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Old 11-07-2013, 08:10 PM   #1486
Floyd111
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tyres

There might have been a reason why the tyres looked like they all could do with some air.
On proper roads in good conditions tyres are best off with OEM tyre pressure.
In sand and snow, or even ice, you'll have more grip with some 20% less air in the tyres. On sand that effect is much bigger even with less pressure.

BTW, can you send me your address now for shipping the damper?
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Old 11-07-2013, 08:23 PM   #1487
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Reunited with Spirit once again!
I finally feel like I have a place to call home, what a nice feeling to have for a while.


Getting to work at 7:30 in the morning
Boy was it ever cold, 8 degrees, should have worn leggings under my thin work pants


View from my living room window


View from my kitchen window

Today my landlord helped me pick up Spirit at the place where I crashed. We pushed her into a truck using a couple of 2 by 12s. Strapped her down and rode back to the garage.
Of course once there I had to make room for her. My landlord really needs to come and get all his junk, so I kindly put it out in the snow. He did confess that he really needed to let go of all the junk, it had been sitting there for years.


I cleaned up and made a space for Spirit. Once that huge couch frame is out of the way, I'll built a few shelves to put all of her parts on. Can't wait to get her all spiffy again.

First things first, new tires (almost new from Craigslist) and a wall between me and the vehicles so I don't smell all the fumes,
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:06 PM   #1488
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I have just found your interesting thread but only so far have read the last 3 pages. Oh man, oops woman, that sure looks cold out there. I guess you always adapt, well little choice really. Here it's 37 Celsius or about 100F. We have just had horror fires with 193 homes destroyed and another 100 partly burned. We are a small community of just a few thousand so we know many family's effected. A work day so most we're left with only the clothes they wore to work, some saved a car.
I'd say insulate your space and leave the car garage space open, it's your heat isn't it?
You have now spiked my interest so will have to start at the beginning of your thread. If you ever plan to venture to Australia, PM me and I can help with cheap but good digs and maybe a loan bike.
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:42 PM   #1489
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Originally Posted by southern cross View Post
I have just found your interesting thread but only so far have read the last 3 pages. Oh man, oops woman, that sure looks cold out there. I guess you always adapt, well little choice really. Here it's 37 Celsius or about 100F. We have just had horror fires with 193 homes destroyed and another 100 partly burned. We are a small community of just a few thousand so we know many family's effected. A work day so most we're left with only the clothes they wore to work, some saved a car.
I'd say insulate your space and leave the car garage space open, it's your heat isn't it?
You have now spiked my interest so will have to start at the beginning of your thread. If you ever plan to venture to Australia, PM me and I can help with cheap but good digs and maybe a loan bike.
I would love to visit Australia one day, so if I do, I shall PM you
I will have to block off the garage, the smell of my car is making me really nauseous and headachy. I'll be happy not to have to smell that anymore.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:18 PM   #1490
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Better check the car for gas leaks if it is bothering you that much. Oh and a 8 degrees you may see a few locals wearing tee shirts outside until it really gets cold.
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:50 AM   #1491
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Also as for the car in the garage. If you use 5-30 semi synthetic oil (0-30 synthetic would be better) and a decent battery in your car (you can get electric battery blankets that wrap your battery) it will be fine outside down to -20 to 30f. Your engine heater should only need to plug it in when overnight temps reach below 5f or so.

People here leave cars outside 365 days of the year and -35 is common during winter. Most put their block heaters on a timer to save electricity. A few hours is typically all they need until you start hitting the -25f and below range. Remember that is straight temperature, not the crazy wind chill temps that the news like to sensationalize. Wind chill is just a measure of how fast warm things (like skin or a warm engine) lose heat, not real temperature.

I find -25 to -30F to be a real change in temperature. Things start to get extreme after that and I hope you get to experience it just to say you have been there.

Up to -25 it is just cold. After -25 it is a whole different world. A breath of wind makes things dangerous to exposed skin after that.
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dryden_rider_54 screwed with this post 11-08-2013 at 05:14 AM
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:16 PM   #1492
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dryden_rider_54 View Post
Also as for the car in the garage. If you use 5-30 semi synthetic oil (0-30 synthetic would be better) and a decent battery in your car (you can get electric battery blankets that wrap your battery) it will be fine outside down to -20 to 30f. Your engine heater should only need to plug it in when overnight temps reach below 5f or so.

People here leave cars outside 365 days of the year and -35 is common during winter. Most put their block heaters on a timer to save electricity. A few hours is typically all they need until you start hitting the -25f and below range. Remember that is straight temperature, not the crazy wind chill temps that the news like to sensationalize. Wind chill is just a measure of how fast warm things (like skin or a warm engine) lose heat, not real temperature.

I find -25 to -30F to be a real change in temperature. Things start to get extreme after that and I hope you get to experience it just to say you have been there.

Up to -25 it is just cold. After -25 it is a whole different world. A breath of wind makes things dangerous to exposed skin after that.
Sure, I agree, but the other variable is the age and condition of the vehicle. A vehicle that will run just okay in the Fall will most likely fail in the winter extremes. I don't remember the age or condition of the subject vehicle, but I assume it is a "beater" based on the price paid for it. I hope I am wrong.
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:02 PM   #1493
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Originally Posted by Merlin III View Post
Sure, I agree, but the other variable is the age and condition of the vehicle. A vehicle that will run just okay in the Fall will most likely fail in the winter extremes. I don't remember the age or condition of the subject vehicle, but I assume it is a "beater" based on the price paid for it. I hope I am wrong.
Nope not wrong, it's a 1987 Subaru Station wagon 4-wheel drive. It actually runs really nice.
And as far as temperatures go, during the winter months it gets down to -40 on a daily basis. So yeah, a block heater would be nice!
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:05 PM   #1494
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dryden_rider_54 View Post
Also as for the car in the garage. If you use 5-30 semi synthetic oil (0-30 synthetic would be better) and a decent battery in your car (you can get electric battery blankets that wrap your battery) it will be fine outside down to -20 to 30f. Your engine heater should only need to plug it in when overnight temps reach below 5f or so.
The temps are already -15 at night, it's gonna go up again, but yeah, cold! As for synthetic oil, nah, not a good idea I think with an old car from 1987
Quote:
Originally Posted by dryden_rider_54 View Post
I find -25 to -30F to be a real change in temperature. Things start to get extreme after that and I hope you get to experience it just to say you have been there. Up to -25 it is just cold. After -25 it is a whole different world. A breath of wind makes things dangerous to exposed skin after that.
It's gonna be -40 here for a few months I hear, so yep, it's a different world out here
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:16 AM   #1495
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If you don't already have one, you might want to get a carbon monoxide detector. They are fairly inexpensive and it could save your life.
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:34 AM   #1496
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cant have you dieing on us yet your adventure is just starting
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Old 11-09-2013, 10:32 AM   #1497
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Thank you so much Archery21 for your "present"!
I will use it to help fix up Spirit during the winter months.
I'm glad you enjoyed my RR and hang on in there till my ride continues in the Spring/Summer
Have a great winter, and yes I'll be sure to drop by when I'm in your area.
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:47 PM   #1498
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I got 4 studded tires from Craigslist for $100, they look barely used . This morning while backing out of the garage I got stuck in the snow. After trying to dig myself out and putting down card board, I realized that I was very stuck. I then put her in 4-wheel drive low and that worked. I didn't want to use it because I have mismatched tires and 4-wheel kicks into frontwheel drive because of it. I made it out of the driveway only to get stuck again because I had to stop for an oncoming car. This time I did manage to get myself out and in the road. I made it to Wallyworld where they are putting the studded tires on. Yippee! I am curious how they will drive
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Old 11-10-2013, 02:53 PM   #1499
Floyd111
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synthetic oil

The reason people don t use synthetic oil on old cars is mainly because it it a little more expensive, and a waste on old engines that are not aluminium precise pieces of machinery like new HP engines mainly are.
But, your case is not the same. AT extremely low temperatures all engines are better off with (semi)synthetic oil. Not so much for wear and tear, but mainly for a easier start with a frozen engine
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Old 11-10-2013, 04:09 PM   #1500
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadGal View Post
I got 4 studded tires from Craigslist for $100, they look barely used . This morning while backing out of the garage I got stuck in the snow. I made it to Wallyworld where they are putting the studded tires on. Yippee! I am curious how they will drive
I have greatly enjoyed reading your RR. Our world views are somewhat divergent, but I appreciated seeing things through your eyes.

I found it amusing getting to the end here to find that you have purchased what was essentially my first car--A burgundy Subaru 4WD station wagon with studded tires. Mine was a slightly earlier vintage '82 or '83 I think. I lived in St. John's, Newfoundland at the time, and it has hills like San Francisco, only with a fair bit of snow, and frequent freezing rain. With studded tries on the Subaru was like a little tractor. I think you will be very happy with your car. I kept using and jury rigging mine until it had welded in 14 gauge steel homemade girder beams keeping the front and back halves of the car together, the sheet steel of the hood had to be pop riveted back onto the the underlying frame and it was a total loss system, it needed daily applications of gas, oil, air, water and electricity to keep it rolling.

It does not have a great deal of ground clearance however. From what I've read in your RR you don't have a lot of experience living in a snowy climate. If you continue to just try and bulldoze your self out of the driveway--the following is my prediction... As you force your way out you will compact the snow in the driveway into ice or snow so hard you will need a front end loader to clear it out to get into your driveway. Part of the penalty for living in a snowy area is that you will have to allocate quite a bit of time to snow clearing, whether by shovel, scoop, snow blower or heavy equipment. If you make a habit of clearing your driveway it won't become impassable/un-clearable in a few weeks. If you have tenants living upstairs they should be pitching in on getting the driveway clear as well. Its a good idea to leave a snow shovel in the back of the car.

Earlier in your RR you mention getting or almost getting abducted years ago. I was wondering if that is a story you would be willing to briefly share? If its too personal to share I'd understand.

Could you take a picture or two of your black folding foam tent seat thing in its deployed position so we can have a better look at it? I've seen seats similar to that one, but not that particular one.

Good luck, I look forward to reading about your further adventures both great and small!
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