what I've read of freelancing, this seems to be the case.

I have often thought about trying to turn my ramblings into a source of income, making the trip self-funding, but my problem is mostly that I've never thought of myself as a writer, and I have no idea where to begin. I view a lot of my writing as rather unpolished, as much as I edit out the verbal tics and other nonsense, it's not nearly at the level of journalists I admire. I have a good vocabulary, but that by itself doesn't make a decent journalist. I also read a lot of articles where journalists these days are fighting for scraps, people far more talented than I, due to the shrinking of the print market.

I think I might be able to eventually get to a point where I think my writing is salable, don't get me wrong. I don't think it's total crap (or I wouldn't post it), just unpolished. I don't really know how to polish it though. I don't know where to find out the limitations of current print media, how long to make pieces, what people tend to be looking for in a piece, how to shop articles around to different people that might want them. I imagine if I took a journalism class I could probably learn about these things, but I am usually not in one place long enough to do so. Do you have any suggestions?
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