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Old 02-05-2013, 09:34 PM   #16
JackL OP
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Belize!

I crossed into Belize on what turned out to be Election Day. In MX I was warned not to but I thought being able to experience this little part of history would be interesting. I was.
This was my first border crossing between 'Central American' countries. It was pretty easy. I did get a helper at the border who spoke perfect English (it's Belize, they all do). I paid him $20 US which was too much but oh well.
After the border it was a short run down to the town of Orange Walk. Belize was a big change from MX. It got less flat than the Yucatan, the people changed from brown to black, the language changed from Spanish based to English based, and the level of poverty seemed to increase. I found a bank and got some money while waiting out a rain storm. Not much was open because of the elections. Like in the States the 2 parties were Blue or Red. That's about all I can tell you about them. I couldn't get a clear picture of their difference but people in the shirts of their color were out everywhere. The roads were literally packed with them in the towns. Unlike in the US they all seemed to mingle together in great jovial crowds with little tension.
I arrived in Belize City in early afternoon and didn't have too much trouble finding a guesthouse with secure parking, the Sea Breeze. I then explored the city and got some dinner.


It seems one of the parties didn't like a Mr Barrow, who I later found out was the current Prime Minister.



That would be $3.50 US.



I'd heard some very negative things about Belize City and there were certainly a lot of guys out trying to hustle your money. I ended up meeting what I thought was a young kid but turned out to me a tiny, seriously dread-locked older woman named Mary while out wandering. There was no beer being sold all day in the country but she hooked me up with some and while sitting on the deck of her family's flat she explained the politics. Sort of. They were the Blue party who was trying to get rid of Barrow.
The northern part of town we were in, where my guest house was, was only kind of rough. When I went off to get more beer she said "Don't worry maaan. If'n anybody boder you jus tellem you're friend o Mary." Nobody did but I was reassured as she was the Matriach of the area.
I drank and partied with here extended family until about 4 am. The Blues lost.
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2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 02-05-2013, 10:14 PM   #17
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I'd been talking to an ADV Rider RodRut. He lived down in Placencia which is known as the Caye you can drive to. I'd had the panier lid I needed sent on to him so headed down that way. He thought he might ride up and meet me but that didn't work out so after stopping in Belize's new Capital, Belmopan, I headed on his way on the Hummingbird Hwy. Now things were getting interesting. Hills and curves for the first time in weeks.


A typical little bridge.


I made it to the Barefoot Bar, gave Rod a call and had a drink while I waited for him to arrive.


Now all that Rod had said to me was "I am building an international airport, and a few other projects here in Placencia." I figured he was an engineer down here enjoying the sunshine for a while. Turns out he's the owner of the airport and the nearby resort hotel.
So he put me up in his McMansion and took me over to the resort and just said "This is Jack, he's on my account." So then it was roughing it for a bit.
At the pool


On the beach


My post from my first morning there, "I feel like a Colonialist sexist pig-dog. I wake up this morning and there are little brown women running around waiting on me. Coffee, breakfast, and somebody washed my motorcycle for me last night. I feel guilty but good at the same time. :)"

I liked all the different variations of these signs I came across.


Parts of Placencia were nice, traditional areas.


And parts weren't


Hey here's Rod in the foreground. He has a pretty nice life down here.


Remember I mentioned speed bumps. Yeah. Here's more
Let me take a minute to talk about speed bumps, or Topes as they're called in Mexico. They're obsessed with them. Every little town and burgh has as many as they can. I think it's a status symbol. If the town down the road has three, we gotta get four kind of thing. They come in all shapes and sizes but are normally about 8 in high and 2 ft wide. Those are the Topes. The Velocidades are like our normal American speed bumps. They also use plastic turtles which are a pain on the bike since you don't quite fit between two.

These can come up quite suddenly when hidden in a shadow or unpainted and are quite, um, exhilarating. They really slow down your ride and screw up your rhythm. The only good thing about them is they make excellent places to pass trucks, buses, and slow cars. And at least on the bike you can stand up and pound over them.

I thought maybe I'd got away from them in Belize. There weren't any up north. However on the 11 miles of road between where I'm staying at Rods and Placencia there are exactly 30 of them. 30 of the fuckers. Somebody must be getting kick-backs. It's a tedious drive each day.

I'll finish with a story of a night at the Barefoot Bar. I headed down there on my own and had some drinks. It was a fun night and I got to talking to a couple of people at the table next to me. It was a group of about 8 women and a couple guys and was one of the womens birthday. I bought her a Chocolate Cake shot which they had never heard of. I then decided to talk to every single person at the table. They were all down from Belize City celebrating the birthday. They were all very friendly except for one of their fathers. it turned out one of the girls, Bea, had gone to college in Washington state, just a 6 hour drive from Seattle. We had a long conversation and all wandered off to more partying that night.

From my Facebook (FB) post the next day, "Well, now I understand why most of my girlfriends and lovers didn't have many female friends. They make lousy Wingmen. A guy will encourage you in going home with someone. A girl will complicate or negate it.
OK, I have to be honest. This statement pretty much doesn't apply to my female friends. You are, mostly, above that. A couple of you (Hi Sue) are the best wingmen (wingwomen?) in the world."
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2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls


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Old 02-05-2013, 10:26 PM   #18
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Panty Rippers

I'll leave you with this today. Panty Rippers are a drink that the people in Belize like. And my FB post of Mar 10, this day of the ride.

"Started reading a new book yesterday. The beginning got me hooked immediately:

"We were wanderers from the beginning. We knew every stand of tree for a hundred miles. When the fruits or nuts were ripe, we were there. We followed the herds in their annual migrations. We rejoiced in fresh meat. through stealth, feint, ambush, and main-force assault, a few of us cooperating accomplished what many of us, each hunting alone, could not. We depended on one another. Making it on our own was as ludicrous to imagine as was settling down. Working together, we protected our children from the lions and the hyenas. We taught them the skills they would need. And the tools. Then, as now, technology was the key to our survival. When the drought was prolonged, or when an unsettling chill lingered in the summer air, our group moved on—sometimes to unknown lands. We sought a better place. And when we couldn't get on with the others in our little nomadic band, we left to find a more friendly bunch somewhere else. We could always begin again. For 99.9 percent of the time since our species came to be, we were hunters and foragers, wanderers on the savannahs and the steppes.
There were no border guards then, no customs officials. The frontier was everywhere. We were bounded only by the Earth and the ocean and the sky—plus occasional grumpy neighbors. When the climate was congenial, though, when the food was plentiful, we were willing to stay put. Unadventurous. Overweight. Careless. In the last ten thousand years—an instant in our long history— we've abandoned the nomadic fife. We've domesticated the plants and animals. Why chase the food when you can make it come to you? For all its material advantages, the sedentary life has left us edgy, unfulfilled. Even after 400 generations in villages and cities, we haven't forgotten. The open road still softly calls, like a nearly forgotten song of childhood. We invest far-off places with a certain romance. This appeal, I suspect, has been meticulously crafted by natural selection as an essential element in our survival. Long summers, mild winters, rich harvests, plentiful game—none of them lasts forever. It is beyond our powers to predict the future. Catastrophic events have a way of sneaking up on us, of catching us unaware. Your own life, or your band's, or even your species' might be owed to a restless few—drawn, by a craving they can hardly articulate or understand, to undiscovered lands and new worlds.

Carl Sagan - Pale Blue Dot.
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2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 03-02-2013, 07:03 PM   #19
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Still in Belize

I decided to head back to Belize City to see my new friend Bea. I took a different route back along the Coastal Hwy which turned out to be a lot of fun.




I stayed at the same guest house, the Sea Breeze. I looked around for something else because I wasn't wild about the place but nothing else in my price range had secure parking. It had rained and the roof across from me turned into a pond.


Bea's mother, and now Bea, work for the Prime Minister. She picked me up in her SUV and we went out for Chinese food, which is quite good in Belize, then she showed me around her city.


This is from my Facebook post of Mar 15, "So 2 days ago, when getting ready to ride into town to get my pannier lid, I noticed my rain gear had gotten pretty moldy in 4 days stuffed in a plastic bag. Especially the gloves. When I got to Belize City I took the gloves to my room with me to dry. This was fortunate because some one climbed the 8 ft wall, got over the razor wire, and broke into my 2 front, soft panniers and stole my rain pants and coat. Or more likely it was an inside job. The owner's son, who worked nights seemed a bit sketchy and kind of a dick the whole time. He would have known when I was asleep in my room. The owner's of the Sea Breeze guest house wouldn't even refund me my $25 for my nights stay for not keeping my bike safe.

I still have my normal riding jacket which is slightly water proof, and the gloves. This is good because of course yesterday it rained like cats and dogs. Fortunately I was able to pull into a tiny restaurant, Shena's, for the local meal, ride and beans with chicken. I spent an hour there letting the rain pass off to the west. As I was leaving one of the zippers on my riding jacket failed a couple times."
Shena's, a great place for lunch.


Of course this was the first day I'd been hit with heavy rain the entire trip, and I had no rain gear. Fortunately I wouldn't need it for another 2 months. I made it to San Ignacio, Belize that afternoon. Got a room at the Hi-Et GH and checked out the town. Met another American named Brian and did some drinking at Greety's Bar.
.

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2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 03-02-2013, 07:22 PM   #20
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End of Belize

The next morning I was up and out through the fog. Got a good breakfast at Benny's Kitchen.


Then headed off to Xonantonich ruins.


I was the first one there for the day and had the place to myself for about an hour. It was amazing to walk in and see this rising through the morning mist






I heard my first Howler Monkeys here then headed back in San Ignacio and met up with Brian. We hit another ruin and then an Iquana hatchery.
Brian from CA






Iquanas everywhere


And that's it for Belize. With a last view of the stairways to nowhere I was off to Guatemala.

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JackL
2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls


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Old 03-02-2013, 08:52 PM   #21
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Eastern Guatemala

The border crossing from Belize to Guatemala was one of the easiest of the trip. No Helper needed. There was a gas station with an ATM just inside the border so no need to exchange much at the border rates. I headed straight to


I had read that if you entered the park after 3 PM they stamp you for the next day so you get 27 hours there. While waiting for 3 to come around i talked to a German girl who had bicycled there from Ushuia. It had taken here 15 months and she figured she had that much more to go to get to Alaska. Talk about a long trip.
First time I'd seen one of these signs.

Jaguar crossing.

I set up camp and immediately headed out to the ruins. First I came across this type of wild Ocellated Turkey


This is Temple V.


You can pay a bit of extra money to go watch the sunrise from one of the larger temples. I was going to do it but when I rolled out of bed at 3 AM there was heavy overcast so I went back to sleep. No one saw the sunrise that day. After the skies cleared I headed out. Tikal really is the best set of Mayan ruins in Central America.
What do you call a bunch of Coatls? A herd? A flock? Well here's a video of them.
http://s83.photobucket.com/albums/j2...P1050400-1.mp4





There were also monkeys


And Ant Superhighways


And of course more ruins




If you're in Tikal with your own vehicle you can ride about 20km to another set of ruins, Uaxactun just outside a native village. I recommend it. It's the only place down there you can do this.


On the way through the village I saw the most amazing native girl. She looked and was dressed traditionally but had stunning blue eyes. Like aquamarine gems.
On my way back to Tikal I didn't see a Jaguar. I did see a rare jungle Fox. Then it was on to Flores. As you may know Flores is built on an ilsland in lake Peten Itza and connected to shore by a 500m causeway.
I stayed at the Dona Goya hostel and had lunch at a great little restaurant called Cool Beans.


It's a very pretty area.


View from the roof of the guest house




From FB, 'Went out looking for a St Patrick 's day party. Found the just opened Buccaneers Bar. They had Jack. I spent almost. $7 on 3 stiff drinks there. They have no Pirate music, just Bob Marley's which I told them not to play. Brittany Spears which I threw away for them, and some average 70s rock and some Metal. Tomorrow I am burning all my Pirate music for them. The Wages of Sin, Alestorm, Rum Rebellion, etc."
As I was wandering back to my guest house I came across a black KLR with an ADV sticker on it. I left a note and the next day ADV Rider Old-N-Slow found me. We did breakfast then headed around the lake to what was supposed to be a big party. it wasn't but later we hit the Buccaneers Bar.


Old-N-Slow himself


We had a good local meal down the street. This fish can only be found in lake Peten Itza.


The owners of the Buccaneers loved the pirate music and wouldn't play anything else. The gave me a bottle of rum which I shared with them and things got silly.


The next morning, surprisingly not hung over, it was back to Cool Beans for breakfast and then on the road SE to Honduras


I stopped for lunch here at Rio Dulce




Then on to the border


I'll end with this from FB, "3 1/2 hour border crossing into Honduras. You'd think if they require you to have a copy of the stamp they put in your passport they might have a copier machine. No, they rely on a hotel 500m down the road in no-mans land. Which wasn't open. Fortunately a nice Honduran-American Grandmother in Immigration helped me out. All I had to do was send my passport and drivers license with a kid on a bike to who knows where. Everything returned by taxi and said grandmother, Juanita, then gave me a place to stay in her huge house up the road. :) I thought I was going to be camping in No-Man's land for the night.



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JackL
2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 03-14-2013, 08:53 PM   #22
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Honduras, Pt 1

As I mentioned Honduras was a bit of a bitch to get into but with a bit of help from the locals it worked out. Since evening was closing in and I had an offer of a place to stay I only drove about 30 km to Masca. Juanita the grandmother Immigration woman from Brooklyn wasn't home yet so I had a couple beers at a little joint just down the street and ended up "talking" with a deaf kid who was into bikes. Here he is trying on my body armor.


Juanita had a big house that her son had built or her. I had the whole upstairs to myself. It was weird, like a US log cabin and reminded me of where I grew up in Indiana


She called up her nephew and he and his girlfriend took me down to the coast for dinner.


Another bit from FB here about that night. "I was awoken about 4 am by a dog, maybe 200 meters away, that wouldn't stop barking. He went on for about 30 minutes before Bang, Bang, Bang! 3 pistol shots rang out. No more barking dog. As cruel as it is I'm glad the dog was quiet. I may be a bad person but also dogs there aren't the same. They're not really pets."
Up the next morning and back to the beach for breakfast and local sights.


Jaunita saying goodbye on her way to work in the morning


I headed on into Honduras low on gas and with no local currency. I was getting worried for the first 2 hours because I was getting low on fuel and then was able to get both. Riding in Honduras is the most extreme I came across in Central America. They have, fortunately, a lot fewer speed bumps than the rest of the countries but this just makes the multitude of little towns you cross through trickier. 60 mph with big buses behind you watching for/dodging (in order) small children, horse/cow drawn wagons, dogs, entering vehicles, adults. Each one was intense and exhilarating. I stopped here in Tela for lunch.


Nice view from the porch.


I made it to La Ceiba on the north coast. I found a hostel. I don't remember the name but that's ok because I wasn't that impressed with it. The woman they had working there could barely be bothered to stop watching soap operas and get out of her hammock to help you. The good thing about it is it was owned by the same people who owned the Jungle River Lodge (http://www.jungleriverlodge.com/) up in the mountains where, if you'd stayed at the place in La Ceiba, you could go white water rafting/zip lining and get a night free.
After the last couple days complications I treated myself to a nice steak dinner on the beach.


Some of my friends will get the significance of finding this card on the street as I walked around


This was the only place I felt I was intentionally ripped off in all of Central America. I bought a 6 pack of beer and was given a lot less change than I should have gotten. It was my fault for not counting it and I wasn't yet familiar with the currency there. It really pissed me off at the time and gave me a bad taste for La Ceiba for a few days before I chalked it up to accident or learning.
I headed out to the Jungle River Lodge late the next day. No one else was up for a Zip-line Canopy trip but they allowed me to squeak in on the bouldering/rafting trip. I was still a bit hung over at first so some of the swimming against the current bits was a difficult and my guide looked a bit worried about me. About 15 minutes in the water and jumping and sliding off boulders and I was back in form. No pictures from that adventure but it was a lot of fun. Good rafting back to the Lodge. Here's a few pics from after.
The river with one of the rafts down below.


The valley we came down. Middle of summer so water levels were low. They say in the rainy season the water is 20ft higher.


Their friendly parrot.


Their bar where I spent the afternoon


Some of the workers I met there invited me up to their village further into the mountains for a local village on village soccer (football) match the next day. I was in a hurry to get on further east but now wish I had done it.
I headed on out towards the NE corner of Honduras to the "Mesquito coast." Named after the people, not the insect. Damn it was hot. Had to increase my water intake by double a day." Even the locals said it was unusually hot.
Typical road hazards.


The hostel I was intending to stay at was closed. Did I mention the guide book I'd downloaded for free was about 5 years old? After driving around a bit and being rejected by one hotel that wouldn't take me because they couldn't secure my bike I found the Hotel Tujillo for 150 of the local currency. I can't say much about my room except it was cheap, had clean sheets, and a fan. Even my own bathroom. About all you really need.


I only spent one afternoon and night there but walked around a lot.
There's quite a bit of interesting and odd history linked to Trujillo. You can read about it on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trujillo,_Col%C3%B3n). One of the most interesting characters was an American mercenary who tried to invade Central America and found a new republic, William Walker. He met his end here.
The cemetery where he's buried.


Butcher shop. That's one well behaved dog


Just off the central square


Great view from Cafe Vino Tinto


The old fort


Another good bit from FB here. "So the night I was out in Trujillo, Honduras I was wandering around. I noticed an Internet cafe which was closed. A young well dressed guy from down the street asks me, in perfect English, if I'm looking for Internet. He and his friend offer to walk me to a place that was still open. Of course they turn out to be Mormons. I regaled them with tales of my motorbike adventures on this trip. I figure always good to rub it in a bit to those on the other side. So they can see what they're missing.

Just a funny picture of my arm after a few days wearing my body armor without a shirt over it. Geometric tan lines


My intention was to ride from Trujillo SSW to Tegucigalpa. After about 2 hours on the road, where I stopped twice to show my map to locals and make sure I was on the right road, I ended up in Limon. Not on the road to Tegucigalpa but near where they filmed the movie The Mosquito Coast with Harrison Ford. Even my good Central American map of this area was pretty off. I decided to ride back to La Ceiba and check out an interesting bar I saw on the way out. It was a pretty ride.




Met up with these guys coming the other way.


Went to the bar.


As you can tell it's motorsports themed. Met the nephews of the owner who run the place. Watched some races. Drank with the locals. Had a lot of fun.
I decided to spent one more day in La Ceiba now that my opinion of it had changed. I ended up at the appropriately named The Expat Bar. They had good German Beer. It'd been so long since I'd had anything other than lager.




I ended up talking to an X-Honduran Air Force pilot who is now a judge and learned they confiscate a lot of nice light aircraft there that are hauling drugs to the US. I may be going back to pick up a nice twin engine for my current friend/boss in the near future. Yes I'm a pilot but it's been a while.

I had found something about a hostel/brewery in Honduras. I looked it up and it was on the main route to Tegucigalpa. I've wanted to go to Tegucigalpa since I first learned of it in 3rd grade. What a great exotic sounding name. I left Ceiba and made it to the D&D guest house in one day. A few pics.




D&D guest house/brewery. I highly recommend it. For only about $1 US more a night I got a room and bathroom to myself. They even have a pool.


I'll end this part with another Facebook post about this days ride. It was surreal.
"In the voice of Eddie Izzard 'Beer or Death?' Beer please.
First I saw 2 pretty serious car accidents. An ambulance leaving one. Then a small black and yellow bird flew up and hit my right peg and foot. In my rearview I saw its body tumble along the road.
A little later I slowed down to drive around some cops. A truck was parked on a small bridge. As I passed it I looked right and under some palm fronds was a dead human. Adult male I'd guess by the size.
Now I'm at the guest house with a private room having my first micro-brew since San Diego. Life is strange. Or as the people here said, "Welcome to Honduras."
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JackL
2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls


JackL screwed with this post 03-14-2013 at 11:33 PM
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Old 03-16-2013, 08:25 PM   #23
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Honduras 2

I met an odd American couple, Spencer and Amy and we drove up to Palhapanzak water fall. It's 140 ft (42m) tall. Only 30 ft shorter than Niagara. You can get a guide and go in along the side and then under the falls. Prepare to get Very wet since for a good portion you are in the direct fall of water. There's also a zip line there which I regret not doing. Just didn't have the cash with me.


Amy had a waterproof camera so we got some good photos






I spent a couple days at D & D before heading towards Tegucigalpa. This part of Honduras reminded me a lot of the mountains of California. Hot and dry with mostly pine and great, smooth 2 lane Hwy. Not what I expected. As I was driving along I passed a bike that sure looked liked like an ADV Rider. I looked back and saw him braking and we both swung around. As we got to talking we realized we knew each other from this website. We'd actually been talking about meeting up and riding together. It was Tengai in Toronto.


Unfortunately he was already on his way back north. I headed on up over the mountains where I stopped for a snack.
I wasn't the only one having a bite.


I hadn't heard much good about Tegucigalpa so after a quick swing through for money and gas I headed NE into the mountains to Valle de Angeles.


I found a nice guest house with cabins that had good views.


Then wandered into town for some dinner. This pair looked like best friends.


The next day I thought I'd swing back through Tegus as the locals call it and see if I could find a hostel that was in my book. Like many Central American cities the streets are not marked. I stopped in a gas station on one of the major streets and tried to find someone who could show me where I was on my map. Nobody could, not even one woman who worked there. It struck me later that they may not learn that skill in school there and just know how to get around there part of the city from experience.
Next it was on south with a trip off the main road up to a little town called Tatumbla. It was a pretty old mountain village but the road to get to it was atrocious.


I almost spent the night there but was feeling the urge to get on to Nicaragua.
That's where I'll pick up next time.
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JackL
2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 04-01-2013, 12:11 AM   #24
Tengai In Toronto
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Glad I finally found this thread!! What a thorough account! Great pictures too. Especially the one of me in Honduras....

Let me know when you head to the great white north
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:43 PM   #25
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Nicaragua!

I'm just going to post a lot of pics and come back and fill in the detail later.
Reminds me of where I grew up.


The road from Esteli to Leon




Managua
My guest house






Sandino




The mall


The famous Adv Rider Salcar


His mothers new puppy Nikita


His house and bike collection


One nights collection


My good friend Kirk flew down from Seattle and we spent a couple weeks traveling Nicaragua.
The cool Pyramid GH where he stayed in Managua before we headed out to
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The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 04-10-2013, 12:02 AM   #26
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Nic part 2



The ferry to Ometepe island.

Hospedaje SOMA. Our place for the week


We rented a couple little 200cc dirt bikes since I'd left mine at Salcar's. Riding the north end of the island from Moyogalpa to Atigracia.


Beer break


Down on the southern part of the island


Little Morgan's GH


Kirk, on the right, runs into his nemesis. Seattle and Portland FB clubs.


The northern voclano, still active, Concepcion


We took a kayake trip up the only river on the island: Istian




Stopped for a great meal after the river. Local fish.
Bit of food porn for you all.


Had a little company.


Then we stopped at Ojo de Agua springs. Beautiful place to swim...and drink.
Coco Locos


Shape up a coconut, pour rum in it, add straw. perfect.


Last ferry of the day coming in


Every night we'd walk down to the beach for a few beers at sunset. This guy was always watering his horse there.


From Tulum I'd been going pretty hard to meet up with my buddy. It was nice to relax a bit.

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The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 04-10-2013, 12:12 AM   #27
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Nica pt 3

We hopped the ferry back to Rivas.

then up to Managua and caught a flight to Big Corn island for a night.




From there up to the much nicer Little Corn island by boat. Guess which head is mine.


No roads, no cars, only a few hours a day of electricity. We found a hut on the beach at Cool Breeze GH on the windward (east) side ad did a whole lot of nothing. Our biggest adventure for 3 days was walking to the other side of the island for dinner.


And this.


From there it was a flight back to Managua and then down to the SE corner of Lago de Nicaragua to San Carlos.




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2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
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The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 04-18-2013, 05:40 PM   #28
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Nica Pt 4

We flew out over Grenada and the nearby islands.


We got a good view of Ometepe island


San Carlos is an interesting little town.


Oh that looks like a small runway

Just an optical illusion since it curves over the hilltop. Plenty of room and a nice gravel strip.

We stopped for a bit at the friend of a friends pizza place then found a room at Hotel Cabinas Leyko.


Took a little walk down by the water


And enjoyed another sunset over Lago de Nicaragua.


The next morning we were up early but almost missed our boat because we were told the wrong time so we couldn't stop here.


Off we went down river towards the Caribbean along the Rio San Juan on the sister boat to this.
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The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls


JackL screwed with this post 04-18-2013 at 05:43 PM Reason: Text editr
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Old 04-18-2013, 06:30 PM   #29
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Nica Pt 5

4th attempt to get this section posted. The browser has crshed 3 times. The last time I was able to post just a little, Pt 4. let's try 2 different browsers.

The sister to this boat.


Well that seems to have worked. One browser just crashed but no affect on the browser I'm working in.
So now a bunch of pictures of traveling down the river and the life there.








We stopped in Sabalos which is the end of the road. From here it's only boat.



After a few hours we reached our destination: El Castillo.


El Castillo has avery interesting history which you can read about here. The fortress changed hands almost every 20 years for 200 years between the Spanish and the British/Americans/Miskito/Zambo/pirates because it was the gateway to the gold of Grenada.


The fort was built at this point because of the rapids here. Only some of the smaller boats can navigate it even now.


Here's a little info from the tour. All the major pirates of the Caribbean seem have been here at some point.


We stayed at the Hotel Victoria which I highly recommend and splurged for the luxury of seperate rooms with air conditioning. Honestly it was dirt cheap.
We arragned for a guided tour out through the rain forrest for the next day which was exceptional.
Our female guide, Seyla Bustos had grown up in the area and was excellent.


Hotel Vic is on the left


Lots of wildlife as we headed down river




Green poison dart frog


Red poison dart frog


They're both pretty common in this area
We went on a 3 hour hike through the bush. Gorgeous out there
Strangle vine.


Fairly fresh Jaguar print.


They call this plant Monkey Ladder

Spider monkey on the boat trip back.


We stopped by a farm on the way back to pick up a boatload of fruit to take to town. One of the things I love about tours is in this part of the world is everything is very casual. Pick up some fruit, drop off some school kids, ferry a horse. It's all part of the experience.



We only had one day in El Castillo so headed back to San Carlos.
Where Egrets Dare


Then it was another flight back to Managua where Kirk got on a plane back to Seattle and I caught a taxi to Grenada.
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2007 KLR 650 aka the Green Max
1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP, Rose

The Big Trip (aka Le Grande Tour), Year 1
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585393

6 months in Europe on a Duc
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=217104&highlight=jackl

JackLs Thailand/Cambodia Adventure
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...ghlight=jackls

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Old 04-18-2013, 08:40 PM   #30
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Great RR, The photos are wonderful. Waiting for more of your adventures. Thanks.
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