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Old 07-22-2012, 10:36 AM   #16
Boon Booni
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Originally Posted by batoutoflahonda View Post
Any more they seem to get 3/4 of the way on and the bead is straight across the upper three quarter part of the rim. And solid. Is it just me or have others noticed this?
Everytime this has happened to me, the other side of the tire has popped out of the trough and I just didn't realize it.
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Old 07-22-2012, 10:42 AM   #17
fsuitw
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I recently had great luck with a set of stubby tire tools (http://www.stubbytiretools.com). Great leverage, comfortable in hand, and no marring to boot. I haven't used them on a modern tubeless tire, but for my application (73 r75/5) they were awesome.
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Old 07-22-2012, 10:45 AM   #18
Tosh Togo
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Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
I have been changing a lot of tires for a long time. I don't have a tire machine at my own shop. I haven't noticed anything different in the way new tires mount over how they did 20 or 30 years ago.


With one minor correction.... some riders are more inclined to whine about tires being difficult to mount. I guess that they've forgotten/ignored/made no effort to learn that-
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Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
+1,tires is tires,take the time and do it right and it can be done. Do it wrong and its an all day misery
Yuppers...just be smarter than the tires are...

fyi, in my meager experiences, the fact that a tire is tube-type or tubeless makes no difference, while the manufacturer's decisions about carcass stiffness does. Some are stiff, some are limber, and the fun part is in the finding out.
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Old 07-22-2012, 11:14 AM   #19
Bill Harris
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Originally Posted by Wirespokes
and it's one of the reasons I like the Bridgestones - lots easier to install than some of the other brands.
Bridgestone S11 Spitfires? Long-wearing, cost-effective, with decent handling?

I'm considering a change from Avon to those next "F&R" tire change.
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Old 07-22-2012, 11:14 AM   #20
supershaft
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I agree. Tube or tubeless makes no difference. I also agree that not all tires are alike but tube or tubeless doesn't have anything to do with it. Someone mentioned Dunlop Knobbies. They have been a mofo to mount forever that I know of. Dunlop bias plies in general are constructed like old 3/4 ton truck tires in so far as their weight and carcass stiffness is concerned. I use to work at a multi-line very busy dealership and we cut all the used tires in two for the landfill. The difference between Dunlop bias ply tires and most other brand bias ply tires was night and day.

supershaft screwed with this post 07-22-2012 at 11:21 AM
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Old 07-22-2012, 01:22 PM   #21
Padmei
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tosh Togo View Post


With one minor correction.... some riders are more inclined to whine about tires being difficult to mount. I guess that they've forgotten/ignored/made no effort to learn that-

Yuppers...just be smarter than the tires are...

fyi, in my meager experiences, the fact that a tire is tube-type or tubeless makes no difference, while the manufacturer's decisions about carcass stiffness does. Some are stiff, some are limber, and the fun part is in the finding out.

Yep that's all good saying that but when faced with fitting a Dunlop 606 on a front GS wheel with tube that you don't want to pinch & the last 1/3rd is so fricking tight it won't be moved I would love to see you hot guys effortlessly & cleverly slide it into place. In fact I'd pay good money to see it.
I took mine to guys with machines that do it all day & watched them struggle to get it mounted & seated correctly. Admittedly the tyre may not be suited to the rim but it was a major pain in the arse & I know that if I get a flat on the front out in the back of beyond I'll be riding back out on a flat.
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Old 07-22-2012, 02:01 PM   #22
Wirespokes
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I think Dunlops were designed for Harleys, or at least with them in mind.

Bill - right - S11. I also like the Battlax. Long wearing, good grip, easy to install and remove. And, like you said, cost effective.
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Old 07-22-2012, 02:01 PM   #23
hardwaregrrl
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Originally Posted by Padmei View Post
Yep that's all good saying that but when faced with fitting a Dunlop 606 on a front GS wheel with tube that you don't want to pinch & the last 1/3rd is so fricking tight it won't be moved I would love to see you hot guys effortlessly & cleverly slide it into place. In fact I'd pay good money to see it.
I took mine to guys with machines that do it all day & watched them struggle to get it mounted & seated correctly. Admittedly the tyre may not be suited to the rim but it was a major pain in the arse & I know that if I get a flat on the front out in the back of beyond I'll be riding back out on a flat.
Aw man...I just mounted a set of 606 front and rear. I usually let the tire sit in the sun for an hour before I mount them, it helps a bit. I had no problems with this set or the last set of Dunlops I mounted. I guess I'm just lucky!
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Old 07-22-2012, 02:18 PM   #24
supershaft
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Originally Posted by hardwaregrrl View Post
Aw man...I just mounted a set of 606 front and rear. I usually let the tire sit in the sun for an hour before I mount them, it helps a bit. I had no problems with this set or the last set of Dunlops I mounted. I guess I'm just lucky!
Your not lucky! Well, maybe a little but . . . . There are a lot of little tricks that all add up.

I still think it is pretty funny to suggest that new tire design is responsible for tires sometimes being a PITA to mount. Tires have always been a PITA to mount sometimes.
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Old 07-23-2012, 10:51 AM   #25
DaveBall
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Worst problem I have ever had with removing a set of tires were on a bike I bought that had been sitting for over 25 years with the original Metzlers on it. A 1980 R65 with snowflakes. Had one heck of a time breaking the beads. Ended up using an 8 foot 4x4 with a short 2x4 and pushing down on one end and having the other end underneath my car. Had to do this all the way around the tire, then pry that side off then turn over and do it again for the other side. They were major stuck.

Once I had the tires off, I cleaned up the inside wheel surface, removing all the old stuck on rubber bits, etc. then painted the wheels. The new Bridgestone S11 Spitfires popped on smooth as butter, using a little Ru-Glide and my normal 16 inch spoons.
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:58 PM   #26
Padmei
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Originally Posted by DaveBall View Post
Ended up using an 8 foot 4x4 with a short 2x4 and pushing down on one end and having the other end underneath my car. Had to do this all the way around the tire, then pry that side off then turn over and do it again for the other side. They were major stuck.
Thats what I use to break the bead - amazingly simple, cheap, quick & effortless.
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:39 PM   #27
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I'll add another simple trick that relates to Neduro's emphasis on positioning, and relates to the fact that some rims just don't have much drop-center at all (like the rear rim on my F 650).

For tubeless and tube type wheels I have a set of four small wood blocks cut from 1 X 2 wooden stake stock. length isn't critical, but mine are about 1 1/2 " long. I use them during removal and installation of a tire by placing them so that they hold the bead I'm working on in the drop center on one side of the wheel as I'm levering the opposite side of the bead over the edge of the rim. The blocks are small enough to fit in place and just big enough that they don't (normally, but it's happened on wide tubeless wheels) wind up inside the tire.

It is a WHOLE lot easier to get that bead started off the rim or finished onto the rim when something is holding the opposite side down in the rim's drop center. Easy enough I only use two 8 1/2" irons and one 10 inch spoon for any tire. (With real tire lube I keep in a sippy cup for ease of squirting and easy packing for trips).
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:04 PM   #28
supershaft
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Breaking beads? When I was a kid I always used the changer at my dad's shop but then we closed it down. For years after that I always jumped up and down on my bed with the tire underneath a corner of it. That worked perfectly until my bed broke in two. Then for years after that I used a regular old car jack and the bottom of my house but I moved away from that setup. Since then and for about two decades now I have been using a door jam and a old Toyota scissors jack. That and some wood blocks, of course (with all the before mentioned methods!).
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:10 PM   #29
bikerfish
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remember the old dunlop k491? those WERE truck tires!! but I would always mount one for a trip out west, never had to worry about the tire wearing out before coming home. they were a bitch to mount with those stiff sidewalls, and I don't even think you would know if you got a flat, damn thing still looked inflated!
I've stuck with the bridgestones for the past 10 years or so though, decent wear, good handling and grip, not too bad to mount, and cheap!
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:57 PM   #30
Other Bob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
I'll add another simple trick that relates to Neduro's emphasis on positioning, and relates to the fact that some rims just don't have much drop-center at all (like the rear rim on my F 650).

For tubeless and tube type wheels I have a set of four small wood blocks cut from 1 X 2 wooden stake stock. length isn't critical, but mine are about 1 1/2 " long. I use them during removal and installation of a tire by placing them so that they hold the bead I'm working on in the drop center on one side of the wheel as I'm levering the opposite side of the bead over the edge of the rim. The blocks are small enough to fit in place and just big enough that they don't (normally, but it's happened on wide tubeless wheels) wind up inside the tire.

It is a WHOLE lot easier to get that bead started off the rim or finished onto the rim when something is holding the opposite side down in the rim's drop center. Easy enough I only use two 8 1/2" irons and one 10 inch spoon for any tire. (With real tire lube I keep in a sippy cup for ease of squirting and easy packing for trips).

Nice approach Mark. I've used zip ties around the tire and rim as a "third hand" (fourth and fifth too, sometimes). That helps pull the bead into the drop center, but zip ties don't provide much inward pressure (squeezing the sidewalls together) to help make them narrow enough to get the bead down into the drop center to start with. I break a bunch trying to get enough pressure, too.

Something that clamps the sidewalls together AND squeezes/holds the beads down into the drop center might be helpful. Maybe I'll make an adaptation of your wood block approach using some old tiedown straps. The blocks could be hardwood wedges stapled with those big electrical wire staples so they allow the strap to slide along (but stay on) the wedge. Insert the wood wedges, ratchet the strap around the rim/tire and it should pull the bead down and the sidewalls together ... hmm ...

Nah .. nothing I make works that well.

Bob
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