ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-15-2012, 10:06 AM   #1
HayDuchessLives OP
Loquita
 
HayDuchessLives's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Anchorage
Oddometer: 1,121
There's no place like Nome for a holiday!

Alaska is a huge state offering a diversity of breathtaking scenery making it a fantastic place to go riding. The main drawback is that we have few highways, and even fewer “dirt” roads to ride on. For example, Anchorage, the biggest city in the state, only has two highway options, basically riding north or south. I have ridden on quite a few of the highways in our great state, some of them multiple times (including the Dalton Highway, although I’ve only gone “all the way” once) and I was itching to explore some new dirt roads.

Last fall a couple guys I work with mentioned I would enjoy riding the road between Nome and the Inupiaq Eskimo village of Teller and said there were a couple other dirt highways out of Nome. My curiosity was instantly piqued! After doing more research, and chatting with a manager with Lynden Air Cargo who said “no problem” to shipping my motorcycle up to Nome, my dream was born and I started making plans. It sounds like very few motorcycle riders have been to this area and I wanted to be the first or among the first females to do a fly/ride trip there! I pretty much figured I would be riding alone and I felt comfortable with that as I usually ride solo. And while I was riding alone through the wide expanse and peaceful solitude of the remote backcountry for nine days, I never felt lonely. I participated in a smudge ceremony honoring “the ancestors” before I left and I knew they were riding with me.

I planned my trip around the 4th of July holiday for a couple of reasons, mainly to combine work with pleasure and visit one or two of the small Native villages the utility I work for provides power to. They usually have festivities to celebrate the holiday and I knew I could get some great photos to use in a future magazine article. Plus, I could spend the night in our power plants and lock up my motorcycle in a secure area. Gasoline tends to get stolen out of unattended vehicles and I didn’t want to end up high and dry.

This ride report will have different sections to highlight each of the three dirt highways leading out of Nome: the Kougarok Road, Nome-Teller Highway, and Council Highway. The last section will feature photos taken in Teller when the local residents surprisingly welcomed me into their village and allowed me to take part in their 4th of July events.

The city of Nome

My vacation lasted eleven days with two days of travel and nine wonderful, FUN days riding, camping, hiking, and rafting in the Nome region. My amazing ADVenture started in Anchorage, when I dropped my motorcycle off at Lynden Air Cargo to get shipped to Nome. All I had to do was drain my gas; their experts strapped my bike down in preparation to safely ship it. I had to give him a goodbye hug.



Here’s my bike at the Lynden Air Cargo warehouse in Nome. I learned it’s exactly 1 mile to the nearest gas station, which I had to walk to and from to get gas for my bike. No problem! Gas was $6/gallon.







Nome, established in 1901 with a current population of about 3,600 people, is located on the Seward Peninsula in the Norton Sound region of the Bering Sea. One of Nome’s claims to fame is being the ending point of the famous Iditarod Sled Dog Race. I surprisingly felt quite thrilled to see the last stretch of the long trail the mushers and their sled dogs look forward to after starting their long, arduous journey in Anchorage.





This burled arch gets moved out onto the main street and mushers officially finish the race when they ride through this arch.



Nome’s origins started with the discovery of gold and a big gold rush that brought hundreds (thousands) of people to the area. This sign near the airport welcomes visitors to Nome.



Here are some neat monuments. One honors the Three Lucky Swedes who discovered gold and were an integral part of Nome’s early history. Another monument honors the Eskimos who have inhabited this land for countless generations, enduring harsh conditions.







This sign really struck a chord deep within me.



There’s a second gold rush taking place, thanks to a documentary/reality TV show that highlights gold dredging on the Bering Sea. I very rarely watch TV so I don’t know what the hoopla is all about, but I saw lots of dredges in Nome along with a lot of visitors trying to strike it rich mining for gold in, and near, the Bering Sea.








These piles of big rock are known as “rip-rap” and are increasingly being used to control coastal erosion that is taking place throughout Alaska’s western coastline. Climate change is greatly impacting Alaska in a variety of ways, including a change in sea ice and the ferocity of fall and winter storms. A storm of epic proportions swept through western and northwestern Alaska last November causing extensive damage to shorelines, roads and infrastructure. This rip-rap is being installed along Nome’s shoreline and basically along the Council Highway for the next 30 miles as the road keeps getting washed out during storms with strong surges.



This is one of the main hotels in town.






This is an infamous saloon that was built before Nome was officially incorporated as a city (1900 and 1901, respectively). I was told I HAD to visit this saloon, the Board of Trade, when I came to Nome. So, even though I don’t drink alcohol, I went inside to chat with Leon, the long-time bartender who took photos of my bike and I. He said he’s only seen one other rider come through, a few years ago on a KLR, who wrote an article for a motorcycle magazine. There were some very interesting characters in the bar and I was entertained while I sipped on a diet soda. I think I heard stories about AlcanRider helping construct the original building.



Boy – my bike and I were very excited to see another DR. Whoohoo!! I HAD to park next to it and get photos. What a lovely sight to see! This DR belongs to inmate Frostbit1.



When I saw this I instinctively thought there might be a story behind it so I took a photo. It turns out this reindeer, Velvet, is one of Nome’s famous fixtures. It’ a pet that is treated like the family dog and even gets to go indoors and recline on furniture. Even though Santa doesn’t live here, people still engage in reindeer herding.



I thought this was an interesting mini backhoe.



Here’s a link for more information about Nome: http://www.visitnomealaska.com/

I highly recommend this B&B: http://www.beringseabb.com/ The owners are very friendly and helpful! ADV inmate Frostbit1 lives two houses down from this B&B and he can provide help (if needed) along with information about riding in the Nome area.

I also highly recommend visiting the museum, it’s first class:http://www.visitnomealaska.com/nome-businesses/museum/museum.html



I'll write more later. Now it's time to get some housework done.

Happy trails!

__________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks," John Muir.
2007 Suzuki DR650 (Loquita) & 2009 Suzuki DR650 (Soquili)
Fun Denali Hwy RR: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=622201; Awesome Nome RR:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=808795

HayDuchessLives screwed with this post 07-17-2012 at 10:31 PM
HayDuchessLives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 10:57 AM   #2
100mpg
This sentance intent
 
100mpg's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: ionally finished in this space.
Oddometer: 16,570
A reindeer in a pickup. Now thats something you dont see everyday!
subscribed!
__________________
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth" - Steve McQueen
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). DSI #694
100mpg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 11:08 AM   #3
Duk
Starting Over
 
Duk's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Steamboat, CO
Oddometer: 8
Love it!

I'm in!
Duk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 12:01 PM   #4
rgiroux
Invisible Man
 
rgiroux's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Socal near the great 33
Oddometer: 2,211
I grew up in Anchorage and Fairbanks and never got to see any of the other "towns". Great pics and sounds like a great trip!
__________________
"Otherwise, its been a carnival of idiots, and Im the f*ckin ringmaster" - RTW Doug
Speed is your friend, it also why you see a bike up in a tree from time to time - WarLlama

2009 Alaska , 2010 Moab
2011 Calif Dreaming , 2013 Mexico
rgiroux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 12:29 PM   #5
ksnak
Duc Gal
 
ksnak's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Location: Anchorage
Oddometer: 134
Really enjoying this! Been to Nome myself once (sans motorcycle), including jaunts on the Tellar and Council roads, and it's fun to see pics of sites I recognize. Loooking forward to reading more of your report!
__________________
2006 Ducati Multistrada
2008 Triumph Scrambler

Out beyond ideas of wrong doing and right doing there is a field. I'll meet you there. Rumi
ksnak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 12:34 PM   #6
Wolfgang55
Beastly Adventurer
 
Wolfgang55's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Next to Rio Bravo
Oddometer: 3,301
Roughly the cost of RT shipping your scoot ?

That looks like a "to do " place.

thanks
Wolfgang55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 01:44 PM   #7
100mpg
This sentance intent
 
100mpg's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: ionally finished in this space.
Oddometer: 16,570
I am going to show my NY ignorance and wonder why you can't ride there? They run the dog sled teams up there, there must be some sort of trail...
__________________
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth" - Steve McQueen
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). DSI #694
100mpg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 01:55 PM   #8
Alcan Rider
Frozen Fossil
 
Alcan Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2003
Location: Just over the rear wheel
Oddometer: 3,851
Quote:
Originally Posted by HayDuchessLives View Post




This is an infamous saloon that was built before Nome was officially incorporated as a city. I was told I HAD to visit this saloon when I came to Nome. So, even though I don’t drink alcohol, I went inside to chat with Leon, the long-time bartender who took photos of my bike and I. He said he’s only seen one other rider come through, a few years ago on a KLR, who wrote an article for a motorcycle magazine. There were some very interesting characters in the bar and I was entertained while I sipped on a diet soda. I think I heard stories about AlcanRider helping construct the original building.



You might consider posting that photo in this thread, but without the smart-alecky comments about someone who happens to be in possession of embarrassing photos of yourself.

__________________
"I am in the prime of senility." Ben Franklin
I'm so old I remember when the gallons rose faster than the dollars on gas pumps.
The Lure of the Dalton, The Lure of the Dempster, Haul Road Chronicles, My Evening Rides, Alaska Primer
Haul Road Primer
Alcan Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 01:59 PM   #9
Alcan Rider
Frozen Fossil
 
Alcan Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2003
Location: Just over the rear wheel
Oddometer: 3,851
Quote:
Originally Posted by 100mpg View Post
I am going to show my NY ignorance and wonder why you can't ride there? They run the dog sled teams up there, there must be some sort of trail...
Yes, a trail - that for many miles is over a frozen Yukon River. Gets a bit damp during the summer, however, the time of year when most semi-sane people do their motorcycle touring. That does not mean that a motorcycle will never be ridden all the way from Fairbanks or Anchorage to Nome. It has been discussed by more than one rider. Some studded tires, a warm parka, ...and who knows?
__________________
"I am in the prime of senility." Ben Franklin
I'm so old I remember when the gallons rose faster than the dollars on gas pumps.
The Lure of the Dalton, The Lure of the Dempster, Haul Road Chronicles, My Evening Rides, Alaska Primer
Haul Road Primer
Alcan Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 02:17 PM   #10
marty hill
The Energizer Bunny
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: marietta, ga.
Oddometer: 4,124
Great report and pics. I was there on a USCG ice breaker a long time ago. Are there still wooden sidewalks? One of your pics shows concrete.
__________________
ride till you can't.
1200GS/black
Boxer Cup Replika/red-white-blue

Semper Paratus
marty hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 02:23 PM   #11
100mpg
This sentance intent
 
100mpg's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: ionally finished in this space.
Oddometer: 16,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcan Rider View Post
Yes, a trail - that for many miles is over a frozen Yukon River. Gets a bit damp during the summer, however, the time of year when most semi-sane people do their motorcycle touring. That does not mean that a motorcycle will never be ridden all the way from Fairbanks or Anchorage to Nome. It has been discussed by more than one rider. Some studded tires, a warm parka, ...and who knows?
ah HA! So there is a possibility! Where's my insulated sweatshirt...brb.
__________________
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth" - Steve McQueen
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255). DSI #694
100mpg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 10:01 PM   #12
HayDuchessLives OP
Loquita
 
HayDuchessLives's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Anchorage
Oddometer: 1,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfgang55 View Post
Roughly the cost of RT shipping your scoot ? That looks like a "to do " place.
thanks
The RT cost to provide first-class transportation for my bike was $600 for 412 pounds, through Lynden Cargo. I got a slight discount as the company I work for does lots of business with Lynden. I got lucky as they didn't weigh my bike when I shipped it back to ANC and it weighed more as I, ummm, "accidentally" left my heavy tools in the panniers so I didn't have to walk around town carrying them in my backpack.

Rental cars cost about $150/day although some locals will rent their vehicles for $100/day.

I highly recommend this ride and it sounds like I'll be returning next summer.
__________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks," John Muir.
2007 Suzuki DR650 (Loquita) & 2009 Suzuki DR650 (Soquili)
Fun Denali Hwy RR: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=622201; Awesome Nome RR:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=808795
HayDuchessLives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 10:24 PM   #13
HayDuchessLives OP
Loquita
 
HayDuchessLives's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Anchorage
Oddometer: 1,121
Kougarok Road - to Salmon Lake

My vacation schedule was very flexible, allowing lots of play time. My goal was to ride to the end of all three of Nome’s dirt highways, preferably on days with sunshine and decent weather. I had nine days to ride and explore, with lots of leeway for bad weather, fun hikes, paddling excursions, visiting a Native village, or lazy days. I did NOT want to ride down these roads when it was raining or when the mountains are covered in clouds as my priority was to see the scenery, hopefully under bright sunny skies. Several snafus delayed my departure from Nome, but once we finally left I still had plenty of time to get to the campground and set up camp before dinner. One major snafu was the lack of any fuel for my backpacking stove and I searched all the stores in Nome. It's "haz-mat" and can't be flown up there, legally... I couldn't boil water for the dehydrated meals I brought so I made do with peanut-butter and jelly sandwiches or tuna salad sandwiches for lunch and dinner. I lost a few pounds on this diet!

Kougarok Road - Salmon Lake Campground

The Kougarok Road, 86 miles long, ends at Kougarok River. I actually ended up riding to the end of this highway twice, mainly because it was extremely beautiful and a TON OF FUN to ride. The dirt road is well maintained and starts out by following the Nome River while traversing a beautiful river valley. The goal was to set up camp at Salmon Lake campground at Mile 40, possibly for three nights. I knew it would get cold up here at night as the lake still had ice on it less than two weeks ago.

The Nome River starts at Salmon Lake, slowly and cheerfully meandering its way down to the Bering Sea. I brought my lightweight packraft with me so I scoped out the Nome River for potential rafting opportunities. It's was too shallow for rafting here, but closer to the coast the waterflow is more substantial and great for rafting and kayaking.




Even though I have done previous solo trips into the wilderness, I had bouts of fear and nervousness about doing this trip before I left Anchorage, but I knew that once my bike and I got on the road and got “into the zone,” we would be fine. And my highly esteemed and knowledgable mentor, Alcanrider, told me he had confidence I would do fine as long as I rode conservatively. And even though I didn’t know anybody in Nome, I was sure the locals would gladly offer assistance if necessary. After riding a few miles up this highway, I relaxed and knew my bike and I were going to have a great adventure.



There was still some snow in places.



This is what we live for - long, lonely, roads that wind through stunning scenery!



This region is above treeline so there generally are no trees, but lots of dense brush and small willow trees provide hiding spots for animals. A lot of this terrain reminded me of other high alpine areas I have visited, including along the Dalton and Dempster Highways.



As I rode farther up the valley, away from the flat coastline, the rolling hills turned into bigger mountains and I could start seeing some of the taller peaks of the scenic Kigluaik Mountains. I love exploring in the mountains and hiking up to the summits so I enjoyed pondering possible routes up some of the peaks, especially those with nice long ridgelines, like these two small mountains.





I didn’t get many photos on the way in as I wasn’t sure how long it would take me to get to the campground and there were some ominous clouds building up. I wanted to get my tent set up before the rain started! I was in awe and noticed my speed had decreased so I could more thoroughly appreciate the beauty unfolding before me. I knew I could get better photos when the sun reappeared, so I continued slowly on towards the campground. These two valleys looked like interesting areas to explore with a backpack.





I could tell from Google Earth that Salmon Lake was pretty big, but seeing it in person gave me a greater appreciation for its size. I was glad I brought my packraft as I tentatively planned on spending at least three or four nights in this campground and paddling is usually a relaxing way to start or end the day. This BLM campground has six designated sites with picnic tables, grills and an outhouse and is basically the only “formal” campground in the region. There are lots of places you call pull over and camp however, and I think there is a camping area down on the beach in Nome, but it’s really windy down there with little privacy. You can get fresh spring water from a pipe around Mile 33 of the highway, before the campground, which is located at the far end of the lake.



I was the only person in the campground so I practiced “bear safety” techniques and ate dinner about 200 yards from my campsite on a knoll overlooking the lake and campground. The lake actually contains salmon, but check on fishing regulations before fishing as it used to be illegal to catch salmon here, due to the stock getting depleted. This is a favorite spot for bears who enjoy eating salmon. Here are a couple views from the four-star restaurant's view.





The sun and clouds played peek-a-boo, providing interesting lighting displays. I thought Mother Nature may have been showing off, allowing the peaceful beauty of this area to work its magic on my soul. I wish I had brought my Native flute so I could play for The Ancestors, but you can’t pack everything and I brought the handy-dandy kitchen sink instead.








After dinner I went hiking to do a recon of the area. I was pleasantly surprised to discover a nice beach running alongside the edge of the water.





And I found seashells....



And lookie here: it’s the rare wooden starfish. I felt privileged to see this sight as these wood starfish are almost extinct and unique to areas where the wooly mammoths used to roam.



I wandered over to check out this dilapidated building. It seemed kind of sad and I felt sorry for it as it used to be somebody’s home, where they chased dreams of finding gold in this unforgiving environment, and now the broken windows, faded paint and peeling roofing represents shattered dreams.




These vibrant flowers represent new growth and cheered me up.





__________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks," John Muir.
2007 Suzuki DR650 (Loquita) & 2009 Suzuki DR650 (Soquili)
Fun Denali Hwy RR: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=622201; Awesome Nome RR:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=808795
HayDuchessLives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 10:37 PM   #14
HayDuchessLives OP
Loquita
 
HayDuchessLives's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Anchorage
Oddometer: 1,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcan Rider View Post
You might consider posting that photo in this thread, but without the smart-alecky comments about someone who happens to be in possession of embarrassing photos of yourself.
Uh oh. Am I in trouble? Maybe you were still in diapers when the saloon was built. Oops - is that going the wrong way chronologically?

Unlike trips I have gone on with you, I didn't pose for any goofy photos on this ride as there was nobody to encourage me to do silly things OR to take photos. Does that mean I'm becoming more of a serious rider?

__________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks," John Muir.
2007 Suzuki DR650 (Loquita) & 2009 Suzuki DR650 (Soquili)
Fun Denali Hwy RR: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=622201; Awesome Nome RR:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=808795
HayDuchessLives is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 05:00 AM   #15
Slideways#96
scooter trash
 
Slideways#96's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Northern NM
Oddometer: 473
Pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by HayDuchessLives View Post
Alaska is a huge state offering a diversity of breathtaking scenery making it a fantastic place to go riding. The main drawback is that we have few highways, and even fewer “dirt” roads to ride on. For example, Anchorage, the biggest city in the state, only has two highway options, basically riding north or south. I have ridden on quite a few of the highways in our great state, some of them multiple times (including the Dalton Highway, although I’ve only gone “all the way” once) and I was itching to explore some new dirt roads.

Last fall a couple guys I work with mentioned I would enjoy riding the road between Nome and the Inupiaq Eskimo village of Teller and said there were a couple other dirt highways out of Nome. My curiosity was instantly piqued! After doing more research, and chatting with a manager with Lynden Air Cargo who said “no problem” to shipping my motorcycle up to Nome, my dream was born and I started making plans. It sounds like very few motorcycle riders have been to this area and I wanted to be the first or among the first females to do a fly/ride trip there! I pretty much figured I would be riding alone and I felt comfortable with that as I usually ride solo. And while I was riding alone through the wide expanse and peaceful solitude of the remote backcountry for nine days, I never felt lonely. I participated in a smudge ceremony honoring “the ancestors” before I left and I knew they were riding with me.

I planned my trip around the 4th of July holiday for a couple of reasons, mainly to combine work with pleasure and visit one or two of the small Native villages the utility I work for provides power to. They usually have festivities to celebrate the holiday and I knew I could get some great photos to use in a future magazine article. Plus, I could spend the night in our power plants and lock up my motorcycle in a secure area. Gasoline tends to get stolen out of unattended vehicles and I didn’t want to end up high and dry.

This ride report will have different sections to highlight each of the three dirt highways leading out of Nome: the Kougarok Road, Nome-Teller Highway, and Council Highway. The last section will feature photos taken in Teller when the local residents surprisingly welcomed me into their village and allowed me to take part in their 4th of July events.

The city of Nome

My vacation lasted eleven days with two days of travel and nine wonderful, FUN days riding, camping, hiking, and rafting in the Nome region. My amazing ADVenture started in Anchorage, when I dropped my motorcycle off at Lynden Air Cargo to get shipped to Nome. All I had to do was drain my gas; their experts strapped my bike down in preparation to safely ship it. I had to give him a goodbye hug.



Here’s my bike at the Lynden Air Cargo warehouse in Nome. I learned it’s exactly 1 mile to the nearest gas station, which I had to walk to and from to get gas for my bike. No problem! Gas was $6/gallon.







Nome, established in 1901 with a current population of about 3,600 people, is located on the Seward Peninsula in the Norton Sound region of the Bering Sea. One of Nome’s claims to fame is being the ending point of the famous Iditarod Sled Dog Race. I surprisingly felt quite thrilled to see the last stretch of the long trail the mushers and their sled dogs look forward to after starting their long, arduous journey in Anchorage.





This burled arch gets moved out onto the main street and mushers officially finish the race when they ride through this arch.



Nome’s origins started with the discovery of gold and a big gold rush that brought hundreds (thousands) of people to the area. This sign near the airport welcomes visitors to Nome.



Here are some neat monuments. One honors the Three Lucky Swedes who discovered gold and were an integral part of Nome’s early history. Another monument honors the Eskimos who have inhabited this land for countless generations, enduring harsh conditions.







This sign really struck a chord deep within me.



There’s a second gold rush taking place, thanks to a documentary/reality TV show that highlights gold dredging on the Bering Sea. I very rarely watch TV so I don’t know what the hoopla is all about, but I saw lots of dredges in Nome along with a lot of visitors trying to strike it rich mining for gold in, and near, the Bering Sea.








These piles of big rock are known as “rip-rap” and are increasingly being used to control coastal erosion that is taking place throughout Alaska’s western coastline. Climate change is greatly impacting Alaska in a variety of ways, including a change in sea ice and the ferocity of fall and winter storms. A storm of epic proportions swept through western and northwestern Alaska last November causing extensive damage to shorelines, roads and infrastructure. This rip-rap is being installed along Nome’s shoreline and basically along the Council Highway for the next 30 miles as the road keeps getting washed out during storms with strong surges.



This is one of the main hotels in town.






This is an infamous saloon that was built before Nome was officially incorporated as a city (1900 and 1901, respectively). I was told I HAD to visit this saloon, the Board of Trade, when I came to Nome. So, even though I don’t drink alcohol, I went inside to chat with Leon, the long-time bartender who took photos of my bike and I. He said he’s only seen one other rider come through, a few years ago on a KLR, who wrote an article for a motorcycle magazine. There were some very interesting characters in the bar and I was entertained while I sipped on a diet soda. I think I heard stories about AlcanRider helping construct the original building.



Boy – my bike and I were very excited to see another DR. Whoohoo!! I HAD to park next to it and get photos. What a lovely sight to see! This DR belongs to inmate Frostbit1.



When I saw this I instinctively thought there might be a story behind it so I took a photo. It turns out this reindeer, Velvet, is one of Nome’s famous fixtures. It’ a pet that is treated like the family dog and even gets to go indoors and recline on furniture. Even though Santa doesn’t live here, people still engage in reindeer herding.



I thought this was an interesting mini backhoe.



Here’s a link for more information about Nome: http://www.visitnomealaska.com/

I highly recommend this B&B: http://www.beringseabb.com/ The owners are very friendly and helpful! ADV inmate Frostbit1 lives two houses down from this B&B and he can provide help (if needed) along with information about riding in the Nome area.

I also highly recommend visiting the museum, it’s first class:http://www.visitnomealaska.com/nome-businesses/museum/museum.html



I'll write more later. Now it's time to get some housework done.

Happy trails!

Fabulous pic's..Have always wanted to ride from NM to Alaska on the dr. I understand heli skiing is in your neck of the woods is great as well. Some day.........
Slideways#96 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014