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Old 04-09-2013, 08:04 AM   #976
DOGSROOT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rider View Post
I've come to the rather inescapable conclusion that sport touring motorcycles are among the rarest forms of transportation on Earth.
No matter where I go - unless it's to a bike rally - they are invisible. Nowhere to be found. On a motorcycle trip recently on my FRJ1300 covering about 1,400 miles I spotted ...
  • Probably 3 BMW R1200RTs
  • 1 BMW K1200S
  • 1 BMW R1100RT
  • 1 BMW R1150RT
  • 1 Triumph Sprint
  • 2 Honda ST1300s
  • 1 Honda ST1100
  • 1 Kawasaki Concours14
  • A couple of "I can't quite make that one out"s
In all those miles. In great motorcycle country.
The rest were old beat standards, dirt bikes, Gold Wings and, of course, Harleys.
Thousands and thousands and thousands of Harleys.

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

But it really brought home to me once again, after riding for so many years, that the sport tourer is an odd bird that defies convention and appears not to appeal to very many people, which I find puzzling. To me, they're bikes that do so many things well (as long as it's on pavement).
What's your theory as to why sport tourers don't sell very well?
No confusion in Rider's mind...
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Old 04-09-2013, 09:15 AM   #977
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Originally Posted by DOGSROOT View Post

No confusion in Rider's mind...
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What's your problem?
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Old 04-09-2013, 09:27 AM   #978
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What's your problem?

No problem.

No sarcasm intended!

No confusion.


I was just supporting Qaz's statement, and trying to refocus the thread a little.


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Old 04-09-2013, 11:38 AM   #979
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rider View Post
...after riding for so many years, that the sport tourer is an odd bird that defies convention and appears not to appeal to very many people, which I find puzzling. To me, they're bikes that do so many things well (as long as it's on pavement).
What's your theory as to why sport tourers don't sell very well?
My theory (for USA, of course):

Most motorcycle owners ride about 3000 miles per year. Sport-Touring riders will do that in one trip. Most motorcycle owners do not want a bike designed to do something they do not intend to use thier motorcycle for...

Most motorcycle owners bought a motorcycle as a lifestyle accessory. Its look, its image has to fit that preconceived idea. Sport Touring motorcycles are well down the list from choppers, cruisers, crotch rockets, and dirt bikes...

Most Harley owners do not put a lot of miles on their bikes, but because the MoCo sells half of the large displacement street bikes on the roads in the USA, it's only natural that Harleys will be well represented out on the highways.

Most sport touring riders pick backroads and secondary routes for their trips. They travel solo, or in small groups. That makes the sport touring rider much less likely to be seen by another traveler, especially if that traveler is on a primary route.
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:05 PM   #980
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocker59 View Post
My theory (for USA, of course):

Most motorcycle owners ride about 3000 miles per year. Sport-Touring riders will do that in one trip. Most motorcycle owners do not want a bike designed to do something they do not intend to use thier motorcycle for...

Most motorcycle owners bought a motorcycle as a lifestyle accessory. Its look, its image has to fit that preconceived idea. Sport Touring motorcycles are well down the list from choppers, cruisers, crotch rockets, and dirt bikes...

Most Harley owners do not put a lot of miles on their bikes, but because the MoCo sells half of the large displacement street bikes on the roads in the USA, it's only natural that Harleys will be well represented out on the highways.

Most sport touring riders pick backroads and secondary routes for their trips. They travel solo, or in small groups. That makes the sport touring rider much less likely to be seen by another traveler, especially if that traveler is on a primary route.
Those are good points. Hadn't thought about it quite like that, but you're exactly right.
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:32 PM   #981
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I agree with Rocker 100%. When I see the mileage on some bikes I can't help thinking that they are not getting their money out of it.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:52 PM   #982
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Originally Posted by Twinz View Post
I think one area that manufacturers need to pay more attention to is fuel mileage. My "modern" ST bike, my Futura, is lucky to get 40+ mpg. My old R1100RS did better than that and the Futura is a lighter bike...but with more horsepower! I don't see any reason that a modern ST bike cannot get 50+ mpg. I mean cars do it, and they weigh a lot more than a 500/600 lb bike! I mean, gas is expensive! Manufacturers have long been able to disregard fuel mileage because gas was cheap and riders basically didn't care. That situation has changed. I'm about to leave on a two week trip south that I've been taking for 20 years now. A fill-up that used to cost less than $10 now costs twice as much or more. Manufacturers need to act on this!

What do you think?
I agree, but the Futura is a bad example, as it's a notorious gas hog. Have you tried the FPR mod? Changing the regulator pressure from airbox to intake manifold seems to be the going thing for better MPGs.

Also S-T bikes like the Concours are beginning to come with eco / highway fuel maps to save gas.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:14 PM   #983
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Sport-Touring is just a relative question of packing.



Four days, 2100 miles. An S1k, Gixxer 1k, Monster 1100EVO. We had an R12S with us but he burned his rear tire up early and had to bail early in search of replacement.

Personally, I'd take Monster to Prudhoe Bay. Just gotta figure out that slight tank range issue...

Still, here's my all-time favorite Sport Tourer.



1995 Dakar Yellow BMW R1100RSL.

I still miss that bike.
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Old 04-10-2013, 04:44 AM   #984
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Originally Posted by Thumperama View Post
2001 Triumph Sprint ST. I've gotten 50 mpg several times. Usually I am in the mid 40 mpg range. That sweet triple is music to my ears.
those are great bikes. I had one for a couple of months, loved the motor, but I couldn't go past 100 miles on it without being sore all over and having to stop and stretch.
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Old 04-10-2013, 05:27 AM   #985
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Originally Posted by BMW-K View Post
Sport-Touring is just a relative question of packing.

Still, here's my all-time favorite Sport Tourer.
1995 Dakar Yellow BMW R1100RSL.
I still miss that bike.
Seems to the the choice of alot of us........
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Old 04-10-2013, 05:40 AM   #986
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dankarnov View Post
I agree, but the Futura is a bad example, as it's a notorious gas hog. Have you tried the FPR mod? Changing the regulator pressure from airbox to intake manifold seems to be the going thing for better MPGs.

Also S-T bikes like the Concours are beginning to come with eco / highway fuel maps to save gas.
Wow, are you ever up to date on the forum chatter! My Futura mileage seems to be better than most, and I'm waiting for more feedback before I change the FPR (fuel pressure regulator) vacuum arrangement. I find it hard to believe that if gains were so simply achieved this way that aprilia wouldn't have done it themselves!
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Old 04-10-2013, 05:55 AM   #987
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I have to agree with Rocker59's points as he describes my riding style rather well (my friends' have similar habits too). Of course, my distance per year is low lately due to "life" but that is temporary...when I do go out for a ride it is generally longer than the urban tavern-to-tavern that many riders perform. I point my bike straight to the nearest backroad and escape traffic/crowds et cetera.
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Old 04-10-2013, 06:00 AM   #988
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Quote:
2001 Triumph Sprint ST. I've gotten 50 mpg several times
Quote:
but the Futura is a bad example, as it's a notorious gas hog
I consistently get over 50mpg on my Sprint ST and live / ride at over 9,000ft elevation.
On the other hand, my Aprilia Falco ( Rotax) has never seen 40mpg... but who cares !

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW-K
Sport-Touring is just a relative question of packing.
In that case, here's two of my sport tourers



Though the ZX14R doesn't pack as small !
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Yostwerks screwed with this post 04-10-2013 at 06:17 AM
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Old 04-10-2013, 06:24 AM   #989
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This (on the left) is how I've been doing it. Works for me.

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Old 04-10-2013, 08:40 AM   #990
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Question



According to my onboard "computer" I'm averaging 44.3 mpg; considering the bike is this considered good mileage?
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