ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-10-2012, 03:33 AM   #721
DockingPilot
Hooked Up and Hard Over
 
DockingPilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: Andover, N.J.
Oddometer: 9,027
Also if your just changing the tires and not the tubes dont take them out. After you have the top bead off simply stuff the deflated tube under the brake disc and remove the bottom bead of the tire. Take your new tire and place it over the tube where the stem is still in place. Spoon on the the rest of the bottom bead. Add some air now to tube and place it back in and finish tire install. No need to remove tube and deal with the stem. Saves time and fingers. Lol

Sent from my SCH-I800 using Tapatalk 2
__________________
Frank Reinbold

"Every bike I ever had, was the best bike I ever had, when I had it"
DockingPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2012, 06:33 AM   #722
russt
Adventurer
 
russt's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Quartz Hill, CA
Oddometer: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
I just came in from the garage where I put a new tire on the rear wheel.
I used the "Zip-Tie" method and it worked great.


I inflated the tube inside the tire enough to expand the tube into the tire.
Then I strapped the zippies around the tire and cinched them tight, pulling the beads together as one.
The valve stem was held tight by the beads and I just fed the valve through the rim hole and pushed the tire all the way into the rim well at the valve.
I then screwed the nut on the stem some so it wouldn't pop out and then I put a zippy around the tire and the rim to hold the tire in the well.

Then I was able to push both beads over the rim for more than half the tire and used one tire iron to pop the rest in a few inches at a time. I had done the front tire last night the same way (first time ever using zippies) and I did that one dry, with no lube and it was easy. For the rear I used dish soap to compare and it was just as easy even though the rear tire is much stiffer and wider. FWIW I timed how long it took at my usual turtle pace and it was 5 minutes from tire zipped and sitting next to the rim, to tire completely on the rim and ready to remove the zippies.

I do also have a valve stem puller that threads into the valve (replacing the core) and I have always used it to fish the valve stem through before but with the zippies I didn't need it.

As you have found, trying to get the valve stem through the rim with one bead on the rim is an exercise in character.
That means if you don't turn green and get hulking mad and throw stuff around, you have a good character.
I don't. My hands are too big and the bead is so stiff!

So, a long worded response to your simple question but I recommend pulling the tire off the rim and try the zippie way.

Otherwise, the way I used to struggle and fight to get the valve in required Hulkifying angry strength.
And that always resulted in lots of skin torn off the backs of my hands and fingers.

The valve stem tool helps to fish but you still have to fight to get the valve at 90 degrees to the rim hole to feed it through.

Anyone else have a good secret?

I am going to use Zip-Ties from now on. I used a small screwdriver to lift the lock tab to release the zippies for reuse.
I picked up a bag of 15 (?) at Lowe's and now I keep them in my tool box with my tire tools.

Hope this helps
Thanks, I have seen this method used, but was not taking the tire completly off. I toughened up last night and pulled the sidewall away while I jammed my hand up there and fished around to get the stem in the hole.
russt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2012, 06:42 AM   #723
russt
Adventurer
 
russt's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Quartz Hill, CA
Oddometer: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrprez View Post
Take one of your tire tools and open the bead up on the opposite side of the tire next to the stem. This will give you more room to get your hand in there and move the tube into place. Also helps to have the tube partially inflated. By adding some air to the tube helps to prevent pinch flats. Another tip is to use baby powder on the tube. This allows the tube to slide easier against the tire making it easier to get the tube lined up so the stem is straight. Also helps to prevent friction between the tire and the tube.
Thanks for the suggestions. I was thinking I was going to wake up to 20 inmates telling me to
  1. Remove wheel from bike
  2. Put wheel in back of truck
  3. Drive to the ATM/ Bank
  4. Withdraw $20
  5. Drop off wheel and $20 at motorcycle shop
Next time I will try opening up the bead on the other side, thanks. I powdered up the tube and got it in just fine, then decided to stop being weak and jammed my hand up there to fish the valve stem in place. Once the valve was in the hole, used Windex on the bead and the tire went just fine.

Airing up the tube helps it to not pinch and twist on the bead as well. Just like a bicycle.
russt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2012, 09:21 AM   #724
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
I just came in from the garage where I put a new tire on the rear wheel.
I used the "Zip-Tie" method and it worked great.


I inflated the tube inside the tire enough to expand the tube into the tire.
Then I strapped the zippies around the tire and cinched them tight, pulling the beads together as one.
The valve stem was held tight by the beads and I just fed the valve through the rim hole and pushed the tire all the way into the rim well at the valve.
I then screwed the nut on the stem some so it wouldn't pop out and then I put a zippy around the tire and the rim to hold the tire in the well.

Then I was able to push both beads over the rim for more than half the tire and used one tire iron to pop the rest in a few inches at a time. I had done the front tire last night the same way (first time ever using zippies) and I did that one dry, with no lube and it was easy. For the rear I used dish soap to compare and it was just as easy even though the rear tire is much stiffer and wider. FWIW I timed how long it took at my usual turtle pace and it was 5 minutes from tire zipped and sitting next to the rim, to tire completely on the rim and ready to remove the zippies.

I do also have a valve stem puller that threads into the valve (replacing the core) and I have always used it to fish the valve stem through before but with the zippies I didn't need it.

As you have found, trying to get the valve stem through the rim with one bead on the rim is an exercise in character.
That means if you don't turn green and get hulking mad and throw stuff around, you have a good character.
I don't. My hands are too big and the bead is so stiff!

So, a long worded response to your simple question but I recommend pulling the tire off the rim and try the zippie way.

Otherwise, the way I used to struggle and fight to get the valve in required Hulkifying angry strength.
And that always resulted in lots of skin torn off the backs of my hands and fingers.

The valve stem tool helps to fish but you still have to fight to get the valve at 90 degrees to the rim hole to feed it through.

Anyone else have a good secret?

I am going to use Zip-Ties from now on. I used a small screwdriver to lift the lock tab to release the zippies for reuse.
I picked up a bag of 15 (?) at Lowe's and now I keep them in my tool box with my tire tools.

Hope this helps

Thanks for the excellent tutorial on the Zip ties. I'd heard about these but have only used them to hold a flat tire on the wheel when out in the middle of nowhere. Never used them to mount a tire. I'll have to try it.
Seems it would make sense to carry the Zippies on the bike with you, as a roadside flat would go easier using them to remount.

Are they hard to pull out once tire is mounted?
How many Zippies are used in all? Seems like at least 3 ?
I'm thinking these Zippies are very heavy duty? Do they have a gauge number or anything?

Thanks again!
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2012, 09:48 PM   #725
JagLite
Studly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 954
Thumb Zip-Ties for tires

Here is a picture




I had already removed a couple zippies when I thought to take a picture, They slip right out, no trouble at all.

This is the front tire that i did first, I used even more zippies on the rear since I had them, the are quick and easy to install and remove, and the brand new rear knobbie has a VERY stiff carcass. The beads did not want to pull together. I think i could ride 100 miles with a flat, no problem.

The package of zippies says on it:
18" Heavy-Duty Cable Ties
5" max diameter
175 lbs
GB (Gardner Bender) brand that I picked up at Lowes electrical department.

There are 15 in this package.
I agree that they would be an excellent addition to the on-board tool kit.
They don't weigh anything and are very handy.

I just put as many on as seemed beneficial. I don't think you could use too many and I don't know what a minimum might be. Enough to keep the two beads together I would say.

I placed my tire tool so that it was bearing against the zippie as it is more slippery than the rubber tire.
No idea if that made a difference or not.

In the picture you can see the zippie I put around the tire and rim to keep it down in the well by the valve,
You can just make out the end of the valve stem with the nut on it.
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 09:51 AM   #726
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Perfect, thanks for the pic. Tells the whole story.
I have a tire change coming up ... will report back on this.
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 03:44 AM   #727
rogor
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 23
anyone reading the rubbish from jonkol in the usual dr thread
some people...
rogor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 08:17 AM   #728
JagLite
Studly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 954
Cool2 Flexy Flier Frame

Yep.

I sure am glad I don't have a flexy frame DR.

Too bad his does.

Good thing he is the only one...

I guess the rest of us happy DR riders are ignorant of this serious design flaw that only his bike has.
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 10:04 AM   #729
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogor View Post
anyone reading the rubbish from jonkol in the usual dr thread
some people...
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
Yep.
I sure am glad I don't have a flexy frame DR.
Too bad his does.
Good thing he is the only one...
I guess the rest of us happy DR riders are ignorant of this serious design flaw that only his bike has.
The sad part is I think johnkol really believes the DR frame flexes. I'm convinced he has one of (or a Combo of ...) the following problems:
1. Worn or loose Wheel, Head or Swing arm bearings ?
2. A crack somewhere in the frame, perhaps in the steering head area or
where swing arm attaches to main frame around linkage area??
3. Bent forks ?
4. Out of align frame (from previous accident) ?

It could also be clapped out suspension, but probably one of the above issues are having an affect too ....

I don't think he is a Troll ... but somehow has got a weird DR650. He's taken a lot of Flack ... but handles it pretty well, IMO.
I have seen (and ridden) bent frames that you can't tell are bent. But the bike handles weird ... has a mind of its own. Can be subtle, impossible to see with naked eye.

There is a guy called The Frame Man up near Sacramento, CA who is expert at straightening ... mostly does race bikes. Excellent work ... and night and day difference once frame is perfect. There are others who provide these same services. Frame Man has been around over 20 years. I take bent wheels to him ... and one crashed bike. Perfect results!
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 10:24 AM   #730
victor441
Studly Adventurer
 
victor441's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Sonoma, Calif.
Oddometer: 804
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
Here is a picture

I had already removed a couple zippies when I thought to take a picture, They slip right out, no trouble at all.

This is the front tire that i did first, I used even more zippies on the rear since I had them, the are quick and easy to install and remove, and the brand new rear knobbie has a VERY stiff carcass. The beads did not want to pull together. I think i could ride 100 miles with a flat, no problem.

The package of zippies says on it:
18" Heavy-Duty Cable Ties
5" max diameter
175 lbs
GB (Gardner Bender) brand that I picked up at Lowes electrical department.

There are 15 in this package.
I agree that they would be an excellent addition to the on-board tool kit.
They don't weigh anything and are very handy.

I just put as many on as seemed beneficial. I don't think you could use too many and I don't know what a minimum might be. Enough to keep the two beads together I would say.

I placed my tire tool so that it was bearing against the zippie as it is more slippery than the rubber tire.
No idea if that made a difference or not.

In the picture you can see the zippie I put around the tire and rim to keep it down in the well by the valve,
You can just make out the end of the valve stem with the nut on it.
I'm totally sold on the zip tie method too, have been using six for the three Avon Roadrunners I've mounted so far but have not tackled a stiff radial yet. One other tip I picked up here that helped a lot was to buy a gallon of tire mounting lube from Napa, it really does work better than soapy water. I also made a simple fixture from a bucket to hold the wheel, mounting is much easier with the wheel held solidly at waist level.




victor441 screwed with this post 11-17-2012 at 11:08 AM
victor441 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 11:10 AM   #731
barko1
barko1
 
barko1's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2004
Location: Las Cruces, NM or thereabouts
Oddometer: 3,099
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
The sad part is I think johnkol really believes the DR frame flexes. I'm convinced he has one of (or a Combo of ...) the following problems:

2. A crack somewhere

Perhaps in the region above the neck

Troll?? DR worst bike ever?
__________________
DR650, 98 Bimota SB6R, Kawasaki 14, 67 X-6 Scrambler (apart), SL350K1 (apart), 77 Goldwing 1000, Triumph Thunderbird Sport, Triumph Daytona Super III, DR650, MZ Skorpian Sport Cup, 71 Triumph Daytona 500, KDX220
barko1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 02:32 PM   #732
doug s.
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: md
Oddometer: 1,237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
The sad part is I think johnkol really believes the DR frame flexes. I'm convinced he has one of (or a Combo of ...) the following problems:
1. Worn or loose Wheel, Head or Swing arm bearings ?
2. A crack somewhere in the frame, perhaps in the steering head area or
where swing arm attaches to main frame around linkage area??
3. Bent forks ?
4. Out of align frame (from previous accident) ?

It could also be clapped out suspension, but probably one of the above issues are having an affect too ....

I don't think he is a Troll ... but somehow has got a weird DR650. He's taken a lot of Flack ... but handles it pretty well, IMO.
I have seen (and ridden) bent frames that you can't tell are bent. But the bike handles weird ... has a mind of its own. Can be subtle, impossible to see with naked eye.

There is a guy called The Frame Man up near Sacramento, CA who is expert at straightening ... mostly does race bikes. Excellent work ... and night and day difference once frame is perfect. There are others who provide these same services. Frame Man has been around over 20 years. I take bent wheels to him ... and one crashed bike. Perfect results!
either something is seriously wrong w/johnkol's bike, or he's a troll. i am leaning towards "troll" because, if he seriously thinks the bike sucks, you would think he'd be interested in riding another sample, or having it thoroughly inspected by a pro, due to the comments he's gotten from everyone else, including folks w/a lot of experience. but, his mind seems to be made up - he seems totally uninterested in checking out another dr650, or seeing whether or not some systemic problem exists w/his bike, let alone trying to improve it w/upgrades...

doug s,
doug s. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 07:54 AM   #733
outdoornate65
Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Front Range, CO
Oddometer: 66
"Factory" lowering of DR650?

Hey guys....

I've seen it mentioned a couple places that there is the ability to lower the DR650 in it's stock configuration.
Is this correct and if so, how is it done?

I understand using lowering links but I think this was something different.

Thanks,

Nate (the noob)
outdoornate65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 08:29 AM   #734
JagLite
Studly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 954
Thumb Lowering the Factory way

Yes, the DR is designed so that it can be lowered by altering the suspension.
The shop manual has the info on how to do it.
Don't have a shop manual yet?
Buy one.

Basically, the forks are removed, opened up, and the steel tube spacer that sits on top of the main springs is moved to fit on the damper rod with the top out spring.
That lowers the forks and limits their travel by the length of the spacer.

The rear shock is removed, pretension on the spring is released by turning the two rings on the top of the spring and once the spring is real loose the spring seat at the bottom ( a big chunk of aluminum with a slot in the side) is slipped off the shaft and turned upside down and slipped back in place. Then the spring tension rings get re-tightened and the shock gets reinstalled and bolted back in place but using the upper of the two bottom mount holes on the clevis.

The spring seat flip limits the travel in the rear so that the tire doesn't hit the fender.
Using the upper of the two lower mount holes in the shock clevis is what lowers the rear end of the bike.

I have done it twice and it is not difficult if you are comfortable working with tools and following instructions.
Some have the dealer do it but if the dealer mechanic is not familiar with the DR factory lowering I would NOT have them do it.

I don't have my shop manual here so others may want to correct anything I have said that is not correct.
I am going by memory and that isn't very good any more.
Never was actually, but is worse now.

This will lower the bike almost 2 inches.
Suzuki sells a shorter kick stand for the lowered bikes.
Or you can cut and weld the stock one.

The forks can also be slid up in the clamps a bit to lower the front more without the tire hitting the fender, and lowering links can be used in the back too.
Keep in mind that this also decreases ground clearance and suspension travel.

My Street Tracker Sumo bike is lowered 5" in front and 4" in the rear for a lower CG.
(I have a 19" front wheel on it)
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 09:33 PM   #735
heirhead
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: On the water in SoCal
Oddometer: 424
shhh!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogor View Post
anyone reading the rubbish from jonkol in the usual dr thread
some people...
Be very quiet, he might hear you as I am typing very softly.

Heirhead
heirhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014